Division of the Humanities 
Art


Faculty

*Year of initial appointment at Binghamton

Bell, Donald, Professor, MFA, 1965, Indiana University: Painting, photography, illustration, graphic design. (1968)*

DeMauro, Don, Associate Professor, Chouinard Art Institute, 1956-60, Guggenheim Fellow, 1971: Painting, drawing, printmaking. (1970)

Ippolito, Angelo, Professor Emeritus, 1971, Ozenfant School of Fine Arts; 1959, Fulbright Fellow: 1979, Louis Tiffany Foundation Award: Painting, collage, assemblage, sculpture, photography. (1969)

Schwartz, Aubrey, Professor Emeritus, Art Students League, 1950; Guggenheim Fellow 1958-60: Drawing, printmaking. (1969)

Shapiro, David, Associate Professor, 1971, New York Studio School; 1971-73, Prix de Roma: Painting, drawing. (1973)

Sokolowski, Linda, Professor, MFA, 1970, University of Iowa: Drawing, printmaking, painting. (1971)

Stark, James, Associate Professor, BS, 1968, Western Michigan University and Interlochen Arts Academy: Sculpture, assemblage, environ mental works, foundry processes. (1970)

Thomson, John, Associate Professor and Chair, MS, 1968, University of Wisconsin: Environmental design, drawing, industrial design. (1975)

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Studio Art Program

    The curriculum in studio art provides experiences for the liberal arts student who wishes to explore studio practices as an elective, as well as two degree programs: a 10-course, 40-credit program leading to the BA degree, and a more intensive 17-1/2 course, 74 credit hour program leading to the BFA degree.
    The studio program is supported by a generous endowment: the Elsie Benensohn Rosefsky Visiting Artists Series.
    The studio program is enhanced by events and activities in the Rosefsky Studio Art Gallery, which presents an on-going series of exhibitions including visiting artists, alumni artists, BFA candidate solo shows, lectures, and seminars.
    The studio program is also supported by the Art Student Co-op, a student-organized and operated source for art supplies.
    For all beginning and intermediate courses, the quality of work done determines whether the student can repeat a course for further development. The decision for such action is a result of mutual consent of the student, the instructor, and the program chair. A repeated course receives credit and fulfills the major requirements.
    Transfer students must present a portfolio to the program chair for placement in addition to regular transfer procedures. At that time, the portfolio review committee reserves the right to set a minimum number of credit hours to be completed by the student and may require the student to repeat a course to satisfy requirements for graduation with a studio art major.
    Majors in studio art may elect the P/F grade option in only two studio and/or art history courses.

Requirements for Studio Art Major-BA Degree

In the Department    number of credits 
1. Three level-one courses from ARTS 111, 
    121, 131,141, 171 
12
(These courses must be completed prior to registration for 
ARTS 481, 482, 483, 484, 485, 487, 488) 
2. One art history  4
3. One from ARTS 481, 482, 483, 484, 485, 486, 487, 488  4
4. Five studio art electives  20
TOTAL   40

Requirements for Studio Art Major-BFA Degree

Admission to the BFA degree program in studio art is by application, portfolio presentation, and interview only. This is initiated through the program chair.
     The BFA degree program in studio art requires the student to specialize in one of the five studio disciplines-drawing, painting, printmaking, two-dimensional design, or sculpture.
 credits 
1. Four level-I courses from 111, 131, 
    141, 171, with 171 required in the first two years 
16
2. Five elective courses from Level-II studio 
    disciplines by advisement (200-300 level) 
20
3. Five studio courses, by advisement, in one studio 
    discipline for specialization. 
20
4. Two art history courses by advisement  8
5. ARTS 288 4
6. Seminar in Studio Art (ARTS 496), 
    continuous registration once accepted to 
    BFA program 
1
7. Senior Exhibition Seminar (ARTS 499) 
    critique and exhibition 
2
    TOTAL  71

Honors Program

Departmental honors in studio are awarded to those majors who have completed a substantive body of significant work in one or more studio disciplines. Nominations for honors are submitted by individual faculty members, and the final decision rests with the entire studio faculty. Senior standing required.

