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Undergraduate Courses in Anthropology

ANTH 111, INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY

A historically organized look at the broad evolution of humans and humanity. Starts with general processes of biological change, turns to comparison with primates and interpretation of the fossil record. As human capacities for culture increase, so does reliance on learned behavior and the diversity of adaptations to environment. General processes of cultural change contribute to understanding how and why current cultural adaptations exist, leading to consideration of the variety of ways humans have organized themselves into societies.

ANTH 114 (also LING 114), LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND COMMUNICATION IN THE U.S.

Introduction to the plurality of communication patterns in the U.S., with particular attention to at least three of the following communities: African American, American Indian, Asian American, European American and Latino American; links between cultural groups and different communication and discourse patterns; language and identity; ways in which communication differences affect intercultural interaction.

ANTH 117, SEX, FOOD, DRUGS, DISEASE AND RELIGION

Topical issues related to sex, food, drugs, disease and religion will be introduced within a traditional framework of Western thought, contrasted with non-traditionally Western practices, and then discussed within the context of our increasingly interconnected global society. Lectures will be given by a team of anthropology faculty and graduate students.

ANTH 118 (also LING 118), INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTIC STRUCTURES

Basic methods and concepts of linguistic analysis, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics.

ANTH 124, MULTICULTURALISM IN THE 21ST CENTURY

Anthropological perspective on social and cultural diversity in the Western and non-Western worlds. Explores four main axes of diversity: class, race, gender and sexuality.

ANTH 125, BURIED CITIES AND LOST TRIBES

Human past as seen through examination of some great archaeological sites of world, such as Stonehenge, King Tut's tomb, Mesa Verde, Moundville, Teotihuacan, Olduvai Gorge, Pompeii, pyramids of Gaza, Sutton Hoo ship burial, Ur, Nazca.

ANTH 126 (also WOMN 126), WOMEN AND CULTURE

Anthropological approaches to the study of women and gender. Cross-cultural and comparative, with case studies drawn from Western and non-Western societies. Topics include constructions of gender, sex and sexuality, beauty, women in the workforce, women and violence.

ANTH 128, HUMAN VIOLENCE

Considers the many forms taken by violence; different historical periods, different cultures. Variety of data to study violence, including artifacts, literature, ethnographic observations, historical documents. Different theories of violence, proposals for its control.

ANTH 130, CULTURES IN COLLISION

Anthropological perspective on colonial encounters between natives and newcomers during the European oceanic explorations of the 15th century and thereafter. Emphasis upon early centuries of contact and the consequences that emerged from these encounters.

ANTH 166, INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Surveys anthropological approaches to culture and society. Explores the different theories anthropologists use to understand how peoples' lives are shaped through social relations that vary historically, geographically, and cross-culturally. Key topics covered include political economy, history, colonialism, kinship, gender, expressive culture, material culture, politics, economics, and globalization. Emphasis on ethnographic case studies that clarify anthropology's distinctive methodology of participant observation and long-term fieldwork.

ANTH 167, INTRODUCTION TO PREHISTORIC ARCHAEOLOGY

Comprehensively surveys the methods and theories employed to recover archaeological data and interpret the prehistoric past through material culture; case studies from different cultures around the world are studied as illustrations. Throughout the course emphasis is given to how archaeology is anthropological and to the relevance of archaeology to contemporary societies. Course provides the foundation for evaluating and understanding the goals, data, and results of archaeological research.

ANTH 168, INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Basic concepts and principles of organic evolution of humans. Living primate biology, behavior and history. Human origins and evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record and from genetic comparisons. Human population variation and continuing adaptation. Lab sections teach skills for making inferences about evolution, health, demography, and adaptation utilizing measurements and analyses of genetic, skeletal, and anthropometric data.

ANTH 169, HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

Introduces the growing field of historical archaeology, including the relationship of historical archaeology to prehistoric archaeology and to history. Surveys the methods and theories of historical archaeology; case studies emphasize the use of documents and the material record. Involves participation in ongoing historical archaeology research in local area. Throughout the course emphasis is given to how archaeology is anthropological and to the relevance of archaeology to contemporary societies.

ANTH 200, QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics and their use in anthropological problems. Computer applications in quantitative anthropological research.

ANTH 214 (also LING 214/WOMN 214), LANGUAGE, SEX AND GENDER

Theoretical and empirical aspects of the relationship between language and the sexes. Sexism in linguistic structures: sex- and gender-determined patterns of language use; social and psychological implications of sex registers.

