Graduate Students in Anthropology

 

Maura Bainbridge   Maura Bainbridge

   MA/PhD student
   Archaeologist
   mbainbr1@binghamton.edu
Year Admitted: 2013
Advisor: Dr. Randall McGuire

My research focuses on sites of labor struggle in the United States, particularly comparing Homestead, Pennsylvania, Ludlow, Colorado, and the Pullman district of Chicago. I am interested in contemporary archaeology, community archaeologies, and post industrial landscapes.


Tai Basilius

PhD student
Biological Anthropologist
tbasili1@binghamton.edu
Year Admitted: 2013
Advisor: Koji Lum


 

Priscilla Bennett

  Priscilla A. Bennett

   PhD student
   Sociocultural Anthropologist
   pbennet1@binghamton.edu
   Year Admitted: 2010
   Advisor: Douglas R. Holmes

Research Interests

Innovative biotechnologies have recently surfaced in the biomedical industry. A novel technology known as the OX513A, a genetically engineered mosquito for the prevention of dengue fever and other mosquito-borne illnesses, has made its presence known in Key West, Florida. As company and local officials attempt to gain regulatory approval and public acceptance of this groundbreaking technology, a new model for global public health is emerging. My ethnographic research attempts to delineate how the proposal for experimental trials of a genetically engineered mosquito is creating a globally transferrable technical and social model for a novel mosquito eradication and disease prevention method. The recruitment of the public and the establishment of expectations surrounding this technology in a local context are critical to its global implementation and success.

Grants and Awards

2015  Rosa Colecchio Travel Award for Dissertation Research Enhancement. Binghamton University.

2014  Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship. Making the Biotech Body: Technologies, Knowledge, and Global Markets. Social Science Research Council.

Presentations

2014  Multispecies Relations and the Globally Manufactured Mosquito: Preventing Dengue through Biogenetic Engineering in Key West 

(American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting)

2013  Creating Expertise: The Construction of Regulatory Policy for Transgenic Animals

(Master's Level Graduate Research Conference, The College at Brockport, SUNY)


 

Kaitlyn E. Bower  Kaitlyn Elise Bower

   MA/PhD student
   Biological Anthropologist
   kbower1@binghamton.edu  
   Year admitted: MS (2012), MA/PhD (2014)
   Advisor: Michael A. Little

Research Interests

My research interests mainly deal with the effects of modernization on health in regards to chronic and infectious disease burdens as well as growth and development, especially in regards to maternal and childhood health. I also have an interest in evolutionary medicine and approaches to health. I am currently involved with ongoing research on the Vanuatu Health Transitions Project and the Lyme and Other Tick-Borne Disease Project.

Conference Presentations

K Bower, A Pomer, KM Olszowy, C Sun, G Lee, CW Chan, H Silverman, KN Dancause, L Tarivonda, G Taleo, M Abong, R Regenvanu, A Kaneko, C Weitz, JK Lum, RM Garruto. 2015. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and its relationship with muscle and fat composition in Vanuatu. Fortieth annual meeting of the Human Biology Association, St. Louis, Missouri, March 25-26.

K Bower, A Roome, KM Olszowy, D Ngwele, L Tarivonda, JK Lum, KN Dancause, RM Garruto. 2014. Evaluating obesity using waist to height ratio as a predictor of cardiometabolic disease risk in adult Melanesians in Vanuatu. Thirty-ninth annual meeting of the Human Biology Association, Calgary, Canada, April 9-10. American Journal of Human Biology. 26(2): 260-261; also in Abstracts from the 2014 Binghamton University Research Days, March 28.

A Roome, K Bower, CG Murnock, L Hill, B Ho, S Tyurin, V Al-Feghali, H Zeitz , D Rios, R Parwez, I Li, A Leighton, K Lupo, Y Hao, C Pabafikos, J Goodsell, N Scher, S Daivs, T Lamendola, R Singh, J Ma, N DeLeon, JM Darcy II, R Spathis, RM Garruto. 2014. Prevalence of tick-borne pathogens and human behavioral risk factors in built environments of upstate New York suggest a necessity for the development of risk management models. Thirty-ninth annual meeting of the Human Biology Association, Calgary, Canada, April 9-10. American Journal of Human Biology. 26(2): 279.

KM Olszowy, A Roome, K Bower, D Ngwele, L Tarivonda, JK Lum, KN Dancause, RM Garruto. 2014. Understanding the impact of maternal obesity on childhood nutritional status in an urban Ni-Vanuatu community. Thirty-ninth annual meeting of the Human Biology Association, Calgary, Canada, April 9-10. American Journal of Human Biology. 26(2): 276.


 

Claire Brown  Claire J. Brown

   PhD student
   Sociocultural Anthropologist
   cbrown18@binghamton.edu
   Year admitted: 2011
   Advisor:  Thomas Wilson

Research Interests

My research studies the social and economic centrality of the Connemara pony in western Irish society, and the ways in which the pony influences social networks on a regional and international level. I analyze the changing nature of the pony in a localized context, and how this can be writ large as a symbol of the negotiation of Irish identity in both national and international realms. On a more general level, I am interested in human-animal interaction, and how human relationships with animals define social relationships and our understanding of nature and culture.

I am also involved in an ongoing archaeological field project entitled, "The Cultural Landscapes of the Irish Coast", headed by Dr. Ian Kuijt of the Anthropology Department at the University of Notre Dame. This project combines multiple archaeological techniques as well as cultural
investigations to provide a holistic understanding of life in the coastal Connemara region of Ireland.

Grants and Awards

2012  Binghamton University Department of Anthropology Summer Research Stipend.

2011  National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. Project Title: Globalization of the Local: The Connemara Pony as a Symbol of Irish Identity Negotiation. Three-year supported fellowship.

Publications

2015   "From Working to Winning: The Shifting Symbolic Value of Connemara Ponies in the West of Ireland." [Claire J. Brown] In The Meaning of Horses: Biosocial Encounters, Dona Lee Davis and Anita Maurstad, editors. London: Routledge Publishing Company.

2015   "Vectors of Improvement: The Archaeological Footprint of 19th and 20th century Irish National Policy, Inishark, Co. Galway, Ireland." [Ian Kuijt, Meagan Conway, Katie Shakour, Casey McNeill and Claire Brown] International Journal of Historical Archaeology 19(1): 122-158.

2009   "A New Generation." [Carolyn Nordstrom; including excerpt by Claire Brown] Notre Dame Magazine Winter 2008-2009 37(4): 25.

Conference presentations

2015  Into the Field: A Multispecies Examination of Connemara Ponies in Western Ireland. Oral paper presentation at the Association of Social Anthropologists of the UK and Commonwealth Annual Meeting. University of Exeter, United Kingdom. April 13-16, 2015.

2015  Breeding Heritage: Intersections of Tradition and Modernity in the Connemara Pony Industry. Oral paper presentation at the Anthropological Association of Ireland Annual Meeting. University College Cork, Ireland. March 6-7, 2015.

2013   Hoofed Commodities: The Value of the Connemara Pony in Irish Economies. Oral paper presentation at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting. Chicago, IL. November 20-24, 2013.

2012   The Politics of Producing Ponies: Local-Global Dynamics in the Connemara Pony Industry. Oral paper presentation at the Anthropological Association of Ireland Annual Meeting. Royal Irish Academy, Dublin, Ireland. December 6-7, 2012.

2011   Show Ring Status: The Negotiation of Social Capital through Connemara Pony Breeding and Showing. Oral paper presentation and Session Chair for ‘Producing the Self, Producing the Nation’ at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting. Montréal, Canada. November 16-20, 2011.


2010  The Commodification of Heritage: The Changing Role of the Connemara Pony in Western Irish Society. Oral Paper presentation at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting. New Orleans, Louisiana. November 16-21, 2010.


 

Victoria L. Brown  Victoria Leigh Brown

   PhD Student
   Sociocultural Anthropologist
   vbrown4@binghamton.edu  
   Year admitted: 2011
   Advisor: Carmen A. Ferradás

Research Interests

My research draws on socialist feminist and political economic frameworks as a way to analyze feminized international migration patterns in advanced capitalism. I center my work on the industrialized plastic greenhouse agriculture of Almería, Spain. My research specifically looks at the experiences of migrant women who uproot their lives to work in the highly exploitative sector of intensive export-oriented agriculture. I am interested in the ways that cross-border circuits of global capital and labor render migrant women seasonally available, while maintaining their labor hidden and undervalued. I hope to show, through ethnographic portrayals of women’s daily thoughts, aspirations, and struggles to life, how hierarchies of gender and power are maintained through the temporary and flexible supply of migrant working women, and likewise, how these women are transforming notions of southern Spanish ruralities.

Fieldwork

Victoria was in the field from Sept. 2015 to June 2016 where she taught in the Spanish public school system and conducted preliminary dissertation research with the women who pick and package Europe’s fruits and vegetables. She plans to return to Almería in Fall 2017.

