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Spring 2008 Curriculum

The Translation Research and Instruction Program (TRIP) curriculum provides courses needed by 1) the undergraduate translation studies minor, 2) the graduate Certificate in Translation which may be taken as a separate rack or combined with any degree program, and 3) the PhD in Translation Studies. The requirements of these three options are available on the TRIP website (http://trip.binghamton.edu). The indispensable courses are listed in the Core Curriculum ; the valuable auxiliary courses, in the Coordinated Curriculum . Departmental and School websites provide information for courses in the Coordinated Curriculum.

CORE CURRICULUM | COORDINATED CURRICULUM

CORE CURRICULUM

The workshops (listed below), which frequently meet together, are practice-oriented. They provide experience in texts indicated by the subtitle. Both require fluency in the source language, effective expression in English, and advanced research skills. This is the course in which students can see whether they like translating.

PRACTICE

TRIP 572. TRANSLATION WORKSHOP: LITERARY. In this workshop students strive to produce a publishable literary text. The precise schedule and format will depend on the talents and interests of the students enrolled.

TR 11:40-1:05. Carrol F. Coates, professor of French and Comparative Literature; staff. (Also taught as TRIP 472, CoLi 472, CoLi 572, FREN 572, SPAN 582, LACS 480A, PIC 612B.)

TRIP 573. TRANSLATION WORKSHOP: NON-LITERARY. In this Workshop students work on texts from areas where translation is mandatory. The precise format will depend on the interests of the students enrolled.

TR 11:40-1:05. Carrol F. Coates, professor of French and Comparative Literature; staff. (Also taught as TRIP 473, CoLi 473, CoLi 573, FREN 573,FREN 473, LACS 480B, PIC 612C).

TRIP 580C.INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER-ASSISTED TRANSLATION. Highly recommended for students planning a career in translation. The techniques learned are not language-specific.

M 1:10-4:10. Carrol F. Coates, professor of French and Comparative Literature; staff. (Also taught as TRIP 461, Coli 580C, LACS 580C, Ling. 449B, PIC 612D).

THEORY

TRIP 580T. TEACHING DECONSTRUCTIVELY. PEDAGOGY AND THEORY.

W 1:10-4:10. Rosemary Arrojo, professor of Comparative Literature. (Also taught as CoLi 535P).

TRANSLATION AND LITERATURE

TRIP 580L. Joyce, Ulysses . Close reading of the greatest 20th-century Western novel with an English-language matrix.

M 1:10-4:10. Marilyn Gaddis Rose, distinguished service professor, Comparative Literature. (Also taught as CoLi 541J, PIC 606M).

TRIP 580M. Louis XIV and Molière. A multi-media approach to the French "Golden Age." Conducted in French with English allowed for oral and written participation by students outside Romance Languages.

TR 2:50-4:15. Carrol F. Coates, professor of French and Comparative Literature. (Also taught as

FREN 481H,FREN 581H, MDVL 481D).

TRIP 580P. Argentina : Translation and Politics. This "reading" of Argentina will allow actual translation projects.

W 4:40-7:40. Brett Levinson, professor of Comparative Literature.

SERVICE COURSE

TRIP 707. Foreign Language Proficiency. These sections are restricted to graduate students who need foreign languages for research purposes. Currently sections are scheduled for French and Spanish.

TBA 1. credit hour. P/F only.

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COORDINATED CURRICULUM

In these courses it is advisable to get the instructor's permission.

Graduate School of Education

EDUC 529. Rhetorical Grammar. M 1:10-3:40. C. Beth Burch, professor of Education.

ELED 513. Language Acquisition and Instruction in Second Language Learning.

W 4:40-7:10. Holly Hansen-Thomas, assistant professor of Education.

Harpur School of Arts and Sciences

ENG 562D. Reflections on Poetics and Politics.

TR 1:15-2:40. David Bartine, associate professor of English.

ENG 572R. Introduction to Theory and Criticism.

TR 1:15-2:40. Praseeda Gopinath, assistant professor of English.

ENG 589G. Rhetoric and Composition. Theory and Practice.

MW 3:30-4:55. Kelly A. Kinney, assistant professor of English.

HIST 560A. Gender and Colonialism.

R 7:00-10:00. Elisa Camiscioli, assistant professor of History.

ITAL 563D Six Authors in Search of a Character

TR 10:05-11:30. Rosemarie LaValva, Professor of Italian

ITAL 563E Versi di amori e di gloria

TR 1:15-2:40. Rosemarie LaValva, Professor of Italian

PHIL 543B. Socrates.

TR 8:30-10:00. Anthony Preus, professor of Philosophy. (Also taught as PHIL 403A).

PHIL 605. Narrative Ethics.

T 6:00-9:00. Anna Gotlib, assistant professor of Philosophy.

PIC 550U. Foucault's Voices.

T 4:24-7:25. Stephen David Ross, distinguished professor of PIC and Comparative Literature. (Also taught as PHIL 655B, PHIL 460Q, CoLi541D).

PIC 604G. The World as Image.

W 3:30-6:30. Stephen David Ross, distinguished professor of PIC and Comparative Literature. (Also taught as ARTH504B, CoLi608E, PHIL580J, PHIL604G).

SPAN562A. Renaissance and the Baroque. Conducted in Spanish.

TR 1:15-2:40. Thomas A. O'Connor, distinguished professor of Spanish. (Also taught as SPAN461, MDVL461, MDVL581D, CoLi512L).

SPAN581D. Latin American Colonial Literature. Conducted in Spanish.

TR 4:35-5:50. Thomas A. O'Connor, distinguished professor of Spanish. (Also taught as LACS483L, LACS581D, Coli535L).

SOC690A. Globalism, Modernism, Post Modernity.

W 1:10-4:10. Martin Murray, professor of Sociology

MGMT500. Management Information Systems. Jinyoul Lee, assistant professor of Management. Sec. 01

MW 2:50-4:15; Sec. 02 MW 4:25-5:50.

MGMT530. Global and Ethical Environment (2 credits). Thomas F. Kelly. Sec. 01 T 11:40-1:05; Sec. 02 R 11:40-1:05.-

SSIE500. Computational Tools.-

TR 10:05-11:30. Vilem Vychodil, assistant professor of Systems Science and Industrial Engineering.

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Last Updated: 8/21/14