ANTH 219 (also LING 270), LANGUAGE AND THE SITCOM

Focus on the American television genre of the situation comedy. History of the genre is reviewed. Emphasis on aesthetic appreciation of the written art of its structure. Consideration of the socio-political implications for social change and general themes of the role of comedy in culture and society explored throughout. Lecture and discussion format. Prerequisite: ANTH/LING 114 or 118, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 221 (also WOMN 221), ANTHROPOLOGY OF SEX AND SEXUALITY

Introduces students to the anthropological study of sexualities in Euro-American and non-Western societies, including the place of sexuality in their colonial/imperial relationships. Particular attention paid to links between sexuality and race/racisms, class, and gender hierarchies. Case studies and topics range from transgender sex workers in Brazil to concubinage in colonial Southeast Asia, HIV/AIDS, arranged marriages in India, globalization and queer identity, Trobriand Islanders' love magic, sex toy parties in the U.S., and more.

ANTH 225, CULTURES AND CRISIS

Comparative study of movements of cultural reform; nativistic, revival, and utopian movements; religious manifestations.

ANTH 227, INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Introduces students to the field of visual anthropology through emphasis on: 1) the use of visual material in anthropological research and in the presentation and consumption of anthropological knowledge, focusing particularly on photography and film; and 2) visuality itself as a domain of anthropological inquiry, exploring ways of seeing in culturally and historically specific contexts. Particular attention will be paid to the relationships between seeing, being seen, and modern formations of identity.

ANTH 234, ARCHAEOLOGY AND ART

Course investigates visual representation from archaeological contexts ranging from 30,000 to 1,000 years ago. Media such as Paleolithic cave paintings, Southwest pottery, Etruscan tomb paintings and statuary, Mayan stelae and figurines, and aboriginal rock art are studied by both art historians and archaeologists. Taking an anthropological perspective, this course investigates the kinds of questions and insights this ancient art can offer us into human relationships across the millennia. Previous knowledge of archaeology is useful but not required.

ANTH 243, MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY: HUMAN BIOLOGY AND HEALTH

Biocultural approach to health and disease in human populations. Health inspected from epidemiologic, genetic, environmental, child growth perspectives. Prerequisite: ANTH 111.

ANTH 244, PLAGUES, CULTURE AND HISTORY

Overview of how plagues and epidemics have shaped human history. Examines how social transformations such as sedentism, animal and plant domestication and urbanism have produced novel forms of human/disease interactions. How infectious disease has been conceptualized at different times and by different cultural groups and treated as a threat to the social order. Currently, epidemics of new, highly virulent infectious diseases are occurring globally. Causes of this phenomenon and its implications for the future health of humans are explored.

ANTH 245, BONES, BUGS AND FORENSIC SCIENCE

An introduction to the multiple disciplines of forensic science in the U.S. Emphasis on forensic anthropology; also covers forensic DNA analysis, fingerprint and trace evidence, toxicology, entomology, pathology, engineering, odontology, criminalistics, psychology and questioned documents. Students also gain an appreciation for the law, rules of evidence and ethics in forensic science.

ANTH 246, SEX AND EVOLUTION

Reproducing sexually is costly in evolutionary terms. Given that organisms may reproduce asexually, transmitting 100% of their genes instead of 50%, generating identical genotypes instead of risky new ones, and circumventing the problem of finding mates, how could sexual reproduction have evolved in the face of such extensive costs? This course lays a foundation in evolutionary theory by exploring why sex evolved, the ramifications of sexual reproduction, and the hypotheses of evolutionary models.

ANTH 247, HUMAN GENETICS

Covers basic genetics principles, genetics of human disease, molecular genetics approaches, population genetics and evolutionary genetics as they apply to humans and other primates. Lecture and discussion.

ANTH 248, DARWINIAN MEDICINE

Darwinian Medicine seeks to understand human health from an evolutionary perspective focusing on interactions between individuals (via behaviors), organisms, and environments, and to apply that to improving health practices and interventions. Students will learn to analyze novel diseases and generate expectations about why they exist, how they operate, what are keys to balancing them, and what we might expect in the future. Topics include: infectious diseases, toxins, aging, diet, addictions, cancers, and more.

