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Course Descriptions

Descriptions of all courses offered by the Graduate School of Education are provided below. All courses are 4 credits, unless noted otherwise. While course prefixes often are associated with programs, most programs allow or require courses from other areas. Each prefix here is linked to corresponding courses below.

EDUC: Education

EDUC: Education 600+

ELED: Elementary (Childhood) Education

ERED: Early Childhood Education

LTRC: Literacy Education

SEC: Secondary (Adolescence) Education

SPED: Special Education

EDUC: Education

EDUC 406. Teaching, Learning and Schooling

This course will introduce students to the school as a social institution and to issues pertaining to teaching, learning, and schooling. Students who take this course should have a strong interest in the field of Education. The course will explore the relationship between culture, teaching, and learning; how students and teachers (and other school personnel) experience schooling; the structure and social purposes of schooling; and ideas and issues related to school reform. Some field experience will be required in local elementary/secondary schools. This course meets NO requirements for either the School of Education nor New York State teacher certification. This course is for a letter grade and cannot be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.

EDUC 408. The History of Education

What are schools for? What should they do? Throughout American history, parents, teachers, and policy-makers have answered these questions in different ways.  This course explores the ways education has changed over the centuries, from early colonial apprenticeship to twenty-first century homeschooling.  Central themes will be the emergence of the public school, the cycles of reform, and the relationships between class, race, and schooling.  Students will read primary sources and secondary sources to uncover the changing historical patterns of education in American politics, society, and culture.


EDUC 410. Issues in Education

Issues and challenges in public education. Topics include role of education; political and cultural structure of schooling; public schools as human service delivery systems; historical perspectives on current practices; and new developments in education.

EDUC 420. Teaching and Learning in a Diverse World

This course is based on the socio-cultural perspective that meaningful learning occurs in the active interaction between minds and the environment, which is the integration of multiple aspects such as history, culture, politics, technique, and human resource. Students who take this course should have a strong interest in Education. Students can expect to understand basic assumptions and underlying principles of different theories of teaching and learning, explore intricate relationships between culture, cognition, and learning, deepen thinking about variables that promote meaningful and active teaching and learning, broaden consideration for diverse learning needs of individual students, critically analyze conventional practices in teaching and learning, and improve personal learning experiences by implementing relevant concepts and theories. This course does not meet any requirements in the School of Education. EDUC 420X does not count for New York State teacher certification.

EDUC 430. Adolescent Psychology and Education (also listed as EDUC 530)

This course is designed to introduce students to the major theories of adolescent psychological, social, and cognitive development and engage students in applying these theories to understanding adolescent issues and behaviors. Students will become aware of the critical issues and problems associated with adolescence in current times, and of the ways "adolescence" is socially constructed. Students will explore the diversity of adolescent identities, the varied pathways to identity development, and ways educators can help to provide safe spaces for identity development/exploration. A variety of strategies for meeting the social and academic needs of adolescent learners in educational settings will be discussed. Fieldwork may be required.

EDUC 445. Basic Educational Statistics

Education Statistics will provide the student with a basic understanding of statistical use in education to assess interventions, effectiveness of programs, analyze group difference on achievement tests, and other education uses. Topics include descriptive statistics; counting methods; probability with emphasis on standardized distributions, correlations, and non-parametric procedures commonly used in education.  Inferential statistics will be introduced including t-distributions; hypothesis testing and linear regression. Technology will include the use of statistical software and will be introduced through workshops.

EDUC 480. Special Topics in Education

EDUC 480X. Social Problems of Adolescence

This course is designed to introduce students to adolescent psychological, social, and cognitive development and engage students in applying these theories to understanding adolescent problems. Students will become aware of the critical issues and problems associated with adolescence in current times, and of the ways "adolescence" is socially constructed. A variety of strategies for meeting the social and academic needs of adolescent learners with problems will be discussed. Fieldwork may be required.

EDUC 483. Second Language Acquisition (also listed as EDUC 583)

This introductory course examines theories and research in first and second language acquisition in order to develop an understanding of the way in which second and/or foreign languages are acquired. This course explores linguistic, cognitive, psychological, affective, sociolinguistic, and sociocultural foundations of second language (L2) development. The student will read about a variety of issues in Second Language Acquisition (SLA) research.

