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Fall Course Offerings

Fall 2014 AAAS Courses

AAAS 105 Introduction to Asian Philosophy - Goodman - T/R 2:50-4:15

Covers the basic concepts and teachings of several Asian traditions, including Hinduism, Confucianism and Daoism, with a focus on Buddhism. Readings to include scriptural texts, such as the Bhagavad Gita, the Dao De Jing, and selections from the Pali Canon, as well as the works of Asian philosophers, such as Vasubandhu, Mencius, Zhuang Zi and Shantideva. Examines such issues as the existence of God, the nature of truth, and the difference between right and wrong.

AAAS 106 East Asian Civilizations - Chaffee - M/W 12:00-1:00

An introduction to the geographies, cultures and historical experiences of the East Asian civilizations of China, Korea, Japan and Vietnam. The histories of these countries will be presented in relations to each other, since all created to the civilizational development of East Asia. The course will also focus on topics illustrating both the unity and diversity of East Asia: perceptions of each other, of the West and by the West; the religious/ philosophical traditions of Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism; the modern histories of the three countries since 1600; the growth of interconnections between East Asia and the rest of the world; the role of imperialism in East Asia; and the comparative development of East Asian countries since the Second World War.

AAAS 188F Beginning Chinese Flute - Staff - M/W 1:10-2:10

Prerequisites: None; suitable for freshmen; ability to read music is recommended. Beginning instruction on the Dizi, a transverse bamboo flute employed in many types of Chinese Folk Music as well as in various styles of Chinese Opera and in the modern Chinese Orchestra. The course will be taught by a guest artist from the National Academy of Chinese Theater Arts. Students will work on proper sound production, finger technique, articulation, and learn repertoire appropriate to the instrument. (Note: The Dizi is not really used with Beijing Opera, but with other music styles, particularly kunqu opera from southern China and Silk and Bamboo music from Shanghai.)

AAAS 210 Introduction to Japanese Culture - Sode - T/R 1:15-2:40

This course is a survey of key elements of Japanese culture. The topic areas include political and cultural history, geography, society, education and language. Additional topics of interest to the students will be identified and added at the end of the semester. Satisfies Gen Ed O (oral communication) requirement. No prerequisites. Lectures in English. Appropriate for freshmen.

AAAS 211 Korean Civilization - Kim - T/R 1:15-2:40

This course aims to introduce and familiarize students to the historical formation of Korean national identity through political, social, cultural, and economic processes. While the focus is on events and issues in contemporary south Korean society, understanding how nation-ness has been narrated, delineated, and even regulated requires situating debates on Korean culture, territory, history, and civilization within a longer historical context. Therefore, an overview of Korea's past since ancient times is a core part of the course. The latter part of the course will examine contemporary issues that suggest challenges or contribution to Korean national identity. No prior knowledge of Korean language or history is required.

AAAS 218 Structure of Korean - Cho - M/W 3:30-5:00

This course will provide an overview of the structure of the Korean language and discuss the relevant analyses of a certain structure. Based on the readings of the text, we will discuss the adequacy of the analyses including the generalizations and consider expanded sets of data. This course touches on the general areas of Korean linguistics, from Korean language background to sociolinguistics. For each week, everyone is required to complete the assigned readings specified in the syllabus and is encouraged to read the related literature if possible. Each of you is strongly recommended to further investigate the issues before the class meetings and reach your own conclusions concerning the adequacy of the analyses presented in the books.

AAAS 272 Island Culture: Taiwan Film and Fiction - Kaldis - M/W 2:20-3:45

This course presents an introduction to the film and fiction of modern Taiwan. We will carefully read, discuss, and interrogate a number of cinematic and literary works in which some of Taiwan's key historical, social, and cultural issues have been addressed, and we will familiarize ourselves with some of the academic scholarship on these works. Possible topics include: Japanese colonialism; relations with mainland China (PRC); traditional family relations; sexuality; gender; race and identity; indigenous peoples; the impact of modernization and globalization; cinematic genres; literary genres; ideology; and other topics. Above all, we will endeavor to construct our own dialogue with and interpretation of each film, short story, or novel. No prior knowledge of Taiwan history and culture or of Chinese language is required.