ANTH 252, PEOPLES OF THE PACIFIC

The Pacific was the last major region of the globe to be settled by humans. The settlement of Near Oceania (New Guinea and the Northern Solomon Islands) is dated to the Pleistocene, while Remote Oceania (the remaining portion of Melanesia, Polynesia, and Micronesia) was not inhabited until the Holocene (less than 3,500 years ago). This course examines the archaeological, linguistic and biological diversities of the people of the Pacific that have formed the basis of our understanding of the settlement of this region.

ANTH 254, PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF THE MIDDLE EAST

Social economic and cultural changes in Southwest Asia and North Africa. Impact of labor migration on family life and traditional cultures in both urban and rural communities in the region. Myths and realities pertaining to Islam. Ethnicity and conflict in the area.

ANTH 255 (also LACS 255), INDIGENOUS PEOPLES OF TROPICAL LOWLAND SOUTH AMERICA

Emphasizes features shared by indigenous inhabitants throughout the area, as well as distinctive regional differences. Topics include: indigenous language, demography, religion, subsistence, kinship, warfare, trade, and the many internal and external threats that have historically affected indigenous peoples, and presently continue to imperil ethnic survival and self-determination. Emphasizes neo-tropical ecology, an appreciation of indigenous perception and worldview, and the crucial importance of historical interactions in affecting indigenous existence since the arrival of Columbus and continuing to shape indigenous reality and self-determination today.

ANTH 256 (also HIST 258), NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURE AND HISTORY

Narrative of U.S. history emphasizing the dynamic relationship of Native American cultures and history to European Americans, African Americans and Latino Americans. Focus on aboriginal cultures of North America and social and cultural changes that resulted from interactions with other ethnic/racial groups in U.S. Comparison and contrast of dynamics and results of Native American cultures' interactions with other groups through time. Impact of Native American cultures on global and national processes of change. Role of Native Americans in American institutions, ideology and belief.

ANTH 258, PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF EUROPE

Area study of Europe as a cultural, political, economic, social entity. Case study approach, featuring cases from northern, southern, eastern and western Europe. Identity, religion, migration, urban and rural development.

ANTH 260, ARCHAEOLOGY OF NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS

Prehistory of Native North American cultures, beginning with earliest known inhabitants of New World (pre-10,000 BC), ending with period of European contact and colonization (about AD 1600). Important archaeological discoveries in U.S. and Canada. Prerequisite: one from ANTH 111, 125, 167 or 256, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 261 (also JUST 261), ARCHAEOLOGY OF BIBLICAL LANDS

Prehistory and early history of Israel-Jordan-Palestine. Ancient societies and their interactions with a diverse and difficult environment, from the times of early sedentary societies to the Roman Empire. Relationships to external powers such as Egypt, Mesopotamia and the Roman Empire. Problems of archaeological identification of biblical sites and controversies over the modern use of archaeology in the political conflict between Arab states and Israel. Prerequisite: prior coursework in archaeology and/or Judaic studies, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 262, ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS OF PERU

Examines human arrival, early hunting and gathering societies, origins of agriculture and the evolution of civilization among indigenous peoples of South America. Archaeological data are used to explore the rise of social inequality and political complexity, the origin of state governments, the development of great art and architecture, and other spectacular achievements of archaic civilizations in Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Chile and Northwest Argentina. Visual materials acquaint students with the great sites, as well as with art, architecture, religious ideology, technology and environments.

ANTH 263, ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE INCAS AND SOUTH AMERICAN EMPIRES

A comprehensive introduction to Inca civilization. Understanding Inca culture, how they conquered and reorganized other Andean states, and how they experienced the world about them. Employing archaeology, post-invasion history, and modern ethnography, we examine the capital of Cuzco— imperial palaces, strange temples, spectacularly terraced valleys— Inca origins, myths, religion, language, military might, provincial administration, economy, and household life. Surviving Spanish domination and the integration into the modern global world?

ANTH 273, NORTHERN IRELAND: POLITICS AND IDENTITY

Examines historical and contemporary dimensions of identity and political conflict and accommodation in Northern Ireland today. Draws from anthropology, history, political science and sociology to explore the ethnic, religious, class and territorial forces which have brought Northern Ireland world-wide attention. Course focuses include: conflict and peace initiatives in terms of their effects on everyday life in urban and rural localities throughout Northern Ireland, ethnographic analyses, political devolution and economic change, integration in the European Union, and globalization.

ANTH 275, FOOD, DRINK, IDENTITY

Food and drink and the social practices associated with their consumption are integral aspects of identity around the globe. This course examines eating and drinking behaviors and their roles in the construction of national, ethnic, class, gender, local and other identities in the Americas, Europe, Asia and Africa. It also explores how various ways of dining and drinking alcohol are affected by globalization.

