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Graduate Courses in Anthropology

Core Courses

ANTH 501, HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL THOUGHT

Thematic treatment of the development of anthropological thought, emphasizing a holistic approach to anthropology, with limited separation of the subdisciplines.

4 cr.

ANTH 504, CURRENT ISSUES AND DEBATES IN ANTHROPOLOGY

Critical examination of problems, definitions and methods in contemporary anthropology. Thematic foci include political economy, critical anthropology and ecological and biobehavioral anthropology.

4 cr.

Sociocultural Anthropology

ANTH 510, SOCIOCULTURAL THEORY

Current theoretical approaches in sociocultural anthropology, insights and errors of functionalism, structuralism, historical paradigms leading toward a theory of structured social practice (institutions, classes, etc.) situated in space-time.

ANTH 511, THE GLOBAL AND LOCAL IN ANTHROPOLOGY

Critically examines the different meanings of globalization and the impact of this process in anthropological thinking. Course also discusses other related concepts currently employed in anthropological research (e.g., transnationalism, locality, deterritorialization, hyperreality, postcoloniality, hybridity). Because globalization is a spatial category, we will pay particular attention to the way that thinking about space is making anthropologists redefine themselves.

ANTH 512, POLITICAL ECOLOGY

A critical examination of the development of environmentalism in the late 20th century and the new millennium. Concerned with the politics of ecology under capitalism; also focuses on cultural representations of nature and the current environmental crisis. Discussions address current debates on scarcity, population growth, sustainability, the privatization of nature, global warming, bioreligionalism, biopower, nature/capital, ecological movements, cities and nature, and environmental planning. Readings cover issues related to both the "green" and "brown" agendas and draw from various theoretical traditions in the social and human sciences.

ANTH 513, CONSUMPTION, CULTURE AND MODERNITY

Examines how and why consumption has become a central concern in social theory. Why have we shifted our focus from production to consumption? What is the relationship between the cultural turn and the interest in consumption? How is consumption related to current concerns with the individual, self and identity? How is the analysis of consumption linked to debates on modernity and post-modernity? Looks at the contributions from political, economic and cultural approaches to the examination of consumption. Discusses current debates on the meanings of the market, commodities, things and gifts.

ANTH 514, SEXUALITY STUDIES IN ANTHROPOLOGY

Focuses on the study of sexuality in varied sociocultural and historical contexts and from varied theoretical perspectives. We begin with an examination of the histories of sexuality studies, including the emergence of feminist sexuality studies and queer anthropology, and then turn our focus for the body of our seminar to engaging specific ethnographies and historical works in sexuality studies. Across our readings, we will give particular attention to the ways sexuality articulates through and is articulated by differences of race, class, gender, nation, and colonial experience, and thus with social power and relations of privilege and subordination. While this seminar does not explicitly focus on queer anthropology, we will substantively engage with the growing body of LGBTQ work in anthropology, including its relationships to feminist anthropology.

ANTH 516, EUROPEANIZATION AND EUROPEAN INTEGRATION

Examines the processes of Europeanization and European integration from anthropological perspectives. Reviews major themes in the historical, contemporary and comparative anthropology and ethnology of Europe, in order to develop a critical view on what role anthropologists might play in the analysis and understanding of transnationalism, globalization and supranationalism in Europe. Themes include migration and diaspora, regionalism, nationalism, ethnic conflict, popular culture, citizenship, sovereignty, heritage and tradition, and borderlands of identity and territory.

ANTH 518, ETHNOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS

Works of diverse ethnographers seen through perspective of sociology of knowledge. In-depth and individualized analysis of intellectual and social, historical and other non-intellectual forces that shape ethnographic research.

ANTH 519, ETHNOGRAPHY AND ETHNOHISTORICAL METHODS

Relationship between ethnohistory and anthropology. Sources, methods, conceptual issues.

ANTH 520, POLITICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Explores the historical development and contemporary practice of political anthropology within the British and American traditions of cultural and social anthropology since 1940. Examines the origins and evolution of the theoretical and methodological concerns that gave rise to modern political anthropology, and the relations between an anthropology of politics and the politics of anthropology. Among the theoretical, methodological and professional issues to be considered are: process and action theory, transactionalism, political economy, regional studies, local-state-nation analyses, neo-evolutionism, Marxist/Marxian approaches, political fields and networks, subaltern studies, colonialism and post-colonialism, globalization, nationalism, and borders and boundaries.