Elected Office

2013-2015: Business Agent for Binghamton, Graduate Student Employee's Union (GSEU)/CWA Local 1104 – Negotiating Team Chief Representative for Binghamton with NY Governor’s Office of Employee Relations

Awards and Grants

2011-2016: Teaching Assistant, Anthropology, SUNY Binghamton

2015-2016: Cultural Ambassador, Programa de Auxiliares de Conversación Extranjero, Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture, and Sport, Almería, Spain

Publications

2012    Hyatt, Susan B. (with Victoria as a contributing author) “The Neighborhood of Saturdays: Memories of a Multi-Ethnic Community on Indianapolis’ South Side”. Dog Ear Publishing: Indianapolis, IN.

2012    Scott, Patricia, and Victoria L. Brown  “Resumption of valued occupations in the first year post-liver transplant” Journal of Clinical Transplantation.


 

Şule Can  Şule Can

   PhD student
   Sociocultural Anthropologist
   Fulbright Scholar - Instructor of Record
   scan3@binghamton.edu
Advisor: Thomas Wilson

Şule Can is a PhD candidate and is currently writing her dissertation.  Şule's dissertation project focuses on one of the Turkish-Syrian border cities –Antakya-.  She specifically examines the emergence of ethno-religious conflict in the city in response to Turkish state practices after 2011 between local residents of Hatay and the displaced Syrians. The project explores political opposition and their impacts on claiming a 'right to the city' by looking at how the refugees and ethno-religious minorities grapple with the transformation of the city since the Syrian Civil War.  Şule is a columnist and the founder of a Institute for the Middle Eastern Arab Peoples in Turkey.

Grants and Awards:

Can is a Fulbright scholar and a Wenner-Gren grantee and has just completed her fieldwork at the border.

Publications:

Can, Şule 2015.  Talk To It: Memory and Material Agency in Arab-Alawite (Nusayri) Community In Practicing Materiality, ed. Ruth Van Dyke, University of Arizona Press.

In Turkish:

Can, Şule 2015.  (forthcoming) Antakya’nın Yarası, Yurtdışı Kapısı: Erkek Göçmenlik ve Kadın Sorunu ed. Hakan Mertcan, Iletisim Yayinlari, Istanbul.


 

Jiaying Chen  Jiaying Chen

   PhD student
   Sociocultural Anthropologist
   jchen50@binghamton.edu

 

For the past year, I've been working on my master's thesis, "The Politics of Demolishing a Neighborhood -- Development, Modernization and Globalization," which attempts to investigate the mechanism of China's frenetic urban development over the past 20 years and how it is intertwined with the national narratives of development, modernization and globalization.

I successfully held my colloquium at the end of last semester and I am currently doing fieldwork in China during the summer.


 

Robert Champion  Robert C. Champion, III

   MS student
   Biomedical Anthropologist
   rchampi1@binghamton.edu
   Year admitted: 2015

Advisor: Koji Lum

Broadly, my interests relate to human health and disease. I am interested in how biological, environmental and cultural factors influence health status and how each factor contributes to health outcomes in specific populations.  Currently, I collaborate on two projects at Binghamton University: Lyme disease research in New York State and health transitions in the Republic of Vanuatu (Melanesia).  I apply an interdisciplinary approach to these research questions and other human health dilemmas.  This approach draws from various disciplines including public health, anthropology, biology, sociology, and systems science.  I believe an integrative approach offers a more inclusive and holistic understanding of human health and disease relationships.      
https://sites.google.com/a/umail.iu.edu/robert-champion/

 

Tanya Chiykowski  Tanya Chiykowski

   MA/PhD student
   Archaeologist
   tchiyko1@binghamton.edu
   Year admitted: 2011
   Advisor: Randy McGuire

Research Interests

My PhD focuses on ceramic petrography of Cerro de Trincheras ceramics to determine the role of ceramic production on community identity in the late prehistoric period. It examines the interactions of gender, warfare and labor in intercultural interactions.

MA thesis focuses on village community organization and domestic life in an early agricultural site in Chihuahua, Mexico.

Teaching interest in the use of archaeology to instill critical thinking skills through interpretation and use of the past.

Recent Awards

2015  Amerind Foundation- Visiting Scholar
2015  Linda Cordell Student Paper Prize- 3rd Place
2014  National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant
2014  Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society Research Grant

Recent Academic Presentations

2015  Trade, Migration and Movement at Cerro de Trincheras, Sonora, Mexico. Society for American Archaeologists 80th Annual Meeting
2014  Ceramic production and trade at Cerro de Trincheras, Sonora, Mexico. Society for American Archaeologists 79th Annual Meeting
2013  Technology of style and captives: Implications for the production of ceramics in Sonora, Mexico. Chacmool Conference: Archaeology of Trade, Migration and Interaction.
2011  Changing perspectives in pithouse architecture. In invited session-Perpetual Changes: Chihuahuan Archaeology Since 1990. Chacmool Conference
2011  Domestic production and lithic analysis from Northwest Mexico. Society for American Archaeologists 76th Annual Meeting

Publications

2015  Tanya Chiykowski: Animacy of the Everyday: Materiality, Bundling and the Production of quotidian ceramics. In Practicing Materiality, edited by Ruth M. Van Dyke. University of Arizona Press.
2013  Tanya Chiykowski. Worked Lithics recovered in 2010. In The Viejo Period in West-Central Chihuahua, edited by Jane H. Kelley and Richard D. Garvin, pp. 85-88. Maxwell Museum Technical Series No.19, Albuquerque, NM.
In Press:  Technologies of Style and Captives: Implications for the Production of Ceramics in Sonora, Mexico. In Trading Spaces: The Archaeology of Interaction, 46th Annual Chacmool Conference, edited by Jessica Manion and Margie Patton. Chacmool Publications, Calgary.


 

Hunter Claypatch  Hunter Claypatch

   MA/PhD student
   Archaeologist
   hclaypa1@binghamton.edu
                       Year admitted: 2016
                       Advisor: Dr. Randy McGuire

Research Interests

My research interests focus on prehistoric ceramic production, and settlement patterns, in the region now encompassing the US/Mexico borderlands (specifically that of northern Sonora and Chihuahua).  I have spent the past several years working as a field archaeologist in the southwest United States and have presented on ceramic assemblages of both the upper San Juan and middle Rio Grande.

I also have an interest in 19th century sporting communities of the United States and Great Britain, and have extensively researched American bare-knuckle boxing of the mid-1800s.

Conference Poster/Presentations

2016  Analysis of a late Developmental to Coalition Period ceramic assemblage in Bernalillo County, New Mexico (LA 151618).  Poster presented at the Pecos Conference, Alpine, Arizona (with C. Dean Wilson). 

2016  Preliminary analysis of brown ware pottery from the Dillard site (5MT10647).  Poster presented at the 2nd Biennial Navajo Nation Archaeology Meeting, Shiprock, New Mexico (with Kari Schleher).

2015  Brown Ware Pottery during the Basketmaker III period: Preliminary results from the Dillard site (5MT10647).  Poster presented at the Pecos Conference, Mancos, Colorado (with Kari Schleher).

2011  Obsidian Trade and the formation of figurine continuity between Crete and the Cyclades during the Late Neolithic to Early Bronze Age.  Paper presented at the 25th National Conference on Undergraduate Research, Ithaca, New York.


 

Rui Gomez Coelho  Rui Gomes Coelho

   PhD student
   Archaeologist
   rgcoelho@binghamton.edu
   Year admitted: 2011
   Advisor:  Randall H. McGuire

Research interests

Current research interests include the archaeology of slavery in the coffee landscapes of the 19th century Paraíba Valley (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil); the archaeology of colonialism and decolonization; historical archaeology of the Amazon basin; community-based archaeologies and social history of archaeology.

Grants and Awards

2012- Doctoral fellowship (SFRH/BD/78009/2011) - Foundation for Science and Technology – Ministry of Education and Science, Portugal.

2011-2012 Doctoral fellowship – Fulbright Commission, Portugal.

2011 PCI research grant (Nº. 170171/2010-8) - Ministry for Science and Technology & Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi, Brazil. Project: Archaeology of the first interactions between Amerindians and Europeans in Amazonia (16th-18th centuries).


 

Zachary R. Critchley  Zachary R. Critchley

   PhD student
   Archaeologist
   zcritch1@binghamton.edu
   Year admitted: 2014
   Advisor: Dr. William H. Isbell

Research Interests
I am an archaeologist focusing on the Andes, though I still haven't decided my favorite area. I'm quite interested in spear-throwers and am currently working on a project on the symbolic significance of spear-throwers as expressed in Andean iconography. I'm also interested in constructions of space, expressions of power through architecture and access, and craft production.