ANTH 277, FOOD, CONSUMPTION AND THE BODY

This course will combine a critical reading of the cultural meanings of food with an examination of the political economy of food production and consumption. Class discussions include the following: taste, class, and "high cuisines"; food and gender; food crises; global politics of food; the spaces of food production and consumption; "gourmet" and "ethnic" foods; food disorders; body image.

ANTH 280, TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

Particular themes and topics determined in advance. May be taken more than once if topic varies.

ANTH 281, TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

Particular themes and topics determined in advance. May be repeated for credit if topic varies.

2 cr.

ANTH 300, HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL THOUGHT

Anthropological thought in West from earliest times to present: 19th and 20th centuries, corresponding to period of emergence of anthropology as academic discipline. Developments related to broader historical context of changing social, political, economic circumstances. Role and significance of contemporary anthropology; correlative developments in sociology, psychology, human biology. Prerequisite: ANTH 111 or 166.

ANTH 312 (also LING 312) , PHONETICS AND PHONOLOGY

Principles and mechanisms of speech production and perception. Practice in phonological analysis and theory. Special attention to cross-linguistic differences in sound systems. Counts toward Harpur distribution requirements as either humanities or social sciences. Prerequisite: ANTH/LING 118.

ANTH 314 (also LING 314) , MORPHOLOGY AND SYNTAX

Issues and problems in morphological and syntactic theory. Universal, typological and other comparative analytic aspects of morphosyntax. Counts toward Harpur distribution requirements as either humanities or social sciences. Prerequisite: ANTH /LING 118, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 325 (also LING 355), LANGUAGE AND ADVERTISING

Course explores the structure and role of advertising as a dominant institution in the U.S. Inter-disciplinary readings and cross-cultural perspectives are relied upon. The construction of advertisements in different media are explored. Linguistic and other cultural signs are studied in terms of their rhetorical effectiveness. Classic social scientific issues relating to stereotyping, equality and prejudice are also considered throughout. Prerequisite: ANTH/LING 114 or 118.

ANTH 332, FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY

Variation in the human skeleton studied at an advanced level for the purposes of personal identification. Every aspect of forensic anthropological investigation is covered, from search and recovery to the techniques of individual identification from human skeletal remains to report preparation and court testimony. Skeletal pathology as a marker for personal identification is emphasized, while cause of death is inferred through the interpretation of skeletal trauma to bone. Prerequisites: both ANTH 168 and ANTH 336.

ANTH 334, COMPARATIVE ASPECTS OF HUMAN GROWTH

Human growth processes from conception to old age; biological aspects of growth, with consideration of secular trends, individual and population variations, and cultural factors that may influence biological growth processes. Prerequisite: ANTH 168.

ANTH 335, HUMAN ORIGINS

Fossil evidence for human evolution. Evolutionary mechanisms and systematics. The earliest hominids from Africa, the emergence of genus Homo and the evolution of humans in the Pleistocene. Lecture and laboratory sections. Prerequisite: ANTH 168.

ANTH 336, THE HUMAN SKELETON

Human skeletal anatomy, including interpopulation comparisons, sex and age determination, pathology, osteometry, statistical treatment of measurements; applications to paleodemographic population reconstruction. Laboratory sessions arranged. Prerequisite: ANTH 168.

ANTH 337, HUMAN BIOLOGICAL VARIATION

Processes controlling biological variation in modern populations, interaction of environmental factors with genetic material of populations, human adaptation to climate, altitude, population density and stress. Prerequisite: ANTH 168.

ANTH 338, INTRODUCTION TO THE PRIMATES

Biology and behavior of the non-human primates. Classification, ecology, function and comparative anatomy of prosimians, monkeys and apes. Paleontology of the order is considered, along with the evolution of social behavior. Prerequisite: ANTH 168.

ANTH 342, ICE AGE EUROPE THROUGH FICTION

In this course, we focus on works of fiction that have taken as their subject the life of people during the Ice Age in Europe. Once we have read these, what kinds of lasting effects do they have on how we think about Ice Age Europe? What is the relationship between popular culture, fiction, use of the imagination and scholarly archaeology and anthropology? Prerequisite: ANTH 167 or 169.

