Greek Courses

ELEMENTARY ANCIENT GREEK I (GRK 101)
First semester of Ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary.  Reading of simple texts, including actual quotations from ancient authors. Ancient Greek civilization topics to go along with readings. Translation from Greek into English.

ELEMENTARY ANCIENT GREEK II (GRK 102)
Second of two semesters of Ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary for developing reading skills in ancient Greek. Reading of simple texts, including actual quotations from ancient authors. Ancient Greek civilization topics to go along with readings. Translation from Greek into English.

INTERMEDIATE ANCIENT GREEK (GRK 203)
Read in Greek and in translation Longus' "classic" novel, Daphnis and Chloe. Consider the question, What is a classic?, in relation to D&C and more generally: the cultural resonance of classics through the ages. Review of grammar. Reading, translation (oral, written) and analysis of texts; translation-commentary project; oral report. Regular attendance and preparation indispensable. For majors and non-majors. Students who successfully complete this course will be eligible for a partial reimbursement of tuition. For details, see http://bingweb.binghamton.edu/~grk101/syllabus.htm#tuition_incentive, "tuition incentive."

SEX AND THE CITY: LYSIAS' ORATORY (GRK 381A)
Sex, Violence, Jealousy, Domestic Architecture - all that and more will come under scrutiny as we study two courtroom speeches from Greek antiquity: Lysias' On the Murder of Eratosthenes (outraged husband slays wife's lover) and his Against Simon on a Charge of Battery (rival lovers brawl over boy). Both speeches delve into the messier side of love in fourth-century BCE Athens. Both have a lot to say about classical Athenian society, law, and rhetoric: how seduction counted as worse than rape, how separation of the sexes mattered a great deal, how affluent Athenians facing court dates could care enough about rhetorical self-presentation to hire pricy consultants like Lysias. Exploration of classical Athenian courtroom rhetoric, the legal and social background. Reading-discussion of ancillary texts in English translation (PDFs posted to Blackboard). Exercises in grammar, morphology, composition. Frequent quizzing, no exams. Occasional brief oral reports. Realistic, student-directed mock Athenian homicide trial.

IRREVERENT EURIPIDES (GRK 381E) - Spring 2016
In this course we will read selections from several plays by the fifth-century Athenian playwright Euripides. Euripides is often considered the most personal of the Athenian tragic poets, and he may also have been the most irreverent, his works at times bordering on comedy. Bacchae explores the rewards and dangers of ecstatic religion in conflict with the ruling power. Hippolytus explores the folly of human pride and of misogyny as its title character attempts to remain apart from the forces of nature that propagated the Greek world of thought. Alcestis explores heroism, family obligations, and the necessity of death.

INDEPENDENT STUDY (GRK 397 & 497)
Designed in consultation with Instructor

Last Updated: 10/30/15