Minor in Studio Art

A minor in studio art consists of a minimum of six courses distributed as follows:

1. Beginning, intermediate, and advanced level courses in one of these areas of concentration:  drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, 2-dimensional design.

2. An additional introductory level course in an area other than the chosen concentration.

3. Two courses chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor. One of these courses must be at the advanced 300-400 level, and may or may not be in the area of concentration.

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Studio Art: Undergraduate Courses

NOTE: Unless otherwise noted, all undergraduate courses carry 4 credits and are offered every year.

STUDIO ART: GRAPHIC DESIGN

The design sequence of arts 111, 211, 411, 481 is recommended for those students who wish to develop a concentration in graphic design. Additional fine arts courses should be taken as recommended by the design faculty. If available, one or two studio internships (ARTS 495) in professional workplaces during the senior year are suggested.

ARTS 111. GRAPHIC DESIGN I
Conceptual, analytical, and mechanical means of creating and reproducing images in value and color on two-dimensional surfaces. Enriches visual and verbal vocabulary of both art and non-art majors. Techniques presented include most of those needed and used by graphic designers. Problems given not applied, but theoretical, suited for the inexperienced as well as those with experience in other forms of visual arts.

ARTS 211. GRAPHIC DESIGN II
Problems in visual communication involving symbolism, photography, type, and other graphic processes. Continues and builds on concepts and problems offered in ARTS 111. Other graphic design techniques in latter half of semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 111.

ARTS 411. GRAPHIC DESIGN III
Primarily for majors; advanced problems in graphic de sign. Applied graphic communication problems (book, symbol, layout, etc.); some work in typography. Introduction to computer graphics. Advanced photo reproduction methods. Prerequisites: ARTS 111, 211.

ARTS 481. SPECIAL STUDIO PROJECTS: GRAPHIC DESIGN
For art majors, intermediate and advanced students who wish to extend work in graphic design. Students work independently within classroom structure. Prerequisites: completion of three required departmental beginning courses, and introductory and intermediate courses in two-dimensional design; consent of instructor.

ARTS 486. SPECIAL STUDIO PROJECTS: COMPUTER GRAPHICS
This is a graphic design course in which the medium is digital. Students develop a basic familiarity and competence with the MacIntosh and the most widely used soft ware for image generation, photo manipulation, and page layout. Prerequisite: ARTS 111 or permission of instructor.

STUDIO ART: THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN

ARTS 121. THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN I
Introduction to conceptual and structural aspects of three-dimensional design on theoretical basis. Use of simple materials such as wood, plastic, cardboard, etc.

ARTS 482. SPECIAL STUDIO PROJECT: THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN
For art majors and advanced students who wish to extend work in three-dimensional design. Prerequisites: completion of three departmental beginning courses, including the introductory course in three-dimensional design; consent of instructor. 

STUDIO ART: SCULPTURE

ARTS 131. SCULPTURE I
Basic problems in three-dimensional nonrepresentational form related to understanding of aesthetic and technical demands of sculptural media and expression.

ARTS 231. SCULPTURE II
Work from the human figure with armature and plastilene. Learning the structure of the human form and developing figure images from the model. Daily critiques. Prerequi sites: ARTS 131. Also available to majors without prereq uisite, but with faculty approval.

ARTS 234. SCULPTURE II: DIRECT METAL SCULPTURE
Students progress through the direct metal sculpture processes: soldering, brazing, oxy-acetylene welding and cut ting, arc welding, TIG welding. Faculty consent required. Enrollment limited.

ARTS 331. SCULPTURE II: FIGURE II
Special problems in using the figure as an expressive vehicle; emphasis on idea, composition, and technical development. Prerequisites: ARTS 131, 231.

ARTS 431. ADVANCED SCULPTURE
Problems independently conceived and developed in plastics, wood, stone, or metal. Figurative, non-figurative, foundry techniques, environmental work. Prerequisites: ARTS 131, 231, 171.