AAAS 280E Introduction to Asian American History - Cheng - T/R 1:15-2:40

This course is an introduction to Asian American history from a global perspective. We explore the broader historical developments that gave rise to the concepts "Asia" and "America" to trace their significance and consequence for later Asian (and other) migration to the United States specifically and the Americas generally. Topics we will address include: geography and geopolitics; global capitalism, diaspora, and labor migration; race, ethnicity, and culture; gender, family, and community; nationalism and citizenship; representations of race in the media and in commercial and popular culture; and the idea of "Asian American" in the civil rights and post-civil rights era.

AAAS 282Q Nature, Science and Technology in Korea - Kwon - T/R 4:25-5:50

This course will examine contemporary Korean society through the lens of science, technology, and nature. We are often used to thinking of science as something outside of human influence. But we can also examine science and technology as social phenomena. How scientific facts are made and verified? How social and cultural categories like gender, race, or class affect our scientific vision? How natural disasters affect our daily lives? Focusing on Korean society, this course will explore the cultural formations of scientific knowledge, looking at how technologies emerged within particular socio-cultural milieus, and questioning how "nature" has been incorporated in those processes.

AAAS 284B Modern India 1757-2000 - Dey - T/R 11:40-1:05

History of Modern India, 1757-2000 This course is intended as an introductory survey of the history, culture and political life of Modern India (1757-present). Themes covered include colonization and British rule; anticolonial nationalism; M K Gandhi; civil society, caste and religion; education; gender; and environment. It provides a broad overview of the important topics and historical signposts in the life of Modern South Asia. Using textbooks, maps, films, discussions and lectures, this course hopes to help students understand the complexity of this important region in relation to contemporary issues and global politics.

AAAS 284C Peoples and Culture of South Asia - Sugandhi - T/R 11:40-1:05

This class is an examination of societies in South Asia both past and present. Throughout the course we will examine the history and culture of this region, as well as some of the significant contemporary issues faced by the modern nation states of South Asia today. 

AAAS 317 The Economy of China - Yang - MWF 1:10-2:10

Prerequisite - Grade of C or better in ECON 160 or ECON 162. This course analyzes the economic growth and social development of China since economic reform started in 1978. In addition to introducing the facts and policy issues behind economic "miracle" of China powered by economic reform, the course also examines broad implications of Chinese economic reform on society, the environment, as well as international relationship. Format: Grading: attendance and participation, 10 percent; 50-minutes test, 30 percent; term paper, 40 percent; presentation, debate, discussion of paper, 20 percent. There will be a test in multiple choice and simple question format on basic knowledge of China and the Chinese economy. The test will be held at the end of semester. The term paper is an independent paper in connection with a group of four students on both sides of some controversial issues, such as Sino-U.S. trade conflicts, intellectual property rights, China's role in world oil market, real growth rate of China, etc. Then each team presents its paper in the class, discusses (and debates) with the team on the other side of the issue. Optional activity: watching one or two movies banned by the Chinese government on post-reform Chinese society.

AAAS 320 Asian Food Culture Politics - Ku - T/R 2:50-4:15

This course examines the cultural politics of Asian food, with particular attention paid to Asian gastronomy in the U.S. Using inter- and multidisciplinary methods and sources, the course addressess a wide array of culinary and gustatory questions, including: What constitutes an ethnic or national cuisine? What is the relationship between traditional and fusion cuisine? What are the gastronomic consequences of global migration, not only of peoples and cultures but also of foodstuffs? Is authenticity possible in the diaspora, or anywhere else for that matter? Must there always be a profit motive behind the exotic palate? By carefully exploring these and other food-related questions, the course not only provides students with a deeper understanding of Asian and Asian American histories and cultures, but also valuable insight into the broader political and symbolic meanings of food and gastronomy.

AAAS 340 Readings in Korean Literature - Kim - M/W 2:20-3:50

This course engages in the problems of cultural translation in Korean literature and film, particularly in moments of humor. The students will be expected to have a good command of the Korean language and culture in order to draw out the problematic implications of translating from Korean to English. This course is designed for students who have native, near native, or advanced Korean language skills along with high competency in the English language. Students will gain deeper insight into the various theories of cultural translation through pragmatic approaches.