ANTH 345, HISTORIC AMERICAN MATERIAL CULTURE

Examines how historical archaeologists analyze the material culture of the Europeans and European Americans who colonized and occupied the North American continent from the 17th through early 20th centuries. Emphasis on the manufacturing processes involved in the production of different classes of material culture and their use by European Americans and non-European Americans. Prerequisite: ANTH 167 or 169 or one prior archaeology course.

ANTH 346, STONE AGE ARCHAEOLOGY

Investigations of human biocultural evolution and adaptations during Old Stone Age, primarily in Old World; hunter-gatherers as models, kinds of Paleolithic data; how archaeologists research, excavate, reconstruct the past. Prerequisite: ANTH 125 or 167, or one archaeology course.

ANTH 348, ANCIENT ENVIRONMENT AND SUBSISTENCE

Offers a comprehensive introduction to the materials and methods used by archaeologists to construct inferences about ancient environments and subsistence from clues that survive in the buried record. Lectures and laboratory demonstrations critically examine the accumulation, preservation, recovery, analysis and interpretation of archaeobotanical and archaeozoological data. Prerequisite: either ANTH 167 or 169, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 349, VISUALIZING DIFFERENCES

Explores the power of the visual to produce gender, racial and ethnic differences. Focuses particularly on three interlinked spheres of imagery— ethnographic film, world's fairs and museums— to explore the ways in which "difference" is produced and rendered intelligible. Attention is paid to the ways in which specific anthropological approaches have been taken up within each of these domains.

ANTH 354, GENDER AND POWER: ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES

Examines productions of gender difference in varying cultural and historical contexts; processes through which gender difference is tied to social power and subordination; relationships between gender and other differences ("race," sexuality, class, nation); roles of colonialism, capitalism and other transnational processes in shaping productions of gender and power. Prerequisite: ANTH 126, 166 or 221 or WOMN 100, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 362, BORDERS, BOUNDARIES AND FRONTIERS

This course will examine historical and contemporary anthropological perspectives on social and political borders, boundaries and frontiers. It will explore the changing nature of the political anthropology of territory, identity and social order, as they relate to the key concepts of community, ethnic group, region, nation and state, and the course will focus on the current anthropology of international borders within a context of globalization. Prerequisite: ANTH 166 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 363, ANTHROPOLOGY OF DEVELOPING NATIONS

Social, political and economic change in the Third World. Articulation of rural production systems with world market. Analysis of rural and urban development, famine, population, poverty, inequality and powerlessness. Economic and environmental impacts of United Nations, World Bank and other development organizations.

ANTH 364, POLITICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

The course will explore how anthropological analysis can provide meaningful access to crucial forms of political struggle. The fears and aspirations of a range of political actors—from urban street fighters to peasant insurgents—will be scrutinized. A series of major political movements will be examined from the standpoint of participants who are pursuing radical reform and transformation of the human condition. Prerequisite: 100 or 200 level anthropology course.

ANTH 365, CONSUMPTION, CULTURE AND MODERNITY

This course examines how consumption has been linked to modernity and postmodernity. It focuses on both political economic and cultural interpretations of consumption. Topics include: gendered nature of consumption; markets, commodities and gifts; style; fashion; aestheticization; spaces and places of consumption; shopping; ethical and green consumption; inequality; consumer culture. Discussions will focus on how consumption is linked to concerns with the self, identity, and the individual. Prerequisite: ANTH 166 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 366, ANTHROPOLOGY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

We will explore in this course the challenges posed in adapting ethnographic practices to examine issues of knowledge production in domains of science and technology. Prerequisite: ANTH 166 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 367, IRISH/BRITISH SOCIETY/CULTURE

Examines historical and contemporary dimensions of society and culture in Ireland and Britain, with a particular focus on Ireland, England and Scotland. Draws on anthropological and sociological perspectives to trace development of ethnographic approaches to Irish and British cultures, in cities and countryside, from the origins of community studies to current issues of nationalism, race, ethnicity, and regionalism. Course concludes with considerations of globalization, Europeanization, and migration as forces changing everyday life in Britain and Ireland today. Prerequisite: ANTH 166 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 369, CONTEMPORARY PACIFIC ISLANDERS

Examines the contemporary societies of the peoples of the three major culture areas of the Pacific: Polynesia, Melanesia, and Micronesia. Through ethnographies and films, students explore the vibrant cultural productions of Pacific Islanders: from rituals of manhood in Papua New Guinea to competitive Polynesian dance/chant groups in Tahiti to Bikini Islanders who survived U.S. nuclear testing on their islands, and more. Topics examined include politics, economics, religion, gender, sexuality, kinship, globalization, postcoloniality, and the continuing legacies of colonialism. Prerequisite: ANTH 111 or 166 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 370, NATIVE AMERICA TODAY

Examination of the history of the struggle of Native Americans to survive over the past 500 years as background to a consideration of contemporary Native American life through such topics as education, health, law, art, culture and stereotypes. Prerequisite: ANTH 256/HIST 268.