Publications & Presentations       

2015    Explorations of Public Space at the Site of Panquilma. Paper presented at the 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, CA

2014    Excavations in the Public Sector During the 2013 Season at the Site of Panquilma. Paper presented at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Austin, TX

2013    Textile Production and Distribution at Panquilma. Paper presented at the 78th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Honolulu, HI

2013b  Aztecs and Their Ancestors, Spring 2013.
             Department of Anthropology, Franklin & Marshall College.
             Invited guest lecture: “Aztec Warfare” and Atlatl Demonstration

2012    Selling the Past. In The Kituhwan. Edited by Sarah Mills. Student publication, Franklin & Marshall College

 


Sarah Cunningham  Sarah Cunningham

   PhD student
   Biological Anthropologist
   scunnin4@binghamton.edu
   Year Admitted: 2010
   Advisor: Koji Lum

 I am a biological anthropology PhD student with interests in molecular anthropology, bioarchaeology, forensic anthropology, taphonomy/bone preservation, non-metric skeletal trait variation, skeletal change due to secular change and admixture, pathology, archaeology of the Southeastern US, societal collapse, and genocide studies. My current research focus is studying microbacteria community succession within a postmortem setting to determine time since death.

Publications

Ross, A.H. and Cunningham, S.L. 2011. Time-since-death and bone weathering in a tropical environment. Forensic Science International. Vol. 204 (1): 126-133.

Cunningham, S.L.; Kirkland, S.; and Ross, A. "Bone Weathering of Juvenile-Sized Remains in the North Carolina Piedmont". The Juvenile Skeleton in Forensic Abuse Investigations, eds. Ann H. Ross and Suzanne M. Abel. 2011.

Reiber, E. and Cunningham, S.L. "Absorbed Residue Analysis from the George Reeves site (11S650), an Emergent Mississippian blufftop settlement". Hanneke Hoeffman-Sites and Maria Raviele edited volume (in press).

Conference Presentations

2010 Bone weathering of child sized remains in the central Piedmont region of North Carolina, USA. 5th Annual One-Day Symposium for the Forensic Anthropology Society of Europe, Copenhagen, Denmark (with S. Kirkland and A. Ross).

2010 Septal Aperture Rates Among the Pee Dee of Town Creek Mound, Mt. Gilead, North Carolina. 37th Annual Paleopathology Association Meeting, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

2009 Bone Weathering in the North Carolina Piedmont: Pigs as Proxies for Human Juvenile Remains. The 2nd Annual NCSU Forensic Science Symposium, NC State, Raleigh, NC and the 6th Annual North Carolina State University Graduate Research Symposium, NC State, Raleigh, NC (with A. Ross).

2009 Determining Row vs. Ray Development through Adult Hand Correlation. The 5th Annual North Carolina State University Graduate Research Symposium, NC State, Raleigh, NC (with S. Kirkland).

Outreach Presentations

2010 “Introduction to Forensic Anthropology”. Discovery and Recovery: Death in Natural Environments crime scene investigation workshop, NC State, Raleigh, NC (with S. Kirkland, A. Humphries, and J. Stone)

2010 “Introduction to Forensic Anthropology”. North Carolina Central University Law School visitation program, NC State, Raleigh, NC (with S. Kirkland, A. Offenbecker)

2010 “Introduction to Forensic Anthropology”. Cary Academy visitation program, NC State, Raleigh, NC (with S. Kirkland, A. Offenbecker)

2009 “An Introduction to the Human Skeleton and Physical Anthropology”. Creating Awareness of Agriculture and Life Science Disciplines, Discoveries and Degrees (CAALS3D) North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics visitation program, NC State, Raleigh, NC (with S. Kirkland)

2009 “An Introduction to the Human Skeleton and Physical Anthropology”. Champs Visitation Program, NC State, Raleigh, NC (with S. Kirkland)

Fieldwork

Summer 2009 Lopburi, Thailand (biological archaeology field work)


 

Kate DeRosa  Kate DeRosa

   MA/PhD student
   Biological Anthropologist
   kderosa3@binghamton.edu
   Year admitted: 2014
   Advisor: Koji Lum

Research Interests

My research interests lie in molecular anthropology, genomics, and evolutionary anthropology. I am currently working on the Genographic Project in the Laboratory of Evolutionary Anthropology and Health, focusing on mitochondrial haplogroups in highland Papua New Guinea.

Publications

Cardinale, D., DeRosa, K., Duffy, S. (2013). "Diverse Factors Drive Codon Usage Bias in Plant Viruses". Viruses, 5:162-181.

Presentations

2016  DeRosa, K.L., LI, M., Mann, H., Schutta, S. Roome, A., Guo, W., Castellanos, D., Bender, S. Echart, J., Casey, K., Shamoon-Pour, M., Dulin, H., Spathis, R., Garruto, R.M., Lum, J.K. (2015). “MtDNA analysis reveals restricted gene flow between highland and coastal populations of Papua New Guinea”. HBA.

2015  Scott, R.S., DeRosa, K., Rogers, M.A. "Cooking and sugar bioaccessibility from starch in human evolution". AAPA.

2014  DeRosa, K., Hong-Seok, H., Scott, R., & Xing, J. "Global survey of PGA indicates high CNV variability across human populations". AAPA.

2013  Zhou, Z., Ward, D., Shapiro, D., Hlubik, S., DeRosa, K., Hoffman D., Vogel, E. and Scott, R."Food material properties, meat-eating, and cooking in human evolution". AAPA.


 

Kate Ellenberger  Kate Ellenberger

   PhD student
   Archaeologist
   kellenb1@binghamton.edu
   Year admitted: 2009
   Advisor: Siobhan Hart

Curriculum vitae (download PDF file)

2009 B.A. Anthropology, Western Washington University
Advisor: Dr. Sarah Campbell

Research interests:

- community-based archaeology
- production and presentation of archaeological knowledge
- indigenous archaeologies
- colonial period New England
- historiography of colonization

Professional activities:

- June 2012-present North American Representative, Student Committee, World Archaeological Congress
- May 2012-present Librarian and Computer Lab Manager, Anthropology Graduate Organization, Binghamton University
- April 2012-present Founder and Coordinator of Flintknapping Group, sponsored by Anthropology Graduate Organization, Binghamton University
- April 2012-present Social Media Coordinator, Public Archaeology Interest Group, Society for American Archaeology

Teaching Experience at Binghamton University:

- Anthropology 111 (Intro to Anthropology)
- Anthropology 168 (Intro to Prehistoric Archaeology)
- Anthropology 167 (Intro to Biological Anthropology)
- Community Archaeology Program for Teens (through the Public Archaeology Facility)


 

Elizabeth Evangelou

  Elizabeth Evangelou

   MA/PhD student
   Biological Anthropologist
   eevange2@binghamton.edu
Year Admitted: 2013
Advisor: Elizabeth DiGangi

Research Interests

I am interested in osteology, bioarchaeology, and forensic anthropology. My research to this point has focused on the human pelvis. My master’s thesis was on “scars of parturition” and their possible relationship with obesity.


 

Jorge Fernando Flores  Jorge Fernando Flores

   PhD student
   Archaeologist
   jflores1@binghamton.edu
   Year admitted: 2014
   Advisor: Dr. William Isbell

Research Interests

Andean archaeology, political economy during late pre-historic period, materiality, materials and resource extraction, spatial and geographic analysis.

Experience

I have participated in 4 field schools and worked on a wide range of archaeological projects, including 6 academic investigations and 13 CRM projects. The roles that I performed in those archaeological projects have included: field technician, laboratory assistant, crew chief, and co-investigator. I also have worked as a research assistant with two archaeological collections in museums.


 

Maxwell Forton  Maxwell Forton

   MA/PhD student
   Archaeologist
   mforton1@binghamton.edu
   Year admitted: 2014
   Advisor: Ruth Van Dyke

Research interests

My research is focused on the archaeology of the Colorado Plateau, particularly that of the greater Chaco landscape and rock art studies. My most recent summer field season was spent surveying the new expansion lands of Petrified Forest National Park.

Conference Presentations

Pecos Conference 2015 "Petroglyphs of Mac Stod: Rock Art as an Indicator of Chacoan Influence in Petrified Forest National Park"
Society for American Archaeology 2015 "Ground Stone as a Migration Marker: Using Finger-Grooved Manos and Fully Grooved Axe-Heads to Trace Kayenta Influence at Salado Sites"

Michigan State University Undergraduate Research and Arts Forum 2014 "Dig the Past: A Hands on Introduction to Archaeology"
Chacmool Conference 2013 "Ceramics of Actun Kabul: Identifying Social Interaction Spheres in Central Belize River Valleys" with Becky Shelton


Brittany Fullen

PhD student
Archaeologist
bfullen1@binghamton.edu
Year admitted: 2010
Advisor: William H. Isbell

My interests lie primarily in Andean archaeology and the emergence and collapse of complex societies.  I am interested in the construction and implementation of power and how those in power create, use, and manipulate symbolism, iconography and landscape in order to achieve their goals.  Additionally, I am interested in how local societies are incorporated into the larger imperial spheres; how they relate to other subjects, colonists, and heartland elite; and how they accept, negotiate, or reject the state with its ideology and infrastructure of rule.   In order to study core/periphery relations, I am focusing my studies on ceramics as a highly portable and visible medium in which to communicate messages and influence decision-making among individuals and groups involved in the process of empire.