AAAS 353 Prosody in Chinese Poetry - Song - T/R 11:40-1:05

This course explores the functions of linguistic elements in the prosody of Chinese poetry, covering different styles of poems from the oldest Shijing (as early as 1000 BCE) to the modern Chinese "free style" verses. Through discussions of rhyming, rhythm and tonal manipulation, the issue of poetic prosodic beauty is examined as a combination of literary creativity and the linguistic principles that govern the language and mind. Comparisons will be made between the Chinese poetic prosody and some Indo-European traditions as to further illustrate the dynamic interaction between language and literature.

AAAS 371 Asian Americans - Yun - T/R 1:15-2:40

This course examines the meanings of "Asian" in the context of a multi-facial/cultural Americas. The class will study and compare cultural productions of Asian peoples alongside those of different racial/cultural groups. Literary and cultural convergences in North America, Caribbean, and South America ultimately reveal the plurality and complex interdependencies of : Asian, African, Latin, European, and Indigenous Peoples due to colonialism, globalization, and transnational movements. This course is interdisciplinary and questions assumptions of nation and subject identity.. Through comparative study and linkage, the multiplicity and meanings of American citizenship and cultural identity will be systematically re-examined. Readings include creative and bold works from the 19th and 20th centuries that consider and theorize hybridity, gender, diasporic formations, globalization.AAAS 380O Literature in North Korea  - Kim - MW/F  12:00-1:00

AAAS 374 China in the 20th Century - TBA - T/R 1:15-2:40 Korean American Literature & Culture - Ku - M/W 4:40-6:05

This course surveys the history of China from the end of the nineteenth century to the present. The purpose of the course is twofold. On the one hand, it provides an outline of the major historical events of the twentieth century China. On the other hand, it examines the social conditions, political changes and cultural transformations of China during this often tumultuous period. The main themes include the transformation of China from empire to nation, China's engagement with modernity, and Chinese identity in a globalizing world. Attention is also given to Chinese diaspora, popular culture and controversial political issues, such as those concerning Taiwan and Tibet.

AAAS 380D  Asians and Latin American Immigration to U.S. - Yang - M/W 4:00-5:25

This interdisciplinary course draws primarily on social science methodologies, major concepts, and literature from diverse fields. It compares and contrasts the histories of, and motivations for, Asian and Latin American immigration to the U.S. It examines the impact of diverse laws on Asian and Latin American immigration. It looks at the conditions faced by Asian and Latin American immigrants in the U.S. as well as their responses to them. Lastly, it measures the overall impact of Asian and Latin American immigration on the U.S.

AAAS 380K  Hauntings of Asian America - Jones - M/W/F 2:20-3:55

Sun, surf, happy-go-lucky natives, tropical paradise. These are what comes to mind of most Americans when they think of Hawaii, the nation's Fiftieth State. What doesn't come as readily to mind are words such as colonialism, indigenous rights, sovereignty, plantation labor, and poverty. Using a variety of inter- and multidisciplinary methods and sources, this course examines Hawaii, aka the Aloha State, as a site of critical inquiry.

AAAS 380K Hauntings in Asia America - Jones - M/W/F 2:20-3:20

This class will explore the literature, media, and culture of Asian American refugees, with an emphasis on the Vietnam and Korean wars and other Asian conflicts with US military intervention (i.e., Cambodian Civil War). We will delve into the relationships of these migrant groups and the kinship ties between their country of origin and the US, and the resulting immigration post-war. The class closely examines migration due to war. The connections question identity in national, ethnic, and cultural terms. The class will look into novels, film, documentaries, as well as pop culture media representations.

AAAS 380O Literature in North Korea - Kim - T/R 4:25-5:50

The recent death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il has impacted the global community in significant ways, begging the question: Where is North Korea heading? Emphasis of this course will be on the cultural and intellectual issues and on how literary forms emerged, constructed, and responded to the rise of Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il's personality cults. Our readings will cover a wide selection of fiction, poetry, film, literary criticism, speeches, and reflections from defectors with the emphasis on the intersections of politics, history, and culture. We will pay close attention to the role of the collective and individual bodies and examine the development and changes that have occurred since the inception of the nation-state. Our goal is to develop critical reading skills and gain in-depth understanding of North Korea and its engagement with the global community beyond the Cold War rhetoric and media representations.