ANTH 521, ON VALUE

A look at how people imbue objects with value— through the judgments they make, through the meanings and prestige that are accrued as objects circulate within particular economic and symbolic economies, through the institutional processes by which hierarchies of value are produced, through the legal instrument of copyright, and so on. Examine the ways in which people accrue value through their relationships with objects— as they admire them, own them, produce them, and define their expertise through them. Considers various anthropological approaches to the question of value, not abstractly, but with particular reference to art, to the field that has been so insistent in its claim that its object, the artwork, is the bearer of essential value, and that those who recognize this value are blessed with inherently good taste.

ANTH 522, CULTURES OF COLLECTING

Collections are sites of appropriation and categorization whereby objects are called upon to tell particular stories about the world, and about the collector. We will examine these narratives historically, looking at both institutional and private practices of collecting, and the imperatives that underpin them. We will address questions of cultural stewardship, while also looking at issues of possession and desire.

ANTH 527, ANTHROPOLOGY OF ART AND MUSEUMS

This course frames the anthropology of art in an historical perspective while focusing on contemporary configurations of the field and its relationship to central preoccupations in socio-cultural anthropology. It covers such topics as the analysis of art practices within local ethnographic settings; the politics of art, representation, and display; art, aesthetics and the culture industry; the circulation of art objects, and the production of meaning and value within art-world institutions; patronage; museums and collecting.

ANTH 528, CRITICAL THEORY AND POST-MODERNISM

Ethnographic interpretation of the "other" informed by post-Marxist, post-structuralist, post-modernist literatures in anthropology. Limits of challenges to enlightenment rationality theorizing about the other and the self. "Decentered self" and the authority to represent (descriptively).

ANTH 530, STRATEGIES IN SOCIOCULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY I: FIELD METHODS

Field research, including ethics, politics and interpersonal relations; interviewing, survey, and observational procedures; quantitative methods.

ANTH 531, STRATEGIES IN SOCIOCULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY II: RESEARCH DESIGN AND ANALYSIS

Design of field research projects, including problems of operationalization and validity as well as methods of quantitative and non-quantitative data collection and analysis. Pragmatic outcome: writing research grant proposals. Prerequisite: ANTH 530.

ANTH 534, NATIONALISM, FEMINISM AND WOMEN

Examines the variety of feminisms developed by Third World feminists and the politics of Third World feminisms, particularly as these have taken (and take) shape in relation to nationalism, anti-colonial struggle and post-coloniality. Problematics we will pursue include: critical interrogation of the categories "women," "Third World," and "feminism;" the legacies of colonialism and import of imperialism and racisms for Third World feminist projects at their interfaces with nationalism, anti-colonial struggle, and postcolonial state-building; the varying relationships between theory, experience and identity in Third World feminisms and their politics; and knowledge production about and the politics of representing Third World women/feminisms/nationalism.

ANTH 537, SEMINAR: POLITICS OF ETHNICITY

Political implications of ethnic groups and boundaries; social processes that maintain ethnic units, exchange of values within and between ethnic units; recruitment and loss of personnel. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

ANTH 538, KINSHIP, GENDER AND SEXUALITY

Examines theories of power and difference through a focus on kinship, gender and sexuality. Organizing questions include: how kinship works to bind people to social structures, how the powerful bonds of kinship, with their signifying ties to gender and sexuality, are made available for larger social projects (community-building, nationalism, social policy, etc.), and produce exclusions as meanings grounded in everyday practices are redeployed to larger arenas; how kinship mediates relationships between nature and culture, and through that works to "naturalize" social differences (gender, race, sexuality, class) and systems of inequality. We ground our studies of kinship, gender and sexuality in readings on their places and uses in, for example, colonialism, decolonization, prostitution, queer subcultures, nation-building, "race" and racism, and new reproductive technologies.

ANTH 539, THE BODY

Emphasizes anthropological and feminist scholarship on "the body" that has worked to denaturalize the body by interrogating how bodies are produced as socially meaningful, how bodies are "read," and in what embodiment consists. Course readings use the body to examine: social theories of identity and difference and processes of subjectification, including shifts in their formation within conditions of post/modernity, postcoloniality and late capitalism; current approaches to gender and sexedness, sexuality and heteronormativity, racialization and racisms, and class; large-scale processes interpolated through specific bodies, such as colonialism, nationalism and neoliberalism and, more broadly, structures of inequality and the operations of power; cultural differences in understandings of the body and enactments of embodiment, helping us to explore comparative questions about materiality and performativity and about bodies as cultural artifacts.