Kelly Gardner

PhD student
Cultural Anthropology
kgardne5@binghamton.edu
Year admitted: 2014
Advisor: Pamela Smart and Doug Holmes

MA 2007 Museum Studies, Syracuse University


Ariel Gruenthal

  Ariel Gruenthal-Rankin

   PhD student
   Biological Anthropologist
   agruent1@binghamton.edu
   Year Admitted: 2015
   Advisor: Elizabeth DiGangi

Research Interests

My research interest relates to infant and childhood skeletal growth and development in modern and archaeological contexts. I am particularly interested in the impact of early-life stress on disease outcomes, and the relationship of nutrition and physiological stress. I conduct fieldwork in Northeastern Poland at a 14th century medieval cemetery, where I also co-direct a field program. My previous research experience in taphonomy, albeit in a forensic context, continues to inform my work in bioarchaeology today.

Selected Publications & Presentations

M. Ramsier, Gruenthal-Rankin, A, A. Koperkiewicz and M. Polcyn. 2016.Preliminary osteological analysis and stature estimates of adults in an early Medieval Prussian population at Bezławki, Poland. 65th Annual Meeting, American Association of Physical Anthropology.

Gruenthal-Rankin, A, M. Ramsier, A. Koperkiewicz and M. Polcyn. 2015. Preliminary osteological analyses of the early Medieval Prussian population at Bezlawki, Poland. 64th Annual Meeting, American Association of Physical Anthropology.

Gruenthal, A, A. Martinetti, K. Worsham, E. Bartelink, P. Willey and M Glenn. 2013. An Archaeological Case of Mid-Facial Pathology in Northwestern California.  Western Bioarchaeology Group Conference, Berkeley, CA.

Gruenthal, A, T Simmons and C Moffat. 2012. Differential Decomposition Patterns in Charred Versus Un-Charred Remains. Journal of Forensic Sciences 57(1): 12-18.

Gruenthal AM. 2010. Differential Decomposition Patterns in Charred Versus Un-Charred Remains. Proceedings of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Vol 16.


 

Erina Gruner

  Erina Gruner

  PhD student
  Archaeologist
  epgruner@gmail.edu
  Year admitted: (MA, 2009) PhD, 2012
  Advisor: Ruth Van Dyke

Publications
2012  Post-Chacoan Ceremonial Societies on the Chaco Periphery.  Masters Thesis submitted to the Department of Anthropology at Binghamton University.
2013  Re-envisioning Nativism: The Use of Ecclesiastical Paraphernalia During the Pueblo Revolt.  Kiva 78(3): 313-335
In Review  Replicating Things, Replicating Identity: The Movement of Chacoan Ritual Paraphernalia Beyond the Chaco World.  In Practicing Materiality, edited by Ruth Van Dyke.  University of Arizona Press.

Reports
2012  A Class III Cultural Inventory of the Roan Ranch to Chevron Transfer Station in Section 3 Pipeline Feasibility Project for Encana Gas & Oil (USA), Inc. in Garfield County, Colorado; Permit #: CRIR 16912-02, CO 130-8151-12-21

Posters and Papers
2013  Ceremonial Exchange and Prestige Trade in the 12th Century A.D.  Paper presented at the Pecos Conference, Flagstaff, AZ.
2013  There's No Place Like Dunes: Long Term Occupation of Upland Dunes in Petrified Forest National Park.  Preliminary Findings of the 2013 Expansion Land Survey.  Poster presented at the 2013 Pecos Conference, Flagstaff AZ.  Prepared by Gregory Luna Golya, Erina Gruner, Crystal Simms, Emmy Kvamme.
2013  Who's Your Farmer?  Local Food Production and Regional Ceramic Trade in Petrified Forest National Park.  Poster presented at the 2013 Pecos Conference, Flagstaff AZ.  Prepared by Reuven Sinensky, Iva Lee Lehmkhul, Erina Gruner, Kathleen McConnell, Stephanie Mack, and Samantha Jo Linford.

Awards
2012 winner of the Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society and Arizona Archaeological Council Julian D. Hayen Student Paper Competition.


Amanda Guitar  Amanda Guitar

   MA/PhD student
   Biological Anthropologist
   aguitar1@binghamton.edu
   Year Admitted: 2013
   Advisor: Rolf Quam

Links
Website: http://amandaguitar.com/
CV: http://amandaguitar.com/cv/
Publications: http://amandaguitar.com/publications/
Presentations: http://amandaguitar.com/videos/
Previous Research: http://amandaguitar.com/research/

Research Interests
I am interested in feminist evolutionary perspectives and exploring novel conceptual frameworks in evolutionary research. My current research is focused on the ovulatory cycle, human olfaction, and the debate surrounding the existence of human pheromones. Previous research topics include female intrasexual competition on Facebook, conceptualizations of emotional and sexual infidelity, an evolutionary analysis of body ornamentation, and testing an evolutionary model of emotional states using Second Life.

Grants and Awards
2013 - Graduate Student of Excellence in Psychology, SUNY New Paltz
2013 - EvoS Program Thesis Research Grant ($400), SUNY New Paltz
2012 - Best Student Oral Presentation, NorthEastern Evolutionary Psychology Society
2012 - Best Student Poster, Feminist Evolutionary Psychology Society
2012 - Research & Creative Projects Grant ($400), SUNY New Paltz

Publications

  • Peterson, A. & Guitar, A. E. (in press). Empowering Women: The Next Step in Human Evolution? [Book Review]. Evolutionary Psychology.
  • Geher, G., Carmen, R. A., Guitar, A. E., Gangemi, B., & Shimkus, A. (in press). The evolutionary psychology of small-scale versus large-scale politics: Ancestral conditions did not include large-scale politics. European Journal of Social Psychology.
  • Guitar, A. E., & Carmen, R. A. (2015). Facebook frenemies and selfie-promotion: How do women compete in the Digital Age? In M. Fisher (Ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Women and Competition. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Kruger, D., Fisher, M., Fitzgerald, C. J., Garcia, J. R., Geher, G., & Guitar, A. E. (2015). Sexual and emotional aspects are distinct components of infidelity and unique predictors of anticipated distress. Evolutionary Psychological Sciences, 1, 1-8.
  • Johnsen, L., Guitar, A. E., & Geher, G. (2015). Divorce patterns and the male-to-female mortality ratio: Is midlife crisis the death of men? EvoS Journal, 6(2), 33-41.
  • Glass, D. J., Guitar, A. E., & Carmen, R. A. (2014). Evolutionary Studies from the student perspective, EvoS Journal, 6(1), 12-17.
  • Sokol-Chang, R., Fisher, M.L., Brandon, M., Burch, B., Carmen, R.A., Glass, D. J., Guitar, A.E., Geher, G., Hinshaw, J., Newmark, R.L., Nicolas, S.C., Peterson, A.N., Radtke, S., Tauber, B. R., & Wade, T.J. (2013). Letter of purpose of the Feminist Evolutionary Psychology Society. Journal of Social, Evolution, and Cultural Studies, 7(4), 286-294.
  • Carmen, R. A., Geher, G., Glass, D. J., Guitar, A. E., Grandis, T. L., Johnsen, L.,Philip, M. M., Newmark, R. L., Trouton, G. T., & Tauber, B. R. (2013). Evolution integrated across all islands of the human behavioral archipelago. EvoS Journal, 5(1), 108-126.
  • Carmen, R. A., Guitar, A. E., & Dillon, H. M. (2012). From accidental ape to walking on the moon: A new theory of human uniqueness [Book Review]. Journal of Social, Evolution, and Cultural Studies, 6(1), 132-136.
  • Trouton, G., Guitar, A. E., Carmen, R. A., Grandis, T. & Geher, G. (2012). Male sexual orientation and the ability to detect female ovulation via olfaction. Journal of Social, Evolution, and Cultural Studies, 6(4), 469-479.
  • Carmen, R. A., Guitar, A. E., & Dillon, H. M. (2012). Ultimate answers to proximate questions: The evolutionary motivations behind tattoos and body piercings in popular culture. Review of General Psychology, 16(2), 134-143.

Frances Harrison  Frances W. Harrison

   PhD student
   Sociocultural Anthropologist
   fharris2@binghamton.edu 
   https://sites.google.com/site/franthro/
   Year admitted: 2012
   Advisor: Thomas M. Wilson

Research Interests

Frances Harrison's research focuses on postsocialist and post-Soviet societies of Eastern Europe. She studies the interrelationships of nationalism, conservative politics, xenophobia, and energy security in Lithuania and the Baltics specifically, and incorporates a critical approach to practices of Europeanization, neoliberalism, and democratization in the region. Her most recent research uses civil society as the basis for understanding the politics of Lithuanian foreign policy changes in response to the Ukraine Crisis.