EDUC 492. Education Minor Internship

The internship portion of the Education Minor is designed to be a hands-on learning experience for those interested in working in the field of Education. Students involved in the minor are given the opportunity to gain professional experience and learn more than what is just traditionally taught in a textbook. Through this opportunity students gain a deeper understanding about the education field through a practical approach, while at the same time learning about themselves and putting into practice their personal skills as future educators. The internship and supplementary seminar will allow students to explore potential career choices and prepare for exposure to the education field post-graduation. Students gain the most from the experience through field-work, a weekly seminar, and collaboration with a supervisor for the development of the internship. Students are responsible for locating and applying to the internship site, and are encouraged to reference the Education Minor website for a list of site suggestions. Students are not limited to opportunities suggested by the department, but all internships must be pre-approved. The application process includes a cover letter, student proposal letter, letter of recommendation, and a statement of agreement with the chosen internship site. The internship is only open to Juniors or Seniors. Prerequisites include completion of either Education 406 or Education 410. The course is designed to be 4 credits.

EDUC 497. Independent Study (variable credit)

Registration by permission of advisor only.

EDUC 501. Crucial Issues in Education

Interdisciplinary framework for the study of educational problems. Analysis of current issues, uncovering their historical, sociological, policy, and political foundations. Topics will vary, but typically special attention paid to school reform, educational inequalities, and the politics of the curriculum.

EDUC 504. Multiculturalism and the Practice of Schooling (also listed as EDUC 440X)

This course will guide students in exploring and examining multicultural education through historical, sociological, and philosophical foundations as they relate to race, ethnicity, culture, religion, ability, gender, sexuality and overall diversity. The course will emphasize the role of multiculturalism and cultural competency in pedagogy. The course will focus on the significance of multicultural curricula in the critical development and enhancement of an equitable, democratic nation. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

EDUC 507. Issues in U.S. History before 1877 (also listed as HIST 530A)

This is one of two central content courses for students earning a Graduate Certificate in the Teaching of American History. The course offers exposure to selected interpretive issues in U.S. history prior to 1877 within a framework that permits students to focus on ways to introduce these issues into the secondary school classroom. Readings will permit students to examine alternative interpretations of events and processes in U.S. History and to work extensively with primary sources that underpin those interpretations.

Our discussions of course material will be supplemented by computing technologies. Class meetings are in a room equipped for wireless access, and laptop computers will be provided for student use during class time. A significant portion of class time will be used for collaborative analysis and evaluation of internet-based collections of primary documents, with a special emphasis on integrating such documents into secondary school history education. Notes: Students should have a solid background in U.S. History before registering. EDUC 508/530B is the second half of this two-course sequence.

EDUC 508. Issues in U.S. History 1877- Present (also listed as HIST 530B)

This is one of two central content courses for students earning a Graduate Certificate in the Teaching of U.S. History. Exposure to selected interpretive issues in U.S. history after 1877 within a framework that permits students to focus on ways to introduce these issues into the secondary school classroom. Examination of alternative interpretations of events and processes in U.S. history, working with primary sources that underpin those interpretations.

EDUC 529. Rhetorical Grammar  (also listed as EDUC 680L)

Rethinking of English grammar from primarily a structural perspective. How words, phrases, clauses, sentences are formed; rhetorical implications of grammatical choices; wide range of grammatical forms and structures; work with figures in a study of style. Lecture/lab format. Common-sense, lively approach to grammar designed to solidify students' experiences with grammar and renew confidence in writing and speaking. Especially useful for students in a writing-intensive discipline or in English education.

EDUC 530. Adolescent Psychology and Education (also listed as EDUC 430)

This course is designed to introduce students to the major theories of adolescent psychological, social, and cognitive development and engage students in applying these theories to understanding adolescent issues and behaviors. Students will become aware of the critical issues and problems associated with adolescence in current times, and of the ways "adolescence" is socially constructed. Students will explore the diversity of adolescent identities, the varied pathways to identity development, and ways educators can help to provide safe spaces for identity development/exploration. A variety of strategies for meeting the social and academic needs of adolescent learners in educational settings will be discussed. Fieldwork may be required.