AAAS 380M Global Migration Flows and Processses - Kang - W 1:40-4:40

This interdisciplinary course draws primarily on social science methodologies, major concepts, and literature from diverse fields. It compares and contrasts the histories of, and motivations for, Asian and Latin American immigration to the U.S. It examines the impact of diverse laws on Asian and Latin American immigration. It looks at the conditions faced by Asian and Latin American immigrants in the U.S. as well as their responses to them. Lastly, it measures the overall impact of Asian and Latin American immigration on the U.S.

AAAS 380P Migration, Citizenship and Human Rights - Dasgupta - W 5:50-8:50

The course will examine the lives and experiences of migrant populations especially in relation to discourses of belonging and citizenship from a social justice perspective. A key aspect of the course will be an analysis of local, national, and transnational policies and their implementation strategies. A specific feature of this course is its emphasis on the interconnectedness of global, regional, national, and local realities, as they affect the lives of people in everyday domains. We will analyze, using a range of critical and feminist lenses, how social inequities and disparities have been historically created and maintained within and across geographical contexts.  

AAAS 380Q Dances of South Asia - Bulathsinghala - T/R 10:05-11:30

This class will incorporate an exploration of the fundamentals of traditional South Asian dance with a comparative approach that enables students to develop an understanding of cultural differences between dance styles in South Asia and the West. Students will be introduced to various ways of presenting and performing South Asian dancing genres, including not only traditional formats, but also in modern settings, such as concerts, television, and film. The class format will be divided equally between active physical learning of dance movements and discussion of assigned readings relating to such topics as dance-related history of clothing and interior design; dancing-related vocabulary such as drum beats, costumes, artists, and art movements; dance as a marker of relationships within and among different cultures; and aspects of dance fusion between South Asia and the West. The course will also seek to understand what motivates changes in fashion and taste over time. Previous dance experience is helpful but not necessary.

AAAS 382T North Korean Culture - Kim - MWF 1:10-2:10

This course analyzes the historical, political, social, and cultural changes in North Korea from 1948 to present day. North Korea has often been referred to a country where time stands still or a backward nation in images shown by Western media. However, a closer examination of the nation-state will reveal a contradictory and counter-intuitive outlook on the tumultuous evolution of the culture and daily practices. This course will provide a deeper insight into the elusive country, and it will provide the students to critically approach and understand the culture of the DPRK by examining the people's daily lives, family, education, cultural products, and favorite pastimes.

AAAS 384B Asian American Digital Culture - Cheng - T/R 4:25-5:50

Electronic computers, which used to be the size of rooms, are now small enough to carry or even wear and many times more powerful than their predecessors. Information processing devices like computers, however, have not only developed technologically, they have also overturned historically established industries, transformed the global economy, and as significantly, changed the patterns and practice of everyday life. This course explores developments in digital culture since the advent of modern computing and information technologies, asking what role Asians and Asian Americans have played in them. We will both consider issues within digital culture and work through their actual/practical "hands on" implications. We will read and think about ideas of "information," "computing," "digital convergence," "networking," "virality," "social media" in relation to how Asian / American cultures have adapted them in everything from e-mail, games/gaming, and music/video to Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat. Importantly, we will consider not only direct technological applications, but also their indirect social and cultural implications for shifting notions of and expectations of "free" and "pirated" content; security and freedom; and public appearance and privacy.

6AAAS 386B  Beijing Opera Face Painting - TBA -  T/R 3:35-5:45 - 2 credit course

One of the most distinctive aspects of Beijing Opera is its unique make-up style, which disguises actors with astonishing masks painted directly onto their skin. This class teaches the significance of symbolic patterns and colors used and techniques of pigment application. Taught by professionals from the National Academy of Chinese Theatre in Beijing, China. No prerequisites. Open to students from any major. Two credits.

AAAS 386C Beijing Opera Combat - TBA - T/R 3:35-5:45 - 2 credit course

This course concentrates on the symbolic fighting style of Beijing Opera, using special swords and spears. It is athletic and gymnastic and is clearly influenced by techniques of martial arts. Despite that, no previous training in any of the above is necessary for enrollment. Traditional weapons are furnished. Taught by professionals from the National Academy of Chinese Theatre in Beijing, China. No prerequisites. Open to students from any major. Two credits. Format: DIS - Discussion

AAAS 414 Economic Development - East Asia - Yoon - MWF 8:30-9:30

Prerequisites – Grades of C or better in ECON 360 _AND_ ECON 362; also grade of C or better in college level statistics. This course studies the fast growing economies of East Asia, especially Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, and China. The course overviews the performance and history of East Asian economies and analyzes the factors underlying East Asian economic development. Format: 3 exams and 4 - 5 short papers and presentations.