Publications

Harrison, Frances W. (2012) “Reviving Heritage in Post-Soviet Eastern Europe: a Visual Approach to National Identity,” Totem: the University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology: Vol 20: Iss. 1, Article 3. http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/totem/

Conference Presentations

Association for the Advancement of Baltic Studies
2016 – May 26-28th University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, NY

Northeast Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies Conference
2014 – March 29th. West Chester University of Pennsylvania, PA. Nuclear Energy and Policy in a Europeanizing Lithuania

National Conference of Undergraduate Research (NCUR)
2011 – Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY. Honors Thesis: Reviving Heritage in Post-Soviet Eastern Europe: A Visual Approach to National Identity.

Undergraduate Anthropology Research Symposium
2011 – Bridgewater State University, Bridgewater, MA. Honors Thesis: Reviving Heritage in Post-Soviet Eastern Europe: A Visual Approach to National Identity.

Adrian Tinsley Undergraduate Research Symposium
2010 – Bridgewater State University, Bridgewater, MA. GIS Project: Ethnic Clustering in Brockton and Lowell, MA.

Awards

2015 – Spring Semester: Lithuanian State Scholarship (ŠMPF): Short Term Baltic Studies, Vilnius University ($2,400)

2015 - Fall Semester: Lithuanian State Scholarship (ŠMPF): Short Term Baltic Studies, Vilnius University ($2,400)

2013 - Lithuanian State Scholarship, Education Exchanges Support Foundation (ŠMPF): Lithuanian Language Summer Course, Vilnius University ($600)

2011 – Dr. George B. Horner Award: Academic Excellence in Anthropology, Bridgewater State University

2011 – Dr. Madhu N. Rao Scholarship: Excellence in Geography ($700), Bridgewater State UniversityAssociation for the Advancement of Baltic Studies


Gabrielle Hanley-Mott

MA/PhD student
Sociocultural Anthropologist
ghanley1@binghamton.edu
Year Admitted: 2013
Advisor: Doug Glick

 


Paula Hertfelder  Paula Hertfelder

   PhD student
   Archaeologist
   phertfe1@binghamton.edu 
   Year admitted: 2014
   Advisor: Dr. Randall McGuire

I am an MA/PhD student interested in GIS analysis and public archaeology. While my PhD work is focused on the site of Cerro de Trincheras in Sonora, I have worked throughout North America and the Caribbean. Prior to attending Binghamton University I received a Fulbright Fellowship to research GIS and prehistoric site conservation in Trinidad and Tobago. I've also worked several seasons as an archaeological technician for the U.S. Forest Service. This summer, I began work as a Pathways Intern at the Six Rivers National Forest, CA.


Amelia L. Hessey Amelia L. Hessey

   PhD student
   Biological (Forensic) Anthropologist
   ahessey1@binghamton.edu
   Year Admitted: 2014
   Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth DiGangi

I completed my undergraduate degree at the University of Montana and my M.A. at Texas State University. My research interests are in forensic anthropology and its application to human rights and humanitarian concerns, focusing on developing methods of identification around the world.


Christopher Hopkins

MA/PhD student
Archaeologist
chopkin2@binghamton.edu
Year Admitted: 2013
Advisor: Siobhan Hart


 

James Hundley  James Hundley

   PhD student
   Sociocultural Anthropologist
   jhundley@binghamton.edu
   Year admitted: 2010
   Advisor: Thomas M. Wilson

Research Interests

James Hundley's research examines the Canada/US border, post-9/11 border securitization, and how transnational governance is emerging as a way of mitigating problems experienced by the Coast Salish indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. He also examines how the Pacific Northwest Economic Region, a bi-national public/private partnership, is similarly exploring transnational opportunities in the region. The varied strategies employed demonstrate the changing nature of sovereignty and ethnicity as diverse groups respond to the state and security policy in different ways. He is currently in the field (2014-2015).

Selected Conference presentations

2013  Graduate Engaged Research Conference, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
Participatory Action Research and the Whatcom Transportation Authority: A Case Study of a Failed Project

2012  American Anthropological Association Meetings, San Francisco, California, USA
The "Anticipated" versus the "Actual" Impacts of the Western Hemisphere, Travel Initiative on Coast Salish Communities

2012  Security's Impact on Border Policies, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Security, Sovereignty and North American Regionalism: Lessons from the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative

2008  Northwest Anthropological Conference, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Anticipated Impacts of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative on Coast Salish Communities

Grants and awards

Whatcom Museum Foundation Research Grant
Canadian Studies Doctoral Student Research Award Program
Border Policy Research Institute Thesis Fellowship


 

Carmita Icasiano  Carmita Eliza De Jesus Icasiano

   PhD Student
   Sociocultural Anthropology
   cicasia1@binghamton.edu
   Year Admitted: 2012
   Advisor: Pamela G. Smart


Research interests

Having had a relationship with cultural objects that started in the museum of the museum of the Cultural Center of the Philippines, where I worked for eight years, I am now studying the history of Philippine cultural objects in the holdings of museums in the United States, how people engage with Philippine cultural objects (likhang-bayan)--whether in museum, artisanal and arttistic, and domestic settings, and how modalities of care emerge from each. This interest bears upon an advocacy towards a sustained production of likhang-bayan, and a recognition of traditional artisans.

Awards

2014 Summer Institute in Museum Anthropology, Smithsonian
2012-2014 Fulbright Foreign Student Program
2010 Asian Cultural Council, Individual Research Fellowship


Jayme Job  Jayme L. Job

   PhD student
   Archaeologist
   jjob1@binghamton.edu
   Advisor: Susan Pollock

 

My dissertation site is in Greece (Neolithic Halai). The site is in east-central Greece and I'm working on the ceramics and groundstone; my dissertation itself is on Neolithic Greek Foodways. I've worked at the site the past three years and will be returning this summer (2012).


Laura L. Johnson  Laura L. Johnsen

   PhD student
   Sociocultural Anthropology
   ljohnse1@binghamton.edu
                       Admitted: Fall 2012
                       Advisor: Joshua Reno

I completed my MA in  Anthropology in the Spring of 2014 here at Binghamton University and I am currently pursuing my PhD under the advisement of Dr. Joshua Reno.  My research interests include intimacy, artificial intelligence, robotics, virtual reality, and human sexuality.  Additionally, I am a member of  the  Feminist Evolutionary Perspectives Society (FEPS) and was the student representative for the NorthEastern Evolutionary Psychology Society (NEEPS) from 2013-2016.

Recent Publications & Presentations

Johnsen, L. (2016). When plug meets socket: Making love in digital landscapes. Presented at the University of Rhode Island Graduate Student Conference: Trans(form): New Insights and New Directions

Johnsen, L. L., Guitar, A. E., Geher, G. (2015). Divorce patterns and the male-to-female mortality ratio: Is midlife the death of men? EvoS Journal: The journal of the evolutionary studies consortium, 6(2): 33-41

Johnsen, L. & Geher, G. (In Press). Fashion as a Medium of Intrasexual Competition. In the Oxford Handbook of Women and Competition. M. L. Fisher (Ed.). NY: Oxford University Press.


Yakup Deniz Kahraman

MA/PhD student
Sociocultural Anthropologist
ykahram1@binghamton.edu
Year Admitted: 2013
Advisor: Doug Holmes


Katherine Lacy  Katherine Lacy

   PhD student
   Paleoanthropologist
   klacy1@binghamton.edu
   Year Admitted: 2014
   Advisor: Rolf Quam


Hayley Mann  Hayley Mann

   PhD student
   Biological Anthropologist
   hmann3@binghamton.edu
   Year Admitted: 2012
   Advisor: Koji Lum

Research interests

I am a doctoral student with a background in human genetics and evolutionary anthropology.  My research pertains to molecular adaptation and how certain environmental agents have influenced allele frequencies across different human populations.

Conference Presentations

Mann HA, Kemp BM, Sullivan RJ, Hagen EH. 2012. The Highly Polymorphic Human Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2A6 Gene: Examining Diversity and Nicotine Metabolism in a Central African Foraging Population. Poster presented at the 81st annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists. Portland, OR.


 

Jackson Malle  Jackson Malle

   PhD student
   Sociocultural Anthropologist
   jmalle1@binghamton.edu
                   Year admittted: 2009
                   Advisor: Dr. Douglas R. Holmes

Jackson is an anthropologist, chef, screenwriter, and documentary film producer. His research interests include ethnography, cinema, film production, auteur theory, tastemaking, and collaboration. Jackson’s fieldwork goes between immersion in a specific “site” within which a movie is made, composed of hundreds of “locations” or mini-sites and the day-to-day operations that take place there, and a more macro-level analysis of the film business writ large. Implicated in the ethnographic story, he examines how a critical introspection plays out among film people, and how their comments resonate with, and at times disavow, what critics and scholars surmise about the industry. Through two years of participant observation and in-depth interviews with various figures inside both Hollywood and indie film worlds, Jackson's dissertation aims to reveal the complex production communities and highly developed expertise that operate in the profoundly collaborative milieu of film production, which have a tendency to be obfuscated by auteur discourse.