EDUC 531. Teaching American Ethnic Literature

This course for those who wish to teach American ethnic literatures provides an opportunity to read, discuss, write and consider the implications and complications of teaching literature from the various traditions of European American literature, African American literature, Asian American literature, Native American literature, and Latin American literature. Course content is split between male and female writers; pedagogical and curricular issues of teaching ethnic literature are addressed.

EDUC 541. Applied Research Techniques

Issues in education research. Development of critical skills as consumers of research. Analysis of different types of qualitative and quantitative research, including case studies, ethnography, critical theory, causal-comparative, quasi-experimental, and experimental. Issues of credibility, criteria, and portraiture; and validity, quality of design, analysis of differences, and descriptive statistics. Historical research also considered.

EDUC 559. Fundamentals of Second/Foreign Language Education

This class addresses second and foreign language teaching pedagogy and methodology. Students will explore the social, historical, and cultural elements that define second and foreign language teaching and will gain an understanding of various approaches, principles, and practices used. This course is designed for teachers of both second and foreign languages.

EDUC 583. Second Language Acquisition (also listed as EDUC 483)

This introductory course examines theories and research in first and second language acquisition in order to develop an understanding of the way in which second and/or foreign languages are acquired. This course explores linguistic, cognitive, psychological, affective, sociolinguistic, and sociocultural foundations of second language (L2) development. The student will read about a variety of issues in Second Language Acquisition (SLA) research.

EDUC 599. Research Credit (1-9 credits)

Research and independent work on an approved project or problem. Registration by permission of adviser only. Graded S/U.

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EDUC 600+

Note: These courses are for Educational Leadership and Doctoral Education, and available only by consent of the instructor.

EDUC 601. Contemporary Philosophical and Social Issues in Education

Examination of philosophical assumptions that inform educational practice and policy. Exploration of important relationships, including the connections between educational theory and practice, knowledge and human interests, democracy and education, and diversity and community. Theorizing is made meaningful to practitioners as they analyze contemporary educational issues not only through the writings of distinguished philosophers and social theorists, but also through their own critical frameworks.

EDUC 602. Curriculum Theories, Designs and Evaluation

Examination of curriculum as a field of study. Primary focus on alternative theories and implications for content and form of curriculum. Issues relating to purposes, selection, organization, differentiation and evaluation of curriculum. Exploration of current practice in curriculum with reference to issues of diversity and equity, conceptions of literacy and the work of teachers and administrators.

EDUC 603. Theories of Learning and Instructional Design

Exploration of the psychological and epistemological foundations of curriculum and instruction, relationship between learning and cognitive development, role of historical and conceptual analysis in the design of school subjects. Students are expected to apply learning theory to instructional design and pedagogical practice.

EDUC 604. Integrative Doctoral Seminar on Reflective Practice

Exploration of students' own philosophies of education in relation to their own fields of study and research interests. Students address broad questions related to the political and social contexts for teaching and learning, ways of knowing and teaching, curriculum problems and ethical considerations.

EDUC 605: Creative Problem Solving in Educational/ Organizational Settings

This class explores and exploits affective teaching methods in the introduction, understanding, and discovery of principles and patterns of complex learning systems. These systems involve individuals observing, discovering, learning, and creating as individuals and as members of much larger adaptive organizations. Concepts will be demonstrated by way of a series of challenging heuristic problems as well as a number of lively, extended-class simulations. Topics include: metaphor as a primary tool in creativity, finding order out of chaos, planning, organizing and managing for discovery, encouraging the flash of insight, making strong use of weak information, developing synergy within working/learning groups, discovering organizational strengths, weaknesses, and opportunities via metaphor.

EDUC 606. Curriculum Leadership

Exploration of standards-based and alternative approaches to developing, organizing, implementing, supervising, and evaluating PreK-12 curricula. Emphasis on interactions among curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

EDUC 607. Education Law and Ethics

Overview of legal principles governing PreK-12 schools and districts. Constitutional and decisional law, statute, and regulations. Emphasis on ethical leadership that promotes equity and justice.

EDUC 608. School Finance and Business Operations

Concepts and tools needed to understand, manage, and improve school business operations, budgeting, and resources. Leaders' fiscal responsibilities are situated in the context of state and federal education finance systems.

EDUC 609. Assessment for Student Learning & School Improvement

Examination of multiple purposes for, and means of assessing student learning. Emphasis on implications for the support of diverse learners. Analysis and interpretation of student data for instructional, program, and school improvement.