ARTS 434. SCULPTURE FOUNDRY
Provides participants with training through presentation and practice of art foundry procedures. Emphasis on lost wax or cire perdue method, with sand mold casting also available. All work cast in bronze. Each student can expect to complete three or four pieces of moderate dimension. All steps necessary to cast a piece discussed and practiced; conceptual work and criticism, wax work, mold making, metallurgy, the burnout and pour, repair, chasing, patina, and bases. Prerequisite: ARTS 131, 231 or consent of instructor. (Sometimes offered as special summer work shop.)

ARTS 435. SCULPTURE/PAPERMAKING
Emphasis on papermaking method as used for sculpture. Direct construction and mold making methods will be used. Prerequisites: ARTS 131, 231.

ARTS 483. SPECIAL STUDIO PROJECTS: SCULPTURE
For art majors and advanced students who wish to extend work in sculpture. Prerequisites: Completion of three departmental beginning courses, and introductory and intermediate courses in sculpture; consent of instructor.

STUDIO ART: PAINTING

ARTS 141. INTRODUCTION TO PAINTING
Classic problems in painting, concentrating on form, color, space with related subject matter still life, landscape, and figure. Individual instruction based on student's experience and needs. Materials and preparation of canvases. Recommended: ARTS 171.

ARTS 241. PAINTING II
Structured to more experienced painting student, who is encouraged to be experimental, and search for more personal expression through painting. Problems in painting: various painting media, including some examination of historical examples and techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 141.

ARTS 341. FIGURE AND PORTRAIT PAINTING
Figurative elements in painting, using various techniques, media, and concepts in relationship to live model, including historical and contemporary examples. Prerequisites: ARTS 141, 272.

ARTS 441. ADVANCED PAINTING
Exploration and experimentation in painting, on more individual basis, to develop personal form of expression. Prerequisites: ARTS 141, 241.

ARTS 484. SPECIAL STUDIO PROJECTS: PAINTING
For art majors and advanced students who wish to extend work in painting. Prerequisites: completion of three required departmental beginning courses, and introductory and intermediate courses in painting; consent of instructor.

STUDIO ART: PRINTMAKING

ARTS 251. PRINTMAKING I: ETCHINGS AND MONOTYPES
Etching involves the activities of drawing and painting on a metal plate that has been covered with a protective ground. A large part of this course deals with the making of the print; the traditional techniques of intaglio will be explored. Prerequisite: ARTS 171.

ARTS 351. PRINTMAKING II: ETCHINGS AND MONOTYPES
Emphasis is on the black and white image, gathered from organic sources, the figure, the skeleton, assorted bone and rock formations, the self, animals in motion. Prerequisite: ARTS 171, 251.

ARTS 352. MONOTYPE
The monotype is a single print pulled from a plate to paper on which ink or paint has been applied. Each impression remains a one-of-a-kind, unique because much of the initial image's pigment has been removed in succeeding prints. The process is a valuable teaching aid as it encourages the maker to use the ghost images remaining on the plate for future works. Prerequisites: ARTS 141 and 171.

ARTS 485. SPECIAL STUDIO PROJECTS: ETCHING
For art majors and advanced students who wish to extend work in etching, lithography, or collograph. Prerequisites: completion of three departmental beginning courses, and introductory and intermediate courses in etching; consent of instructor.

ARTS 488. SPECIAL STUDIO PROJECTS: LITHOGRAPHY
An introduction to the print technique of hand lithography for advanced students of drawing or painting. Prerequisites: ARTS 171, consent of instructor.

STUDIO ART: DRAWING

ARTS 171. DRAWING I
Introduction to practice of drawing for serious students. Drawing as working and thinking: series of open-ended interrelated problems dealing with seeing, visual language, vocabulary, organization, and necessary technical skills. Basic problems in drawing, intensifying perception and comprehension of form, space, line, volume, texture, structure, movement, composition. Instruction in use of various drawing materials and processes as means of personal investigation, understanding, and expression in relation to aspects of landscape, figure, and still life.

ARTS 176. THINKING DRAWING
Deals with development and use of drawing as fundamental tool for visual problem solving. Basic perspective drawing along with orthographic, oblique, and isometric systems covered, with introduction to architectural drawing convention. Fluent use of drawing as tool for problem solving, generation, analysis, and manipulation of ideas central aim of course. Some problems utilize small computers.

