Greek Courses

ELEMENTARY ANCIENT GREEK I (GRK 101)
First semester of Ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary.  Reading of simple texts, including actual quotations from ancient authors. Ancient Greek civilization topics to go along with readings. Translation from Greek into English.

ELEMENTARY ANCIENT GREEK II (GRK 102)
Second of two semesters of Ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary for developing reading skills in ancient Greek. Reading of simple texts, including actual quotations from ancient authors. Ancient Greek civilization topics to go along with readings. Translation from Greek into English.

INTERMEDIATE ANCIENT GREEK (GRK 203)
Review and continuation of grammar, then a selection of ancient Greek literature read in the original with special attention to literary and cultural exploration. Reading, translation (oral, written) and analysis of texts; occasional oral reports; quizzing. Regular attendance and preparation indispensable. For majors and non-majors.

DESTROYER OF ARMIES: ARISTOPHANES' LYSISTRATA (GRK 380A)
This semester we will experience one of the most fascinating and original comedies to survive from ancient times: Aristophanes’ Lysistrata. Here, the title character and her band of bold women, sick of years of war, stage a sex-strike forcing the men to accept peace. Yet this play is no mere sex farce. Posing serious questions about sexual politics, gender equality, and social dialogue, this play puts the conventional wisdom of its time and place to the test.

HISTORIANS ON BARBARITY (GRK 380B)
In this advanced reading course in ancient Greek, we will concentrate on images, conceptions and constructions of Persians and Mediziing, the term Hellenes coined to describe those Greeks who sympathized and cooperated politically with the Greek arch-enemy. We will read significant numbers of passages in Greek and even more in translation from Herodotos and Xenophon, and fewer from Thukydides. 

HEROES - HOMER'S ODYSSEY (GRK 381)
In this advanced ancient Greek course, we shall explore the concept of the hero in Homer's epic of mythic return: the Odyssey. While first and foremost a class in ancient Greek poetry studied in the original language, "Heroes-Homer's Odyssey" will maintain a consistent focus on the theme of heroism. What is a hero/heroine? How does the Odyssey gender the heroism of its protagonists? How has the question been approached in the past?

SEX AND THE CITY: LYSIAS' ORATORY (GRK 381A)
Sex, Violence, Jealousy, Domestic Architecture - all that and more will come under scrutiny as we study two courtroom speeches from Greek antiquity: Lysias' On the Murder of Eratosthenes (outraged husband slays wife's lover) and his Against Simon on a Charge of Battery (rival lovers brawl over boy). Both speeches delve into the messier side of love in fourth-century BCE Athens.

IRREVERENT EURIPIDES (GRK 381E)
In this course we will read selections from several plays by the fifth-century Athenian playwright Euripides. Euripides is often considered the most personal of the Athenian tragic poets, and he may also have been the most irreverent, his works at times bordering on comedy. Bacchae explores the rewards and dangers of ecstatic religion in conflict with the ruling power. Hippolytus explores the folly of human pride and of misogyny as its title character attempts to remain apart from the forces of nature that propagated the Greek world of thought. Alcestis explores heroism, family obligations, and the necessity of death.

Last Updated: 4/25/16