AAAS 431 Confucianism in Korea - Pettid - T/R 10:05/11:30

Confucianism is often cited as the most important ideology of Korea and said to have shaped diverse elements including gender relations, culture, and economic growth. This course examines the realities of the influence of Confucianism from its introduction in the 4th century to the present. Students will gain an understanding of the diverseness of Confucianism throughout history and its actual influence on Korean cultural practices.

AAAS 434/580L History of Women in East Asia - Kim - W 2:20-5:20

This seminar explores various topics in the social, cultural, and political histories of women in China, Japan, and Korea from early times to the present. Images of victimized women dominate our historical imaginations of East Asia. Through a range of textual and visual sources, we will interrogate those narratives and examine the various images and identities of women, constructions of womanhood, and shifting roles, status, and activities of women in East Asia. We will also look at how status, class, age, sexuality, and religious, national and political ideologies intersect with and/or differentiate the experiences of women.

AAAS 453/530 Trauma in Japanese Literature and Film - W 4:50-7:50

Among other things, hierarchy, classism, patriarchy, modernity and war have been profoundly disruptive and damaging to Japanese (and others) both personally and collectively. A significant number of representative works of modern Japanese literature and film constitute and explore such overwhelming experiences and their enduring aftereffects in terms of psychological trauma, traumatic reenactment, transgenerational transmission and viable means of bringing about individual, group and national recovery. In this seminar, we use trauma theory to analyze and interpret novels by Natsume Sōseki, Kawabata Yasunari, Ōoka Shōhei, Ōe Kenzaburō and Okuizumi Hikaru and films by Takahata Isao and Imamura Shōhei. The aims of the course are to learn in depth and detail about the psychodynamics of trauma, repetition and recovery and determine the extent to which this knowledge contributes to our understanding and appreciation of important works of modern and contemporary Japanese literature and film in particular, and modern and contemporary Japanese history, society, politics and international relations in general.

AAAS 461 Li Bai and Du Fu - Lei - M/W 2:20-3:45

Students will read poems by Li Bai and Du Fu in the original Chinese version. Each poem is followed by a short essay of analysis and appreciation, which discusses the poem's linguistic, historical, literary, and philosophical aspects. Thus, this course combines Chinese language and literature, classical and modern Chinese, and poetry and prose. Prerequisite: three years of Chinese language or equivalent.

AAAS 480F/580C Sports in Asian America - Ku - T 4:25-7:25

Filipino boxers and pool sharks, Korean golfers and ice skaters, Chinese gymnasts and ping pong "playas," Japanese outfielders, Pakistani cricketers, and a certain "insanely" talented Taiwanese American point guard: Whether they hail from Asia or the United States (or elsewhere), whether male or female, whether gay or straight, and whether they engage professionally or recreationally, Asians can be and often are sports fanatics. All manner of sports are not only immensely popular among Asians but is vitally important to them. But what exactly makes an activity a sport? Why do people engage in sports? What value does sports have to the nation and the national consciousness? How does gender and sexuality manifest in sports? And what happens when sports travel to different locations or when a sport is taken up by a new community? Using Asians, Asian Americans, and Asians across the diaspora as case studies, and through multidisciplinary approaches and sources, this course examines these and other questions critical to better understanding the cultural politics of Asians in sports.

AAAS 480I Social Justice - Yull - R  1:40-4:40 & 5:50-8:50

This course will examine the multi-layered processes that create, perpetuate, and challenge stratification, inequalities, and multiple forms of violence within and across societies. A key intent is to examine conceptions of social justice that underpin efforts to address and redress disproportionalities and disparities resulting from contemporary and historical relations of domination and subjugation. The focus of the course moves between the global context and that of the US, whereby students will analyze their own location within power and wealth structures. A special feature of this course is its emphasis on the interconnectedness of global, regional, national, and local realities, as they affect the lives of people in everyday domains. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.