ARTS 271. INTERMEDIATE DRAWING
Problems in drawing. Various drawing media: some examination of historical examples and techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 171.

ARTS 272. LIFE DRAWING
Drawing from figure (model) in varied media, to develop a structural understanding of the figure. Using the figure as expressive vehicle. Prerequisite: ARTS 171.

ARTS 373. MIXED MEDIA TECHNIQUES
Examination of technical means as a method for investigating descriptive and formal visual questions. Variety of techniques including pastel, watercolor or acrylic, conte, and traditional drawing materials. Prerequisites: ARTS 171, 272.

ARTS 487. SPECIAL STUDIO PROJECTS: DRAWING
For art majors and advanced students who wish to extend work in drawing. Prerequisites: completion of three required departmental beginning courses, and introductory and intermediate courses in drawing; consent of instructor.

STUDIO ART: OTHER

ARTS 161. BEGINNING PHOTOGRAPHY
Basic techniques of black and white photography, camera operation, film development, printing, and presentation. Students are expected to own or have easy access to a manually adjustable 35mm camera.

ARTS 288. VISUAL ARTISTS: PERSONAL ACCOUNTS
Personal accounts by art faculty and visiting artists of their contemporaneous visual art production and the background and context these artists work with. The "artists of the evening" will show their own work and others present ing a scope of practice, including painting, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, photography, and design, among others.

ARTS 491. PRACTICUM IN COLLEGE TEACHING
                                                                      variable credit
Independent study by means of teaching a particular course in art. Various assignments closely directed by instructor, including development of syllabi and other course materials, construction and reading of examinations lecturing and/or discussion leadership, laboratory supervision, academic counseling of students. May be repeated for total of no more than eight credits. Credit may not be earned in conjunction with course in which student is concurrently enrolled. Does not satisfy major or all-college requirements. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and department. P/F only.

ARTS 495. STUDIO INTERNSHIPS
Provides credit-bearing work experience related to student's current studio work and future professional goals. Students work with campus or outside sponsoring agencies; projects may take the form of advertising, poster or graphics design, illustration and design for publications, or any type of studio-related work that complements the student's academic and career interests. (Can be repeated.) Prerequisites: advanced standing and permission of instructor.

ARTS 496. SEMINAR IN STUDIO ART
                                                                             1 credit
Individual seminars may include participation, visiting artists lectures, workshops, demonstrations, exhibition openings, field trips, written and oral presentations, museum visits, and portfolio preparation. Open to BFA majors only.

ARTS 499. SENIOR EXHIBITION SEMINAR HONORS
The Senior Exhibition Seminar, required of all BFA degree candidates, consists of faculty-student seminars covering exhibition preparation, publicity, portfolio presentation, current exhibition opportunities, the candidate's exhibition and critique. Prerequisites: senior standing and BFA faculty approval.

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Studio Art: Graduate Courses

ARTS 511-597 are primarily for students with a BA degree in art and/or those with accumulated graduate credit in studio work earned elsewhere. Graduate students in art history may take studio courses, but they are not credited toward MA or PhD in art history. Under no circumstances can students be admitted to these courses without presenting portfolio of work and obtaining consent of departmental chair.

ARTS 511. 2-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN
For advanced students with prior design experience. Applied graphic communication problems; book, symbol, layout, typography, photoreproduction methods.

ARTS 531. SCULPTURE
Problems conceptualized independently; developed in plastics, wood, stone, or metal.

ARTS 541. PAINTING
Practical and theoretical problems directed toward individual development of substantial project in painting.

ARTS 551. PRINTMAKING
Advanced work, with independently selected problems in printmaking, etching, lithography, or woodcut.

ARTS 571. DRAWING
Concept and process problems in drawing. Individual development of complex related ideas through substantial series of drawings.

ARTS 591. TEACHING PRACTICUM
                   See ARTS 491.

ARTS 597. INDEPENDENT WORK
Independent studio work in sculpture, painting, printmaking, drawing, or two-dimensional design.

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