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Greek

(see also Greek Studies page)

ELEMENTARY GREEK I (GRK 101)

Ancient Greek grammar, vocabulary at the elementary level. Reading of simple texts, including actual quotations from ancient authors. Ancient Greek civilization topics to go along with readings. Translation from Greek into English. For majors and non-majors.

ELEMENTARY GREEK II (GRK 102)

2nd of 2 semesters of Ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary for developing reading skills in ancient Greek. Reading of simple texts, including actual quotations from ancient authors. Ancient Greek civilization topics to go along with readings. Translation from Greek into English. For majors and non-majors.

READINGS IN GREEK LITERATURE I, OR, WHAT IS A CLASSIC (GRK 203) (.pdf, 358kb)

Read in Greek and in translation Longus' "classic" novel, Daphnis and Chloe. Consider the question, What is a classic?, in relation to D&C and more generally: the cultural resonance of classics through the ages. Review of grammar. Reading, translation (oral, written) and analysis of texts; translation-commentary project; oral report. Regular attendance and preparation indispensable. For majors and non-majors. Students who successfully complete this course will be eligible for a partial reimbursement of tuition. For details, see http://bingweb.binghamton.edu/~grk101/syllabus.htm#tuition_incentive, "tuition incentive."

HEROES - HOMER'S ODYSSEY (advanced ancient Greek, GRK 381) (.pdf, 123kb)

In this advanced ancient Greek course, we shall explore the concept of the hero in Homer's epic of mythic return: the Odyssey. While first and foremost a class in ancient Greek poetry studied in the original language, "Heroes-Homer's Odyssey" will maintain a consistent focus on the theme of heroism. What is a hero/heroine? How does the Odyssey gender the heroism of its protagonists? How has the question been approached in the past? What have we to add to that? We shall read the entire Odyssey in translation, though we shall mostly work on translating and comprehending the original Greek. Format: Topical readings; daily translation, discussion, quizzing; occasional student reports, including a short project on Homer, heroism, myth, and art; midterm; final exam. Full-time students who successfully complete the course will qualify for a generous award under provisions of the Levin Fund tuition incentive program. For details, visit: http://bingweb.binghamton.edu/~grk102/syllabus.htm#tuition_incentive.

SEX AND THE CITY: LYSIAS' ORATORY

SEX, VIOLENCE, JEALOUSY, DOMESTIC ARCHITECTURE - all that and more will come under scrutiny as we study two courtroom speeches from Greek antiquity: Lysias' On the Murder of Eratosthenes (outraged husband slays wife's lover) and his Against Simon on a Charge of Battery (rival lovers brawl over boy). Both speeches delve into the messier side of love in fourth-century BCE Athens. Both have a lot to say about classical Athenian society, law, and rhetoric: how seduction counted as worse than rape, how separation of the sexes mattered a great deal, how affluent Athenians facing court dates could care enough about rhetorical self-presentation to hire pricy consultants like Lysias. Exploration of classical Athenian courtroom rhetoric, the legal and social background. Reading-discussion of ancillary texts in English translation (PDFs posted to Blackboard). Exercises in grammar, morphology, composition. Frequent quizzing, no exams. Occasional brief oral reports. Realistic, student-directed mock Athenian homicide trial.

INDEPENDENT STUDY (GRK 397) (.pdf, 347kb)

Designed by consultation between instructor and student. FALL 2010: "Introduction to Attic Tragedy: Euripides' Medea." Course will involve an in-depth consideration of fifth-century BCE tragedy as genre, as social-political mirror (issues of gender and ethnicity in particular), as philosophical reflection, with a focus on Euripides' Medea as both typical and atypical of the genre. Study of the language, meter, style, and thought of tragedy. Discussion, translation, quizzing, oral presentation, short paper. See syllabus.

Last Updated: 3/12/15