Celia Murnock  Celia Murnock

   MS student
   Biomedical Anthropologist
   cmurnock@gmail.com
   Year admitted: 2012
   Advisor: Ralph Garruto

Research Interests

My research interest is in chronic disease, specifically fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome and the relationship between these illnesses and mood and anxiety disorders.  Currently I am part of the Tick-Borne Disease Research Project with Dr. Ralph Garruto.


 

Olivia Plante  Olivia Plante

   PhD student
   Biological Anthropologist
   oplante1@binghamton.edu  
   Year admitted: 2013
   Advisor: Douglas Holmes

Research Interests

My research interests include comparative health systems analysis and the formulative dynamics between corporate, government, and public actors in the emergence of new biotechnologies for translational medicine. In particular, I am investigating the recent return to bacteriophage therapies, amidst concerns over antibiotic resistant diseases, biological engineering, regulatory enigmas, and the historical significance of phages in the saga of East vs. West therapeutic approaches.


 

Alysa Pomer  Alysa Pomer

   PhD candidate
   Biomedicall Anthropologist
   alysa.pomer@binghamton.edu  
   Year admitted: 2009 (MS), 2011 (MA/PhD)
   Advisor: J. Koji Lum

Human Biology Association (HBA) Student Representative 2015-2017

Research Interests

Health transition, women’s health, evolutionary health, life history, stress, Pacific populations

Publications

KM Olszowy, A Pomer, KN Dancause, C Sun, H Silverman, G Lee, CW Chan, L Tarivonda, R Reganvanu, A Kaneko, CA Weitz, JK Lum, RM Garruto. 2015. Impact of modernization on adult body composition on five islands of varying economic development in Vanuatu. Am J Hum Biol, 27: 832-844.

Selected Conference Presentations

A Pomer, KM Olszowy, C Sun, KN Dancause, CW Chan, H Silverman, G Lee, L Tarivonda, G Taleo, M Abong, R Reganvanu, A Kaneko, CA Weitz, RM Garruto, JK Lum. 2015. Height and reproductive success in Ni-Vanuatu women. 40th Annual Meeting of the Human Biology Association, St. Louis, Missouri, March 25-26. (Poster presentation.)

A Pomer, CW Chan, KN Dancause, G Lee, KM Olszowy, H Silverman, C Sun, CA Weitz, SA Waldman, MM Fernandez, L Tarivonda, G Taleo, M Abong, R Reganvanu, A Kaneko, RM Garruto, JK Lum. 2013. Young women’s education as a social determinant of fertility in Vanuatu? 38th Annual Meeting of the Human Biology  Association, Knoxville, Tennessee, April 10-11. (Poster presentation.)

A Pomer, CW Chan, KN Dancause, G Lee, KM Olszowy, H Silverman, C Sun, C Weitz, RM Garruto, JK Lum. 2012. Change in age at menarche in Vanuatu. 37th Annual Meeting of the Human Biology Association, Portland, Oregon, April 11-12. (Podium presentation.)

Fieldwork

Summer 2011: Vanuatu, South Pacific.
Summer 2015: Vanuatu, South Pacific.

Current Projects

“Healthy Women, Healthy Communities”. PI: Kelsey Dancause (UQAM).
Vanuatu Health Transitions Project. PI: Ralph Garruto, J. Koji Lum.



Erin Riggs

MA/PhD student
Archaeologist
eriggs1@binghamton.edu
Year Admitted: 2013
Advisor: Randy McGuire


Paul Rufledt

MA/PhD student
Archaeologist
prufled1@binghamton.edu
Year Admitted: 2013
Advisor: Siobhan Hart


Amanda Roome  Amanda Roome

   MA/PhD student
   Biological Anthropologist
   aroome1@binghamton.edu  
   Year admitted: 2012
   Advisor: Ralph Garruto

Research interests
Population dynamics, behavioral risks, pathogenesis and transmission of new and re-
emerging infectious diseases in modern day societies; zoonotic diseases; vector borne
diseases; epidemiology; public health.

Publications

A Roome, A Ferrier, YJ Cen, K Schaal, F Tiu, S Vogel, S Nelson, D Goldberg, K Patel,
M Armstrong, H Lin, M Susco, B Kopping, C Hashem, Z Tayyem, J Randall, S John, Z
Shah, R Spathis, RM Garruto. 2016. Risk of Lyme disease in the Upper Susquehanna
River Basin. Forty-first annual meeting of the Human Biology Association, Atlanta,
Georgia, April 13-14. American Journal of Human Biology. 28(2): 294.

KM Olszowy, A Roome, K Bower, L Tarivonda, D Ngwele. 2016. Is maximal handgrip
strength associated with biomarkers of cardiometabolic disease risk in Melanesian
adults in Vanuatu? Forty-first annual meeting of the Human Biology Association,
Atlanta, Georgia, April 13-14. American Journal of Human Biology. 28(2): 289.

A Roome, M McAuliffe, L Hill, V Al-Feghali, N Monroe, G Buffa, K Bower, I Li, S Tyurin,
C Pabafikos, A Leighton, U Syed, C Koulouris, D Rios, A Maliga, S Alam, P Patel, N
Cicchetti, A Nichter, K Lupo, C Malone, R Spathis, RM Garruto. 2015. Seasonality and
risk of infection of Lyme disease. Fortieth annual meeting of the Human Biology
Association, St. Louis, Missouri, March 25-26. American Journal of Human Biology.
27(2): 284.

M McAuliffe, A Roome, I Li, V Al-Feghali, C Malone, A Hammond, P Barone, J
Christophel, J Bermeo, G Blumberg, K Bower, G Buffa, L Chiu, N Kaur, C Koulouris, A
Leighton, K Lupo, A Maliga, N Monroe, C Pabafikos, D Rios, U Syed, S Tyurin, S Alam,
N Chicchetti, K Jones, A Nichter, P Patel, L Hill, A Ong, R Spathis, RM Garruto. 2015.
Human behaviors increase rodent reservoir host and vector tick spread and risk of
contact with the Lyme disease pathogen, Borrelia burgdorferi. Fortieth annual meeting
of the Human Biology Association, St. Louis, Missouri, March 25-26. American Journal
of Human Biology. 27(2): 276.
 
A Roome, K Bower, CG Murnock, L Hill, B Ho, S Tyurin, V Al-Feghali, H Zeitz , D Rios,
R Parwez, I Li, A Leighton, K Lupo, Y Hao, C Pabafikos, J Goodsell, N Scher, S Daivs,
T Lamendola, R Singh, J Ma, N DeLeon, JM Darcy II, R Spathis, RM Garruto. 2014.
Prevalence of tick-borne pathogens and human behavioral risk factors in built
environments of upstate New York suggest a necessity for the development of risk
management models. Thirty-ninth annual meeting of the Human Biology Association,
Calgary, Canada, April 9-10. American Journal of Human Biology. 26(2): 279.
 
K Bower, A Roome, KM Olszowy, D Ngwele, L Tarivonda, JK Lum, KN Dancause, RM
Garruto. 2014. Evaluating obesity using waist to height ratio as a predictor of
cardiometabolic disease risk in adult Melanesians in Vanuatu. Thirty-ninth annual
meeting of the Human Biology Association, Calgary, Canada, April 9-10. American
Journal of Human Biology. 26(2): 260-261.
 
KM Olszowy, A Roome, K Bower, D Ngwele, L Tarivonda, JK Lum, KN Dancause, RM
Garruto. 2014. Understanding the impact of maternal obesity on childhood nutritional
status in an urban Ni-Vanuatu community. Thirty-ninth annual meeting of the Human
Biology Association, Calgary, Canada, April 9-10. American Journal of Human Biology.
26(2): 276.


 

Michelle Bongermino-Rose   Michelle Bongermino-Rose

   PhD student
   Biological Anthropologist
   mbonger1@binghamton.edu
Year admitted: 2012
Advisor: Dr. Gary James


Research Interests

Having graduated from the Biomedical Anthropology M.S. program, my interests and training revolve around the biocultural approach to public health and human variation. I am currently focusing on human adaptive strategies in relation to stress and wellness, particularly in cooperative gaming.

Publications

Evaluating a Non-verbal Assessment Tool in Nursing Students and Staff at the University of Botswana. Anthropology. Anthropology. (Accepted April 2016)

Presentations

2015    Six-year follow-up of a point-source exposure to CWD contaminated venison, in an upstate New York community: Risk behaviors and health outcomes 2005-2011.