AAAS 480V From Bombay to Bollywood - Mehta - M/W 2:20-3:45

This course will trace the trajectory of Bombay cinema's transformation into Bollywood. The products of the Bombay film industry, Hindi films, have dominated the national imagination. Furthermore, they have been Indian cinema's most successful exports. Through readings and screenings, we will examine shifts in Hindi films' narratives as well as Bombay's industry practices. Some of the topics that we will explore include film exhibition, the development of melodrama, censorship, the emergence of the multi-starrer, the shifts in music and dance, the representation of political events, the construction of family and gender, the relationship between the Bombay film industry and the state, and the rise of new genres in the era of globalization. The discussions on specific films will attend to formal features of Hindi films such as narrative form, darsan, intermission, and song/dance sequences, placing Hindi films in productive dialogue with film theory. *Please note: Weekly 3 hour evening screenings will be mandatory for this course. There will be a separate time set aside for the screenings. The screenings may not take up the entire 3 hours.

AAAS 483C/580P - Chen - MW 4:40-6:05

Filipino boxers and pool sharks, Korean golfers and ice skaters, Chinese gymnasts and ping pong "playas," Japanese outfielders, Pakistani cricketers, and a certain "insanely" talented Taiwanese American point guard: Whether they hail from Asia or the United States (or elsewhere), whether male or female, whether gay or straight, and whether they engage professionally or recreationally, Asians can be and often are sports fanatics. All manner of sports are not only immensely popular among Asians but is vitally important to them. But what exactly makes an activity a sport? Why do people engage in sports? What value does sports have to the nation and the national consciousness? How does gender and sexuality manifest in sports? And what happens when sports travel to different locations or when a sport is taken up by a new community? Using Asians, Asian Americans, and Asians across the diaspora as case studies, and through multidisciplinary approaches and sources, this course examines these and other questions critical to better understanding the cultural politics of Asians in sports.  

AAAS 500 Proseminar - Kaldis - T 4:25-7:25

Required course for all incoming graduate students. This course will expose students to the breadth and variety of approaches to Asian & Asian American Studies. Students will be introduced to multiple conceptualizations of the field of Asian & Asian American Studies, including a wide array of disciplinary approaches to the field. Through a combination of extensive readings in combination with guest faculty lecturers from across these disciplines, first-semester MA students will develop knowledge and familiarity of the diversity of Asian & Asian American Studies, and begin to orient themselves toward a particular sub-field (from within the various MA tracks offered within the program), disciplinary approach, and DAAAS faculty mentor.

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Fall 2012 Language Courses

CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese I

Foundation course aimed at enabling students to communicate in Chinese for everyday purposes. Introduction to simplified Chinese characters. For students with no previous formal training in Chinese. Not for native speakers. Evaluation based on quizzes, examinations and class participation.

CHIN 111 Elementary Written Chinese I

An accelerated, concentrated beginning Chinese course designed for students with some background in conversational Chinese (Mandarin, Cantonese or other dialects) who require instruction in learning to write Chinese characters and in Chinese grammar. Students who have had no prior formal language instruction in Chinese are eligible for this course. Two hours per week; evaluation based on quizzes, examinations and class participation. Prerequisites: Knowledge of conversational Chinese and consent of instructor.

CHIN 202 Singing Chinese

Chinese 202, Singing Chinese Course Description This is a specially designed, interdisciplinary course, emphasizing both language acquisition and music appreciation and performance. The songs you will learn in this class are art songs, folk songs, and popular songs from the Mainland, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Song lyrics will serve as main texts, accompanied by vocabulary lists and exercises. You will learn new words and sentence patterns as in regular language classes, while the improvement of pronunciation, diction, voice projection, and language expression will be achieved through singing practice. You will go through a step-by-step learning progression, from "singing along" to "singing alone." In semester's end, although you are not expected to sing solo professionally, you will be able to sing with choral expertise and to actually please crowds at Karaoke sessions Prerequisites: CHIN 102 or equivalent.

CHIN 203 Intermediate Chinese I

This third-semester intermediate course in spoken and written Chinese builds upon vocabulary and grammar acquired in CHIN 101 and 102, or 111 and 112. While learning new vocabulary in culturally informative lessons, students will obtain mastery of increasingly complex sentence patterns and grammatical structures. The course stresses speaking, reading, writing and listening comprehension. At the end of the semester, students are able to communicate competently in Chinese on a limited range of important topics in everyday life and are able to read simple texts, and have a good foundational knowledge of Chinese culture, including a solid understanding of key aspects of the traditional Chinese writing system. Four hours per week; evaluation based on quizzes, examinations, written essays, weekly homework assignments, and class participation. Prerequisites: CHIN 102 or CHIN 112 or equivalent.