ANTH 372, FIELD METHODS OF ARCHAEOLOGY

Students participate in archaeological research project. Research designs. Instruction, practice in basic field techniques of excavation, surface survey, mapping, photography, cataloging. Prerequisites: ANTH 111 or 167 and ANTH 256 or 260 (recommended).

Summer only, 6 cr.

ANTH 373, ZOOARCHAEOLOGY

Systematic introduction to techniques, methods and goals of vertebrate zooarchaeology. Recovery, preservation, identification, quantification and interpretation of non-human animal remains within framework of vertebrate taphonomy. Laboratory sessions examine non-human skeletal materials with an emphasis on phylogeny and biomechanics of locomotion. Prerequisites: ANTH 167 or 168, ANTH 336 preferred, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 374, ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE MIDDLE EAST

Overview of the archaeology of the prehistoric and early historic periods resulting from nearly two centuries of archaeological work in the Middle East. Focus on the principal research questions that have guided archaeological work in the region and how archaeologists have tried to answer them. Prerequisite: one prior archaeology course.

ANTH 375 (also AFST 374), ARCHAEOLOGY OF AFRICA

Covering the period from the earliest archaeological traces (ca. 2 million years ago) through the rise of complex polities in the last millennium, this course traces the complexity of human social and cultural development in the African continent with an emphasis on Africa south of the Sahara. Emphasis placed on how archaeologists approach reconstruction of the African past and on critical evaluation of archaeological interpretation. Prerequisite: ANTH 111, 125 or 167.

ANTH 376, THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF FRONTIERS

Examines boundaries, frontiers and the processes of colonization from an archaeological perspective focusing on the European expansion beginning in the 15th century and continuing into the 20th century. Prerequisite: ANTH 111, 130, 169 or other course in archaeology.

ANTH 377, EMPIRES OF THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST

Discussion and analysis of models of the development, structure and disintegration of empires. Discussion of the role of recent political theory (including Foucault, Galtung, feminist theory, underdevelopment theory) on the analysis of ancient empires. Examples from the ancient Near East serve to underscore the variability of imperial realities. Prerequisite: one prior archaeology course.

ANTH 378, ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST

Archaeology of the southwest United States and northwest Mexico, ca. 10,000 BC– AD 1600, from the Paleoindian and Archaic periods, through the ceramic cultures, to European contact. Highlights include the first Americans, Chaco Canyon, Mesa Verde, Hohokam trade and ballcourts, and contemporary Native American perspectives. Prerequisite: one from ANTH 111, 125, 167, 169, 235 or 256, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 379, AMAZONIAN ARCHAEOLOGY

Comprehensive introduction to the prehistory of the Amazon basin and surrounding lowland neo-tropical areas. Lectures and discussion critically examine evidence for environmental heterogeneity, increased temporal depth of human occupation during the Holocene, densely populated and culturally complex societies, and agricultural systems different from those practiced in the area today. Prerequisite: ANTH 167 or 255.

ANTH 380, SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

Particular themes and problems determined in advance. May be repeated for credit if topic varies.

ANTH 381, TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

Particular themes and topics determined in advance. May be repeated for credit if topic varies.

2 cr.

ANTH 394 (also GLST 394), STUDY ABROAD EXPERIENCE

Prepares students with knowledge and skills to make the most out of study abroad. Emphasizes action-oriented learning and reflective writing for exploring cultural, geographic, sociological, and historical features of destination(s); intercultural learning, adjustment, and communication; analyzing relationships between students' own and host cultures' values and customs; interrogating meanings of cultural identity, including stereotypes; relating study abroad learning to prior and future academic and career plans. Taught online winter and summer sessions.

1 cr.

ANTH 426, ANCIENT DNA AND FORENSICS LABORATORY

This wet lab course teaches students core lab techniques of ancient DNA research, including DNA extraction from ancient bones, teeth, hair, and tissue, and PCR amplification and sequencing of extracted DNA. Species and human population identifications are employed using genetic data. Phylogenetic and population genetic inference techniques are taught to analyze the data. Special emphasis given to techniques for PCR amplification of inhibited DNA and sterile techniques for preventing modern DNA contamination. Prerequisite: ANTH 168 or 247.