(Human Biological Association, poster presentation).

2014    Six-year follow-up of a point-source exposure to CWD contaminated venison, in an upstate New York community: Risk behaviors and health outcomes 2005-2011.

(Binghamton Biomedical Research Conference, poster presentation).


Hande Sarikuzu  Hande Sarikuzu

   PhD student
   Sociocultural Anthropologist
   hsariku1@binghamton.edu
   Year admitted: 2011
   Advisor: Thomas Wilson

Research Interests

Hande’s research examines power at the intersection of the anthropology of money and law: She is studying the emergent contexts of reconciliatory justice in Turkey, particularly in the period between 2004 and 2015, in order to understand the relationship between material value, moral debt, and legal repair in the aftermath of violence. She has carried out ethnographic fieldwork between 2014 and 2016 in Dersim, a Kurdish-Kizilbas Alevi region in Eastern Turkey, where contentious political identities have been shaped by historical layers of war and state violence.

Grants and Fellowships

2017 Spring - Richard T. Antoun Dissertation Year Fellowship
2016 Spring - The Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities Fellowship
2015 - Wenner-Gren Foundation Dissertation Fieldwork Grant

Selected Conference Presentations

2015 “Political Epistemics of Regional Identity in Tunceli/Dersim, Turkey,” AAA Annual Meeting, Denver, CO

2015 “Designing the Past: Memory-Making and Architecture in the Roboski Museum,” (co-author) Spectres of Justice: The Aesthetics of Dealing with Violent Pasts, Marburg, Germany

2015 “‘Facing Power’ in Legal Ethnography: Studying Neoliberal Reconciliation in Turkey,” BSA Annual Conference, Glasgow, UK

2013 “Continuation of Conflict by Other Means: Post-Conflict Transitions to Peace,” (panel co-organizer) AAA Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL


 

Katherine E. Seeber   Katherine E. Seeber

   MA/PhD student
   Archaeologist
   kseeber2@binghamton.edu
Year admitted: 2014
Advisor: Siobhan Hart


Research Interests
Katie Seeber is a MA/PhD student whose research interests focus around heritage archaeology, public archaeology, and utilization of archaeological data to engage contemporary communities with the past. Her work with Dr. Siobhan Hart and Dr. Nina Versaggi focuses on 18th century Haudenosaunne communities in the southern tier of New York state. She is currently researching the socio-political and geographical ramifications of conglomerate, multi-national, multi-lingual indigenous settlements. She is working for MAPA (Master's of Arts Degree in Public Archaeology at Binghamton University) to develop their new program and help create a new space where public archaeology and academic archaeology can intersect and develop new paths for future archaeologists.

Presentations

Seeber, K 2013. Negotiating the Transformation of a Work Space into a Classroom and a Museum at James Madison's Montpelier. Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England

Seeber, K 2012. A Blending of Techniques; A Look at Past, Present, and Future Methodologies at James Madison's Montpelier. Society for Historical Archaeology, Baltimore, Maryland.

Seeber, K 2011. Digging in the Archives: Using Archival Data to Uncover Lost Settlers. State University of New York at Potsdam, 2011 North Eastern Anthropological Association Conference, Rindge, New Hampshire.


 

Jessica Smeeks   Jessica Smeeks

    PhD student

    Archaeologist
    jsmeeks1@binghamton.edu
                         Year admitted: 2011
                         Advisor:  William H. Isbell

 

Research Interests

My research interests are centered in the Andean Mountains of Peru, particularly the Ayacucho Department.  For my dissertation, I am examining the intersection of warfare and sociopolitical organization.  More specifically, I am conducting an interregional comparative study, which considers how the relationship between sociopolitical organization and warfare practices changed (if at all) during the shift from the Middle Horizon (ca. AD 600-1000) to the Late Intermediate Period (LIP) (ca. AD 1000-1450), with the LIP, and during the shift from the LIP to the Late Horizon (ca. AD 1450-1534).  My survey work focuses on the most reliable indicators of conflict and defense, defensive works (or fortifications), weapons, and settlement patterns.

My secondary research interests include community archaeology, heritage, resource management, museum studies, and cultural property.  I am fully committed to a community-based archaeology, one that not only finds and protects archaeological resources but also cultivates an understanding and appreciation for archaeology in the community.  As such, I have created and taught hands-on archaeology programs to elementary and middle school aged students in New York and North Carolina and participated in several community outreach programs.  I am also working on an article concerning authorized heritage discourse (AHD) in Peru.  The article considers why heritage management practices seem to be focused on some cultural property more than other cultural property and how this affects not only perceptions of the Peruvian past but also community and individual health in Peru.

Conference presentations

2014   Authorized Heritage Discourse and the Triangle of Health in Peru.  Paper presented at the International Heritage and Society Conference.  University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Amherst, MA.

2014   The Technical Processes that Drive Authorized Heritage Discourse in Peru.  Paper presented at the 4th Biennial Graduate Student Conference on World Historical Social Science.  Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY

2010   Battling with Ironclads:  An Analysis of the Technological Developments in Ships of the 18th and 19th Century in Association with the War of the Pacific, 1879-1884.  Paper presented at the Regional Phi Alpha Theta Conference, Coastal Carolina, Conway, SC.


Arianna Stimpfl

MA/PhD student
Archaeologist
astimpf1@binghamton.edu
Year admitted: 2013
Advisor: Kathleen Sterling/Susan Pollock


Cheng Sun  Cheng Sun

   PhD student
   Biological and Biomedical Anthropologist
   csun@binghamton.edu
   Year admitted: 2009
   Advisor: J. Koji Lum


Research Interests

I am a PhD candidate in anthropology specializing in biological and social risk factors for disease. My dissertation research focuses on 1) obesogenic effects of technology adoption in modernizing Vanuatu and 2) biological and psychological basis for Internet overuse among college students in the US. Topics of my other projects include molecular evolution of antimalarial resistance, effects of "Soylent" diet on human GI track microbiome, and genetic and cultural diversity in Palau.

Brandon Sutton

MA/PhD student
Archaeologist
bsutton3@binghamton.edu
Year admitted: 2013
Advisor: Josh Reno


Kellam Throgmorton   Kellam Throgmorton

   PhD student
   Archaeologist
   kthrogm1@binghamton.edu
   Year Admitted: 2014
   Advisor: Ruth Van Dyke

Research Interests

My research is centered in the landscapes of the “Four Corners” region of the U.S. Southwest. For my MA work, I developed analytical methods to investigate household architecture, migration, and cultural identity, using the Puerco Valley of Arizona/New Mexico between A.D. 600-900 as a case study. More recently, I have been considering the role of demographic change in transformations of political organization in the Mesa Verde region between A.D. 650-800, when the first aggregated villages formed. This research draws on rock art, settlement patterns, architecture, and demographic simulations. I also have an interest in the relationship between public policy and historic and contemporary landscapes of development in the western U.S. from 1880 to the present.

Publications

in review         Kellam Throgmorton. Vernacular Architecture in the Chacoan World. In Vernacular Architecture of the Pre-Columbian Americas, edited by Christina Halperin and Lauren Schwartz. Routledge Press.

In review         Kellam Throgmorton. Architectural Traditions in the Early Pueblo Period Puerco Valley. In Social Identity in Frontier and Borderland Communities in the North American Southwest, edited by Karen Harry and Sarah Herr. University of Colorado Press, Boulder.

2012    Pit House Architecture in the Puerco Valley, AD 600-900: Form, Function, and Cultural Identity. Unpublished MA Thesis, University of Colorado, Boulder.

2012    Gregson Schachner, Kellam Throgmorton, Richard Wilshusen, and James R. Allison. Early Pueblos in the American Southwest: the Loss of Innocence and the Origins of the Early Southwestern Village. In Crucible of Pueblos: The Early Pueblo Period in the Northern Southwest, edited by Richard H. Wilshusen, Gregson Schachner, and James R. Allison. Cotsen Institute of Archaeology Press, University of California, Los Angeles

Selected Conference Presentations

2015 Households, Kin Groups, and Villages: Exploring the Foundations of Chacoan Inequality, by Kellam Throgmorton. Boston University Archaeology 15th Biennial Graduate Student Conference, Boston, MA.

2015 Great House—Small House / Long House—Short House: Seeking the Underpinnings of Chacoan Sociopolitical Organization. Pecos Conference, Mancos, Colorado.

2015 Kellam Throgmorton and Richard H. Wilshusen. Organizational Heterogeneity in Early Pueblo Houses. Presented in “The Neolithic House: Worldwide Comparisons” (Dr. Thomas Rocek, chair). 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology in San Francisco, CA.

2014 Basketmaker III and Pueblo I on the McElmo Dome: New Perspectives. Pecos Conference, Blanding, Utah.

2014 Kellam Throgmortonand Ruth Van Dyke. Vernacular Architecture in the Chacoan World, by. 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology in Austin, Texas.