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EDUC 620. The Research Process in Education

Exploration of multiple approaches to educational research. Examination of the nature and quality of descriptive and causal research studies, and qualitative and quantitative research techniques. Analysis of educational policies and practices using ethnographic, critical theory, sociological, experimental, and historical research. Introduction to meta-analysis. This course will be offered every fall semester.

EDUC 621. Seminar on Quantitative Research

Development of students' quantitative research skills, especially in exploratory data analysis, graphing, presentation of evidence, and multiple regression. Examination of diverse methods and designs, e.g., observational, survey, correlational, and experimental research. Application of techniques to current educational issues; understanding the role data play in research and policy-making. Emphasis on real-world data and student projects. Prerequisite: EDUC 620.

EDUC 622. Seminar on Qualitative Research

Examination of qualitative approaches to and criteria for problem posing, research design, data collection, theory construction, interpretation and evaluation. Analysis of a range of theoretical constructs (such as constructivism, phenomenology, critical theory). Effects on styles of qualitative research, such as case studies, descriptive research, evaluation research, ethnography and action/participatory research. Prerequisite: EDUC 620.

EDUC 623. Philosophical Foundations of Educational and Social Research

Consideration of various philosophical foundations of educational and social research, including post-modernism, feminism, positivism and critical theory. Focus on analysis of the attributes of various forms of knowledge, particularly the ways of deriving and validating knowledge, and how the conduct of educational and social research is influenced by differing philosophical foundations.

EDUC 670. Theories of Human Development

Concepts of human development based on various schools of psychological thought (e.g. psychoanalytic, cognitive, developmental and behavioral). Exploration of their contextual world views. Affective, social and moral development aspects, as well as impact of race, class and gender.

EDUC 671. Research in Multicultural Education

Examination of the methodologies, designs, theories, knowledge and issues emerging from research that has cultural and multicultural concerns. Primary focus on educational research; related research in other fields of inquiry (e.g. sociology and anthropology) that concern schooling and education as broadly conceived. Exploration of nature of diversity and education that is multicultural, with linkage to aspects of educational practice.

EDUC 672. Processes of Supervision and Staff Development

Exploration of literature on: adult learners and the impact of race, gender and class on them; nature of practical knowledge; supervision and staff development as educative processes. Exploration of professional development through an analyzed sequence of face-to-face conferences and group sessions.

EDUC 673. Leadership in Educational Settings

Emphasis on the role of educators as instructional innovators and change-agents within complex educational organizations. Focus on nature and implementation of educational leadership. Students are involved in the development and analysis of leadership strategies to effect systems change.

EDUC 674. Literacy in School and Society

Examination of current issues in literacy (verbal, visual and technological). Overview of current literacy theory; literacy and literacy instruction in a socio-historical context. Functional literacy, aesthetic literacy, aliteracy, illiteracy, cross-cultural literacy patterns. Students critique current literacy practices, programs research and policy within and beyond schools. Emphasis on political and multicultural realities of schools and literacies that are valued (or devalued) in educational theory and practice. Connections among social, historical, philosophical and psychological foundations of literacy as they deconstruct current practice. Course includes a collaborative research project.

EDUC 675. Planning and Policy Development in Education

Examination of the demographic, political and social contexts of planning and policy making. Students are expected to identify and examine in depth one or more planning and policy issues by using the techniques, methods and disciplinary constructs of their academic or professional fields.

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EDUC 676. Special Education and School Reform

Examination and critical review of current professional literature and practices in special education. Policy and planning initiatives are considered, emphasizing closer alignments with regular education.

EDUC 677. Seminar and Practicum in Writing

Exploration of theory, research and practice related to the writing process and the educator as writer. Study of the writer's craft, including issues of voice, audience, critical analysis and revision, conventions and style, editing, peer review and collaborations are a major focus. Participants select their own educational topics or issues, and have intensive practice in writing workshop and experience in writing for professional publication. You are expected to write and submit two articles for publication, and a conference proposal.

EDUC 678.Foundations of Democratic Education

Exploration and analysis of foundations of education for democracy. Emphasis on examination of theoretical and philosophical rationales for democratic curriculum and pedagogy in schools. Critical analysis of current educational policies and practices with reference to democratic principles. Focus includes in-depth examination of John Dewey's work on democracy and democratic education.