ANTH 562, ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY

Empirically informed critical analyses of conceptualizations of "the economy" in historical and ethnographic descriptions.

ANTH 563, DEVELOPMENT ANTHROPOLOGY

Critical analyses of nature of development and underdevelopment at the beginning of the 21st century, emphasizing interrelationships among economic growth, environmental sustainability, human rights and cultural pluralism. Contributions of anthropology to development planning and praxis.

ANTH 570, TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

Particular themes and topics determined in advance. May be taken more than once if topic varies.

ANTH 571, SEMINAR IN SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

A. Religion and Symbolic Systems; B. Politics and Law; C. Cultures of Capitalism; D. The Individual in Society; E. Sociocultural Contexts of Anthropology; R. Religion and the State; S. Kinship, Gender and Sexuality. Extensive reading and discussion. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

ANTH 575, SEMINAR IN ETHNOGRAPHIC AREA STUDIES

Reading and discussion of ethnography, research on problems in ethnology of a specified geographic area. A. The Contemporary U.S.; B. Africa; C. India; D. Pacific; E. Southeast Asia; F. Latin America; G. North America; H. Caribbean; J. Middle East. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

ANTH 579, SEMINAR IN FEMINIST ANTHROPOLOGY

Extensive reading and discussion of selected literature within feminist anthropology. A. Nationalism and Women in the 'Third World'; B. Gender, Culture and Violence; C. Women in the Middle East; D. Women in Culture; G. The Body; H. Sexuality Studies. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

ANTH 584, PRACTICUM IN ETHNOGRAPHIC FIELD RESEARCH

Small-scale field research projects carried out locally. Prerequisites: ANTH 530 and consent of instructor.

Archaeology

ANTH 529, SPACE, TIME AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Critical examination of space and time as constructs that are constituted in social actions and that produce and reproduce culture. Focus on material culture, the built environment and cultural landscapes.

ANTH 551, STRATEGIES OF ARCHAEOLOGY

Archaeological methods in general context. Research design, use of ethnographic and ethnohistoric data in model-building, planning and organization of field work, sampling, data control, laboratory methods.

ANTH 552, HISTORY OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE

Changing archaeological field techniques, laboratory techniques, typological concepts, interpretive concepts; changing understanding of neolithic and urban revolutions.

ANTH 554, ARCHAEOLOGICAL STUDY OF CULTURAL SYSTEMS

Theoretical approaches to archaeological problems. Evaluations of such topics as Marxism, feminist theory and evolution in archaeological research. B. Stone Age Archaeology; C. Urban and State Societies; D. Marxism and Archaeology' F. Feminism and Archaeology; G. Political Economy; H. Archaeology of Households; I. Archaeology and Ideology; M. Agency and Archaeology. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

ANTH 576, PROBLEMS IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL AREA STUDIES

Extensive reading and discussion. A. Middle East; C. North America; D. South America; E. Africa; J. Southeastern United States; K. Southwestern United States; L. Historical Archaeology; M. Amazonian Archaeology. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

ANTH 583, PRACTICA IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL METHODS

In-depth experience in specific analytical tasks common to day-to-day work of archaeology. Particular themes and topics determined in advance. A. Ceramic Analysis; B. Lithic Analysis; C. Zooarchaeology and Taphonomy; E. Spatial Analysis; F. Chronometric Techniques; M. Mortuary Analysis; R. Microwear Analysis; T. Classification; Z. Advanced Quantitative Methods. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

ANTH 585, CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT – POLICY AND PROCEDURES

Various cultural resources related to present management regulations and practices, legal and political obligations, present contracting practices of federal and state agencies. Management process, case studies to evaluate present state of the art in this application of anthropological science.

4 cr.

Biological Anthropology

ANTH 515, EVOLUTIONARY THEORY

Basic principles, general body of theory within evolution. Human population dynamics, modern genetic synthesis. Background for further studies in biological anthropology.

ANTH 540, HUMAN SKELETAL BIOLOGY

Skeletal anatomy and related aspects of human skeletal biology. Comparative and evolutionary perspectives. Sex- and age-determination from bone, pathology, biometry; applications to paleodemographic population reconstruction.