2013 As Frontier, as Borderland: Explaining Pit Structure Variability in the Puerco Valley, AZ and NM A.D. 600 – 900. 78th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology in Honolulu, Hawaii.

2013 Village Roots of Chacoan Great Houses. Big Meeting at Crow Canyon (BigMACC), February 25th 2013.

2012 Architectural Diversity in the Puerco Valley, Arizona, AD 600 – 900. 77th Annual Meeting of the Society of American Archaeology in Memphis, Tennessee.

Grants and Awards

2015    Linda Cordell Student Paper Prize—honorable mention

2014    Linda Cordell Student Paper Prize—3rd place

2010    Alice Hamilton Scholarship Award

Field Work and Current Projects

I am currently an affiliated researcher on an NSF-funded project (#1419675) that explores regional identity, social diversity, and demographic change in the Mariana Mesa and Cebolleta Mesa regions of west-central New Mexico. My role in the project is to investigate lithic materials circulation and technological variability in flaked stone tool production between settlements in the project area; this includes a sourcing study and research on previous collections.


Michele Troutman   Michele Troutman

   MA/PhD student
   Archaeologist
   mtroutm1@binghamton.edu
   Year Admitted: 2013
   Advisor: Sebastien Lacombe

Research Interests

Generally, I am interested in lithic technology, raw material sourcing, GIS, CRM, and prehistoric archaeology. In particular, I have a background in Northeast US archaeology, but I am currently studying the Upper Paleolithic in France. For my Master's topic, I am working on a spatial distribution of lithic artifacts at Peyre Blanque, an Upper Paleolithic site.

Selected Conference Presentations

2014  "Is Archaeology Predictable? : Pennsylvania's Predictive Model" Presentation with Marissa Seidel
- Forum (Preservation) Conference/ Annual Byways to the Past Conference

2012-13  "Lithic Analysis: The Raw Materials Present in the Lithic Artifacts of the Johnston Site (36In2)"
- Society for American Archaeology Annual Meeting, Memphis, TN
- McNair Annual Conference, Milwaukee, WI
- Undergraduate Scholars Conference (Best Poster for the College of Humanities and Social Sciences), IUP

Field Work and Related Experiences

2015  Graduate Assistant, Public Archaeology Facility (BU)

2015  Volunteer at the site of Peyre Blanque, Ariege, France

2014  Teaching Assistant, Anthropology 114 (BU)

2014  ESTI Intern at PennDOT, Harrisburg, PA

2014  Forum (Preservation) Conference/ Annual Byways to the Past Conference staff member, Philadelphia, PA

2012  Student Intern at the Indiana Historical Society, Indiana, PA

2012  Volunteer Archaeological Field Worker at the Johnston Site, Blairsville, PA

2012  Volunteer at Archaeological Services, IUP, Indiana, PA

2010  Archaeology Field School (IUP), Johnston Site, Blairsville, PA

2009-10  Student Worker at Archaeological Services, IUP, Indiana, PA


 

Michelle I. Turner  Michelle I. Turner

   PhD student
   Archaeologist
   mturner4@binghamton.edu
   Year Admitted: 2012
   Advisor: Ruth Van Dyke

Research Interests

My work is in southwestern archaeology, and specifically focuses on Chaco Canyon and its relationship to outlier communities. Most of my research has focused on Aztec Ruins National Monument. My MA thesis was a ceramic analysis of surface pottery sherds from the Aztec North great house at Aztec Ruins National Monument. My PhD dissertation project follows up on this work with further research on Aztec North and its place within the cultural landscape of Aztec Ruins and the Chacoan world. Having come to archaeology after practicing law for several years, I have an additional research interest in legal and ethical issues relating to cultural heritage and the repatriation of material culture and art.

Publications and Conference Presentations

Updates on my publications, presentations and other work are at

http://www.michelle-turner.net


Alex D. Valez   Alex D Velez

   MA/PhD student
   Paleoanthropologist
   AVelez5@binghamton.edu
Year admitted: 2014
Advisor: Rolf Quam


Research

Formerly specializing in pedal evolutionary morphology and the evolution of bipedalism, I now have interests in hominin evolutionary cranial morphology, ecomorphology, virtual anthropology, paleoecology, and sensory reconstruction. Essentially, I am interested in the dialogue between environment and ecology and hominin biological adaptation and evolution. I am also interested in techniques of virtual reconstruction of hominin fossils such as 3D geometric morphometrics and MicroCt scanning and their use in paleoanthropological research, especially in comparative studies featuring extant primate taxa.


Conference presentations

  • 2013 LSAMP Conference "Variation in Postcranial Morphology of Fossil Hominins."
  • 2014 CUNY Graduate Pipeline Conference "Primate Ecomorphology"
  • 2015 Koobi For a NSF-IRES Conferences "Down by the River: A Paleoecological Study of Water Dependence in Koobi Fora."

Angela K. Vandenbroek   Angela Kristin VandenBroek

   PhD student
   Sociocultural Anthropologist, Web Design & Development
   avanden3@binghamton.edu

Year admitted: 2013
Advisor: Doug Holmes 

Research Interests

I am interested in how collaborative teams use web design and other web-based work as a space for sociotechnical experimentation and creativity. As web technologies have become more entwined with the everyday activities of their users, web design has by necessity become increasingly ethnographic and socially engaged where web designers do not simply create aesthetically pleasing interfaces and functional code but also manage and incorporate knowledges about human behavior and sociality. My dissertation project will be an ethnographic study of how professional web teams in Stockholm work through contemporary social challenges through the medium of the web.

Education
M.A. Anthropology, University of Southern Mississippi, 2010.
B.S. Anthropology, Grand Valley State University, 2005.

Links


 

Edward Zegarra  Edward Zegarra

   PhD student
   Archaeologist, Ethnography
   ezegarr1@binghamton.edu
   Year admitted: 2010
   Advisor: William H. Isbell

 
Research Interests

Edward Zegarra's research focuses on understanding the structure, outcome, legacies, and prevalence of colonialism in the last 500 years with an emphasis on the intersections of heritage work and social justice efforts, particularly confronting historical erasures through archaeological research and community collaborations. His IRB-approved ethnographic dissertation fieldwork into sustainable management solutions at the archaeological site of Huari near Ayacucho, Peru has led to the development of his “Partnerships for Patrimony” stewardship program, which aims to establish institutional collaboration between local educators for the long-term protection and preservation of the site.

Conference Presentations

2016 Partnerships for Patrimony: A Community-based Approach to Sustainable Archaeological Preservation; Presented at 81st Annual SAA Conference, Orlando, FL

 2015 Cultural Resources in the Modern World: the Power of the Tangible Past in Constructing the Future in the Age of a Global Economy; Guest lecture at Pacaycasa High School (in Spanish in Ayacucho, Peru)

2013 The Relationship Between Form and Function: A Statistical Analysis of Use Wear Patterns on Wari Heartland Ceramics [MA thesis]; Poster Presented at 78th Annual SAA Conference, Honolulu, HI

2012 Ritual Roof Torching atop the Summit of Cerro Mejia Paper Presented at 77th Annual SAA Conference, Memphis, TN

Grants/Awards

Clark Fellowship 2010-2015
Sustainable Communities Transdisciplinary Areas of Excellence Grant 2015
Rosa Collechio Travel Award for Dissertation Research Enhancement 2016
Binghamton University Anthropology Dept. Dissertation Year Funding Spring 2017


 

Yang Zhan  Yang Zhan

   PhD student
   Sociocultural Anthropologist
   yzhan1@binghamton.edu
   Year admitted: 2008
   Advisor: Carmen Ferradas

Research Interests

Morality and the State; Migrant Workers; the Experience of State Power; Urban Space;

Publications

2015  “My Life is Elsewhere”: Social Exclusion, Stratified Urban Space and Rural Migrant Consumption of Homeownership. Dialectical Anthropology 39 (4): 405-422.

 

Yukun Zeng  Yukun Zeng

   MA/PhD student
   Linguistic Anthropologist
   yzeng11@binghamton.edu  
   Year Admitted: 2012
   Advisor: Douglas Glick
  

Research interests
Linguistic anthropology, Language ideologies, Reading, Semiotics, Censorship, Digital Anthropology, STS, Science Popularization, China.

Current Projects
1)  How the metapragmatics about how to read ancient Chinese texts is recontextualized in contemporary Chinese education
2)  Internet censorship and surveillance, the ideology of censorship, the semiotics of censorship, the genealogy of escapers from/against censorship (Solzhenitsyn, Snowden and etc.) and their effects
3)  A STS study about unit/dimension/quality
4)  Language ideologies and metaculture of China
5)  How to revise Foucauldian governmentality-oriented method to better describe contemporary China 6) Rhizomean theoretical reading

https://binghamton.academia.edu/ZengYukun


 

Last Updated: 10/17/16