EDUC 680. Special Topics in Education (2-4 credits)

Various topics in education, offered according to interest and need. Students examine research and other professional literature related to the topic and present research/position papers for critical discussion and response

EDUC 691. Teaching Practicum (1-4 credits)

May not be applied toward credit for degree. Registration by consent of student's adviser and program coordinator.

EDUC 692. Internship (variable credit)

Students engage in a practicum in a professional education setting. Drawing on doctoral coursework and previous professional experiences, the internship emphasizes problem solving in the schools or other educational settings. Registration requires written proposal approved in advance by instructor and student's adviser.

EDUC 697. Independent Study (1-4 credits)

Written proposal approved in advance by the instructor and student's adviser.

EDUC 698. Pre-dissertation Research (1-9 credits/semester)

Independent reading and/or research in preparation for comprehensive examination for admission to EdD candidacy, and/or preparation of dissertation prospectus. May not be applied toward course credits for degree. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

EDUC 699. Dissertation (1-9 credits/semester)

Research and preparation of the dissertation. Prerequisite: formal admission to state of candidate for EdD degree. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

EDUC 700. Continuous Registration (1 credit/semester)

Required of inactive students who wish to maintain matriculated status. No credit toward degree requirements.

EDUC 707. Research Skills (1-4 credits)

Development of research skills required for graduate study. May not be applied to course credits for any graduate degree. Prerequisite: approval of relevant graduate program director or department chair and student's adviser.

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ELED: Elementary (Childhood) Education

ELED 480A. Integrating Music and Arts into the Elementary Classroom

Activity –oriented course promoting an understanding of the arts in the total growth and development of children. This class involves hands-on experiences in art, music, drama and dance. Various methods of arts integration will be introduced to enrich curriculum and provide meaningful learning experiences for students. A perfect class for those interested in becoming elementary teachers or who work in summer camps or programs for children. 

ELED 502. Child Growth and Development (also SPED 502)

Cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development of children from birth to age 12. Impact of poverty, racism, gender and social class on child growth and development. Roles of the teacher and the schools embedded in societal context. Course project will involve a child study based on direct interaction with a child and family. Fieldwork required weekly or according to a schedule established by the instructor.

ELED 503. Curriculum and Teaching in the Elementary Grades

Exploration of processes of curriculum design, development and evaluation through students' own theorizing and that of classic and contemporary educational theorists. Analysis of connections between and among children, teaching, curriculum and school structure. Problematic relationship between knowledge and power. Pedagogical and curricular issues central to multiculturalism, particularly those posed by the effects of racism, sexism, classism and ableism. Fieldwork required weekly or according to a schedule established by the instructor.

ELED 507. Elementary School Science: Content, Methods and Research

Focus on the science content, instructional strategies, resources, activities, New York state core curricula guidelines and underlying theoretical basis for teaching science to children ages 5 to 12. Emphasis on participatory activities that use inexpensive, household-type materials leading to an understanding of how key science concepts apply in everyday life. Students are expected to alternate between the roles of student and teacher by both thinking about and doing science and science teaching. In addition to specific cognitive and skills outcomes, this course seeks to create an increased interest in and appreciation for science. Fieldwork required weekly or according to a schedule established by the instructor.

ELED 510. Elementary Social Studies Curriculum

Current nature of social studies education and possible ways of improving social studies curriculum and teaching in the elementary education grades. Topics include scope and sequence; facts, concepts, skills and values in social studies instruction; unit planning and student projects; community study; and teaching for social concern, social criticism and social action. Examination of New York state K-6 social studies curriculum.

ELED 540. Elementary School Mathematics: Content and Methods

Focus on mathematics content and instructional pedagogy. Strategies for teaching elementary school mathematics; use of manipulatives; problem solving; integration of conceptual understanding and procedural competence. Fieldwork required weekly or according to a schedule established by the instructor.

ELED 580. Special Topics in Elementary/Childhood Education

Specific topics vary from semester to semester. Attention may focus on social, psychological, historical, political or contemporary issues. In-depth exploration of the impact of various topics on current public- and private-school practices.