ANTH 541, BIOLOGY OF PRIMATES

Biology and behavior of humankind's primate relatives. Classification, ecology, functional and comparative anatomy of living primates; evolution of the primate order. Monkey and ape social behavior; aspects of communication and intelligence.

ANTH 542, HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Variation in human growth during the life cycle; biobehavioral aspects of growth; individual and population processes; genetic, environmental and secular influences on growth.

ANTH 543, HUMAN BIOLOGICAL VARIATION

Processes and origins of human biological variation and adaptation. Developmental, phenotypic, hereditary, gender, individual, population, evolutionary, ecological and random sources of human variation. Human responses to adaptation and environment.

ANTH 544, METHODS IN FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY

Combines literature reviews with intensive laboratory analyses of human skeletal remains for the purpose of personal identification. Methods of skeletal identification are practiced, including the estimation of age, sex, stature and ancestry. Emphasizes designing and implementing experimental research projects to address specific problems in forensic anthropology. Prerequisite: ANTH 540.

ANTH 545, HUMAN ADAPTABILITY

Method and theory in biological patterns of adaptation of humans to environment. Problem orientation and research preparation in areas of health, nutrition, reproduction, climatic tolerance, growth, physical performance. Approaches to individual, population and ecosystem levels.

ANTH 546, HUMAN PALEONTOLOGY

Systematics and principles of classifying organisms. The evolution of hominoid primates. Australopithecines and early members of the genus Homo. Homo erectus and human evolution in the Pleistocene. Independent work required.

ANTH 547, ANTHROPOLOGICAL GENETICS

Problem-oriented study of theory and methods of population genetics of humans. Mathematical analyses on consequences of mating practices, consanguinity, genetic drift, population isolation and selection.

ANTH 548, DEMOGRAPHIC ANTHROPOLOGY

Relationship between fertility and mortality; biological and socio-cultural determinants. Topics include fertility limitation, "natural fertility," infant and child mortality, proximate determinants of fertility and mortality, relationship between culture and demography, population "problem." Demographic measures and techniques.

ANTH 549, MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Health and disease in bio-cultural perspective; evolutionary, ecological and socio-cultural contexts of health and disease. Interactions between evolutionary forces shaping the human body and social configurations affecting contemporary patterns of health and disease. Macro-level and micro-level approaches.

ANTH 550, CO-EVOLUTION OF HUMANS AND PATHOGENS

The impact of both infectious and non-infectious diseases on human populations, from the earliest modern humans to today, is examined through the interpretation of skeletal lesions and the application of paleopathological theory, epidemiological models and paleodemographic principles. The evolution of infectious diseases in humans is studied as a complex interaction of cultural, biological and environmental changes in both pathogen and host. Although malaria is one of the best understood examples of biocultural co-evolution, we will also examine the origin, spread and current epidemiology of tuberculosis, syphilis, leprosy and a number of mycotic diseases that impact agricultural and developing populations. The frequency of osteoarthritis, trauma and other non-infectious skeletal insults will also be examined in relation to cultural change over time. Emphasis will be placed on differential diagnosis of skeletal pathological conditions in laboratory sessions.

ANTH 559, MOLECULAR ANTHROPOLOGY

Recent advances in evolutionary genetics have enabled an understanding of the human condition within the framework of molecular evolution. The basic principles of evolutionary genetics and phylogenetics are reviewed and human population histories are explored from this perspective through student presentations. Culminates in the design of molecular anthropology research proposals.

ANTH 572, SEMINAR IN BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Basic concepts and current literature related to method, theory and analysis A. History of Biological Anthropology; B. Methods in Biological Anthropology; C. Human Affairs and Evolution; D. Dental Anthropology; E. Research Integrity and Ethics; F. Ancient DNA Lab; J. Stress, Chronobiology; K. International Health; L. Laboratory Practicum in Biomedical Anthropology; M. Molecular Anthropology; N. Molecular Lab; P. Phylogenetics and Molecular Evolution; R. Epidemiology; S. Advanced Statistics: Multivariate May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

ANTH 573, LABORATORY METHODS IN BIOMEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

In depth experience in specific analytical and field or laboratory based tasks common to the conduct of research in biological anthropology. Special topics or themes to be announced in advance. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Laboratory Methods 1. Basic laboratory methods in biomedical anthropology including molecular genetic techniques. Recent, historic and ancient DNA studied by gel electrophoresis, nucleic acid isolation, purification, sequencing, PCR and cell biology techniques. Cell culture and basic serology. fall Laboratory Methods 2. Advanced techniques in biomedical anthropology including molecular approaches such as cloning and sub-cloning, nucleic acid screening, restriction mapping, protein purification and sequencing. Advanced serological methods. Prerequisite: ANTH 573A

Linguistic Anthropology

ANTH 517, LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY

Application of linguistic concepts, techniques, findings to wide range of anthropological topics.