ANTH 428, MOLECULAR LAB

This is a wet lab course that teaches students the core lab techniques in molecular anthropology, including some combination of DNA extraction, PCR, RFLP typing, STR typing, Electrophoresis and DNA sequencing. The course also involves making inferences from the data collected using phylogenetic techniques. Prerequisite: ANTH 168 or 247.

ANTH 443 (also LING 443), LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND SEMIOTICS

Introduction to semiotic theories of meaning in anthropology, linguistics and other related fields. Focuses on the contextual mediation of cultural meaning through various typologies of signs. Different semiotic methods and techniques contrasted. Analyses developed for broadly cultural and specifically linguistic projects. Problems of interpretation and their relation to science explored throughout. Prerequisite: ANTH/LING 114 or 118.

ANTH 445, LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY

Course introduces students to various anthropological approaches to the study of human language. It explores how language, itself an essential element "in and of" culture, participates in cultural representation and, more broadly, in social communication. Language is also explored as it has been used as a model for other aspects of human culture and cognition. Prerequisite: ANTH/LING 114 or 118.

ANTH 451, POLITICAL ECOLOGY

The course is concerned with the politics of ecology under capitalism. It focuses on cultural representations of nature and the current environmental crisis. Discussions will address current debates on scarcity, population growth, sustainability, the privatization of nature, global warming, bioregionalism, biopower, nature/capital, ecological movements, cities and nature, and environmental planning. Readings draw from theoretical traditions in the social sciences and humanities. Prerequisite: ANTH 166 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 453, ETHNOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS

Ethnography is an intellectual method by which our subjects and we experiment with the nature of thought and action in our time, the practical and ethical contingencies that mediate our communicative action, our sentiments, our expectations, and our lives together. In this seminar we will read a series of texts that pursue these possibilities. Prerequisite: ANTH 166.

ANTH 454, KINSHIP, GENDER AND SEXUALITY

Examines differences and power through focus on kinship, gender, and sexuality. Explores relationships between "nature" and culture; "naturalization" of social differences and hierarchies; how kinship binds people to social structures; how ideologies of kinship, gender, and sexuality shape larger social projects. Case studies include "family values" campaigns, gay marriage debates, prostitution, new reproductive technologies, queer subcultures, colonialism, nationalism. Prerequisite: ANTH 166 or 221 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 455, CULTURES OF EXPERTISE

The seminar examines the challenges posed in adapting ethnographic practices to analyze diverse settings such as science labs, experimental arts programs, and financial institutions. The issue that draws together these studies is how experts create, manage, and manipulate knowledge within contexts in which "research," broadly conceived, plays a decisive role. Prerequisite: ANTH 166.

ANTH 457, CULTURES OF CAPITALISM

This seminar examines how capitalism is mediating the human condition in a range of contemporary contexts and settings. The central concern of the course is how to address the theoretical and the methodological challenges of studying cultures of capitalism ethnographically. Indeed, we will focus continuously on generating ethnographic scenarios for probing the operations of distinctive features of contemporary political economy. Prerequisite: ANTH 166.

ANTH 461, THIRD WORLD FEMINISMS AND NATIONALISM

Examines the histories and politics of feminisms developed in the Global South as these have taken shape in relation to nationalism and anticolonial struggle. Course projects include critical interrogation of the categories "women," "Third World," and "feminism"; exploring Third World feminist engagements with colonialism, imperialism, neoliberalism, racism, and modernity; and the relationships between theory, experience, and identity in feminist projects and the politics of representation. Prerequisite: ANTH 166 or 221 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 463, SEXUALITY STUDIES SEMINAR

Examines current work in sexuality studies, emphasizing ethnographic studies but extending to historical and interdisciplinary scholarship. Specific topics will vary by offering but include questions of methodology and the politics of representation. Central course projects will explore how sexuality is articulated through social differences of gender, race, class, nation, and colonial experience and thus how sexuality articulates with power/ knowledge formations and relations of privilege and subordination. Prerequisite: ANTH 166 or 221 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 465, THE BODY

Examines how bodies are produced as socially meaningful and in what embodiment consists, drawing on social theories of gender and sexedness, identity and difference, sexuality, heteronormativity, and racialization. Investigates how large-scale social processes (colonialism, nationalism, neoliberalism) are interpolated through specific bodies. Explores cultural differences in understandings of the body and enactments of embodiment and, thus, comparative questions about materiality, performativity, and bodies as cultural artifacts. Prerequisite: ANTH 166 or 221 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 466 (also LING 466/PSYC 406), PSYCHOLINGUISTICS

Survey of psycholinguistics. Theoretical issues, research methods and substantive findings in study of language perception, production and acquisition. Models of language performance and its emergence in children. Prerequisite: ANTH/LING 118 or PSYC 220, 355 or 356 or PHIL 215 or 225.