CHIN 305 Advanced Chinese I

This course is designed to help students solidify and further improve their communicative skills in Chinese through the study of authentic materials. Class will be conducted mainly in Chinese and will be active, intensive, and participatory. Stu dents will read authentic materials, expand their vocabularies, practice journal writing, and acquire knowledge of Chinese culture and modern society. Using dictionaries (Chinese, Chinese-English, hard copy, and online) will also be practiced.

JPN 101 Elementary Japanese I

Provides the basics of Japanese language to students with no prior background in this language and introduces aspects of Japanese culture and society. Includes training in speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing. Students learn basic grammar and expressions to communicate in simple Japanese, and learn the basic orthographical system. For freshmen, sophomores and juniors. Not for native speakers. Prerequisites: Freshman, sophomore or junior standing. Students with any background in Japanese are required to take a placement test on the first day of class.

JPN 203 Intermediate Japanese I

A third-semester course in the Japanese language, including reading, writing, listening comprehension, conversation and grammar study. Emphasis on how the language is used in the context of Japanese culture and society. More complex sentence patterns and different styles of speech are introduced; 150 new kanji are introduced. Prerequisites: JPN 102 or equivalent

JPN 305 Advanced Japanese I

Expansion and integration of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Close examination of short readings from various genres and acquisition of speech styles reflecting cultural context. Advanced kanji vocabulary through reading and writing exercises. Textbook is supplemented by authentic texts, audiotapes and video films. Prerequisites: JPN 204 or equivalent.

JPN 407 Fourth Year Japanese I 

This course trains students to read and understand authentic reading materials at the fourth year level. Discussion topics are drawn from contemporary sources, and students learn to discuss them using natural Japanese. The aim is for students to progress beyond textbook learning and develop greater proficiency in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Students will gain the proficiency to use Japanese to communicate at a near‐native level. Pre/Co‐requisites: JPN306 or satisfactory performance on a placement test.

KOR 101 Elementary Korean I

Elementary course in spoken and written Korean that aims at equipping students with some basic sentence patterns of Korean using basic vocabulary. Speaking, reading, writing and listening comprehension are all emphasized, with special attention to the spoken language. Students also develop the ability to exchange greetings, ask directions, tell time and carry on limited conversations in classrooms and stores.

KOR 102 Elementary Korean II

First-year Korean (four units) is a continuation of KOR 101 and the second part of the elementary course in spoken and written Korean, which aims at equipping students with some basic sentence patterns of Korean using basic vocabulary. Speaking, reading, writing and listening comprehension are all emphasized, with special attention to the spoken language. Students also develop the ability to exchange greetings, ask directions, tell time and carry on limited conversations in classrooms and stores.

KOR 111 Elementary (Speaking) Korean I

This two-credit course is designed to provide rudimentary speaking skills for learners that need additional mastery at an elementary level. It does not provide instruction in written Korean.

KOR 203 Intermediate Korean I

This is the intermediate course in spoken and written Korean, which provides students with more complex sentences in advanced grammatical patterns, assuming that students have acquired basic grammatical structures at an elementary level of Korean. Equal emphasis will be placed on speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension. At the end of semester, students will be able to communicate competently in Korean on a range of topics in everyday life, and to read simple texts, and they will have good knowledge of Korean culture.

KOR 305 Advanced Reading and Composition I

This is an advanced course in Korean language that aims to develop communicative competence in reading, writing, and listening.  Additionally, as classroom work is generally done in small groups, it is also designed to develop oral communication skills.  Through writing assignments and readings, students will learn more accurate syntactic, pragmatic ways of expression and logical ways of thinking in Korean, and through listening and taking dictation, students will learn more actuate orthography and correct commonly misused aspects of the language.  Prerequisite is KOR 204 or equal level of fluency.

KOR 411 Korean for Professionals I

This course is designed for upper-level undergraduates who are interested in learning the correct usage of Korean language and more thorough knowledge of Korean grammar, spelling and orthography, correct spacing  as well as useful expressions in Sino-Korean and idiomatic expressions.  Students will learn how to write Korean in a more professional manner and expand their knowledge about Korean language in general.

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Last Updated: 6/26/14