ANTH 523, COGNITIVE ANTHROPOLOGY

Language, culture, cognition. Analytic principles of ethnographic semantics. Native systems of classification. Structure of psycho-cultural reality. Folk theory, cultural knowledge systems.

ANTH 524, SEMINAR IN LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY

Extensive reading and discussion of selected literatures in linguistic anthropology. C. Language, Power and Identity E. Ethnography of Speaking F. Sociolinguistic Theory and Research P. Psycholinguistics T. Neurolinguistics

ANTH 525, SEMIOTIC APPROACHES TO LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

Introduction to semiotic theories of meaning in anthropology, linguistics, and other related fields. Focuses on the contextual mediation of cultural meaning through various typologies of signs. Different semiotic methods and techniques contrasted. Analyses developed for broadly cultural and specifically linguistic projects. Problems of interpretation and their relation to science explored throughout.

ANTH 526, LANGUAGE AND IDENTITY

Examines theoretical and ethnographic perspectives on the role of language ideologies and practices in shaping cultural dynamics of community, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, and nation; linkages between identity formation and everyday speech practices, including code-switching, crossing, register and accent; readings drawn from post-structuralist theory, cultural and linguistic anthropology.

ANTH 568, LANGUAGE AND DEVELOPMENT

Role of language in development, with particular attention to impact of language decisions on identity of the state and society and on patterns of access to power, wealth and prestige. Comparison of policy and anthropological approaches to language and to relations between languages; examination of "pragmatic" and "expressive" roles of language in development, both at national and local levels.

Independent Study, Teaching and Research

ANTH 580, ISSUES IN TEACHING COLLEGE ANTHROPOLOGY

Philosophical issues in teaching anthropology in college settings. Practical issues involving curriculum and course design, methods and materials for presenting anthropology in the classroom, and evaluation and improvement of one's own teaching.

1-2 cr.

ANTH 587, QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

Descriptive and inferential statistics and their use in anthropological problems. Computer applications in quantitative anthropological research.

ANTH 590, WRITING SKILLS AND PUBLICATION

A practical course in writing for students working on theses or wishing to revise papers for publication. Writing as process.

2 cr.

ANTH 591, PRACTICUM IN TEACHING ANTHROPOLOGY

Individual supervision of beginning teachers. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only.

1-4 cr.

ANTH 592, PROPOSAL WRITING

Writing of research and grant proposals.

2 cr.

ANTH 595, INTERNSHIP

Consists of laboratory work, fieldwork or non-field, non-lab based experience on or off-campus. Requires consent of faculty adviser and an internship supervisor at the agency or lab or field site where the experience will take place. Students must maintain a journal or lab notebook and are required to submit at the completion of the internship a paper/project/report based on their internship experience. May be repeated once.

1-4 cr.

ANTH 597, INDEPENDENT STUDY

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

1-4 cr.

ANTH 599, THESIS

Research for and preparation of a master's thesis, or two papers in lieu of a thesis. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only.

1-4 cr.

ANTH 698, PRE-DISSERTATION RESEARCH

Independent reading and or research in preparation for comprehensive examinations for admission to PhD candidacy, and/or preparation of dissertation prospectus. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only.

1-9 cr.

ANTH 699, DISSERTATION

Research for and preparation of the dissertation. Prerequisite: previous or concurrent completion of all requirements for PhD candidacy, including submission of dissertation prospectus. S/U grading only.

1-9 cr.

ANTH 700, CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION

Required for maintenance of matriculated status in graduate program. Prerequisites: approval of principal adviser, director of graduate studies, and vice provost and dean of the Graduate School. Not applicable toward graduate degree requirements.

1 cr.

ANTH 707, RESEARCH SKILLS

Development of research skills required within graduate programs. May not be applied toward course credits for any graduate degree. Prerequisite: approval of relevant graduate program directors or department chairs.

1-4 cr.

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Last Updated: 9/4/14