ANTH 472, EXPERIMENTAL ARCHAEOLOGY

Course addresses the history, theory, and methods of experimental archaeology. Experimental archaeology has been invaluable in archaeological interpretation, and an understanding of how this field has developed is useful in multiple aspects of the interpretation of material culture. In this class, students can expect to learn how to design and carry out an archaeological experiment, as well as learn the limits of experimentation in a range of material specialties. Prerequisite: ANTH 125, 167, or 169 or one 200-level or higher archaeology course.

ANTH 474, ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH AND THEORY

In-depth overview of contemporary theory and methods in archaeology and the conduct of archaeological research. Central focus on research design: how do archaeologists formulate research questions, carry out field, laboratory, and library-based work to address those questions, and analyze and interpret their evidence? Consideration of ways research designs differ depending upon researchers' theoretical, methodological, and ethical perspectives. Lecture and discussion formats. Presentation of material at advanced level assumes students have considerable background in archaeology. Prerequisite: ANTH 125, 167, 169 and/or upper-level (200+) archaeology courses.

ANTH 475, LABORATORY METHODS IN ARCHAEOLOGY

Post-excavation study of materials recovered, instruction and practice in laboratory analysis of artifactual materials, methods of typological classification, interpretation of analytical results, illustration and writing of archaeological reports. Prerequisites: ANTH 167 and ANTH 372.

ANTH 476, MUSEUMS AND THE ART OF EXHIBITIONS

An introduction to museums and their relationship to the public. Includes an overview of the history of exhibiting material culture in museums. The main aim is to mount an exhibit of material from the recent past in the Binghamton area, collected by course participants. Students learn to create appropriate texts to accompany the exhibited material and to arrange an exhibit space at Binghamton University. This is done in conjunction with theoretical readings about the planning of museum spaces. Prerequisite: ANTH 166, 167 or 169, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 477, FIELD METHODS IN ETHNOGRAPHY

Socio-cultural anthropology field practicum in local community. Research design, independent fieldwork using participant observation, other appropriate techniques. Prerequisite: one prior sociocultural anthropology course.

ANTH 480, TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

Particular themes and topics determined in advance. May be taken more than once if topic varies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTH 481, TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

Particular themes and topics determined in advance. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

2 cr.

ANTH 490/492 (also GLST 490/492), GLOBAL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR

Engages students in cross-disciplinary work to examine global/local issues through a holistic approach. Students must attend weekly class meetings; prepare, present, and attend end-of-term student presentations on capstone projects; and submit a reflective report relating their internationally-oriented coursework, language courses, study-abroad experiences, capstone project, and related studies to their education and personal and career goals. 490: 2 cr.; 492: 4 cr. (Enrollment in 492 requires instructor's permission and student's submission of an acceptable prospectus for an ambitious capstone project). Prerequisite: ANTH/GLST 394. Taught in fall and spring semesters.

ANTH 491, PRACTICUM IN COLLEGE TEACHING

Independent study in teaching a particular Anthropology course. Assignments are directed by course instructor and may include: development of course materials (syllabus, assignments, exams); reading exams; lecturing and leading discussions; laboratory supervision; academic counseling of students. May be repeated for no more than 8 credits total; credit may not be earned in conjunction with student enrolling in course. May not be used to satisfy major or Harpur College Distribution requirements. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and departmental Director of Undergraduate Studies. Pass/Fail only.

ANTH 495, INTERNSHIP PROJECT

Internship project under guidance of faculty member, in an institution, agency or program. Requires consent of instructor. Four credits may be counted toward the major.

1-4 cr.

ANTH 497, INDEPENDENT WORK

Meets special needs and interests of advanced students on tutorial or seminar basis. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and departmental Director of Undergraduate Studies.

1-4 cr.

ANTH 499, SENIOR HONORS

Prerequisites: consent of instructor and Director of Undergraduate Studies.

1-4 cr.

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Last Updated: 8/20/12