ELED 580A.  Integrating Music and the Arts into the Elementary Classroom

Activity-oriented course promoting an understanding of the importance of the arts to the total growth and development of children. Suggested methods of integrating art, music, drama, dance experiences to enrich and reinforce the curriculum. Direct experiences with a variety of art materials in order to better guide children in their own art activities.

ELED 590. Pre-Service Practicum

Students teach 5 days per week for a full semester (following the local BOCES calendar) in an approved setting (grades 1-6). Prerequisites: completion of 24 credit hours in education courses and consent of the adviser and course instructor. Open to matriculated students only. Graded S/U only.

ELED 597. Independent Study (1-4 credits)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ELED 700. Continuous Registration (1 credit/semester)

Required of inactive students who wish to maintain matriculated status. No credit toward degree requirements.

ELED 707. Research Skills  (1-4 credits)

Development of research skills required for graduate study. May not be applied to course credits for any graduate degree. Prerequisites: approval of relevant graduate program director or department chair.

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ERED: Early Childhood Education

ERED 501. Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Young Children (6 credits)

Examination of developmentally appropriate practices in early childhood education (birth to grade 2) through a framework of theory and practice in motor , cognitive, social-emotional, language, emergent literacy and adaptive behavior development. Focus on the learning, development and behavior of young children with diverse abilities and needs, including disabilities. Open only to students matriculated in the pre-service programs in Childhood and Early Childhood Education. Must also be enrolled in ERED 590 Practicum in Early Childhood Education. Offered only during the Summer Session.

ERED 504. Developing Programs for Young Children with Disabilities (also listed as SPED 504)

Examination of past and current thinking in the field of early childhood education special education (birth to grade 2) through an early intervention framework. Includes analysis of connections between theory and practice with a focus on observing, evaluating, instructing, and assessing young children with disabilities. Fieldwork required weekly or according to a schedule established by the instructor. 

ERED 506. Early Language and Emergent Literacy (also listed as SPED 506, LTRC 506)

Examines language development and delays from infancy through early childhood, including relationships between receptive and expressive language (e.g., oral, sign), and between language development and emergency of literacy (from awareness of and interest in print to reading and writing). Strategies to strengthen early language and emergent literacy in preparation for K-12 education. 

ERED 590. Practicum in Early Childhood Education (2 credits)

Five week practicum in agencies serving preschool children with diverse abilities and needs, to plan and implement developmentally appropriate practice. Open only to students matriculated in the pre-service programs in Childhood and Early Childhood Education. Must also be enrolled in ERED 501 – Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Young Children. This course is taught in the summer.

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LTRC: Literacy Education

LTRC 415. Foundations of Literacy Learning and Instruction

This course provides an overview of current literacy theory, research, and practices in literacy learning and instruction for students in grades K-12. Topics include theories of reading/ literacy processes, reading and writing connections, literacy curricula, methods of instruction, standards, and assessments, content area literacy, new literacies of information and communicative technology (ICT), and cultural diversity.

LTRC 417. Introduction to Children's Literature

This course provides a broad introduction to literature written for young readers (kindergarten - middle school).  Students will learn to select and analyze texts representing a variety of genres using a literary perspective.  Students will demonstrate the ability to think critically about diversity issues including gender, reace, ethnicity, and social class in picture books and chapter books for children.

LTRC 506. Early Language and Emergent Literacy (see ERED 506)

LTRC 513. Language and Literacy Instruction for English Language Learners in K-12 Classrooms

This class focuses on the principles of second language acquisition and its application for elementary, middle, and high school teachers to effectively teach English language learners (ELLs) in K-12 classrooms. Instructional strategies that are adapted to promote the language and literacy development of ELLs will be highlighted. Students may complete assignments at grade levels related to their certifications. 5 hours of fieldwork are required for this course.

LTRC 515: Current Research, Theory, and Practices in Literacy Instruction

This course provides an overview of current literacy theory, research, and practices in the elementary, middle, and secondary schools. Topics include theories of reading process/literacy, reading and writing connections, reading programs and methods of instruction, standards and assessments, content area literacy, diversity, and the new literacies of information and communicative technology (ICT). Students will design and conduct an inquiry-based project.

LTRC 516: Writing Instruction and Literacy for the Content Areas

This course provides an overview of current literacy research, theory, and practices in writing. The focus is on writing instruction and integration of language and learning with the content areas and literature. Teachers develop their competence in literacy pedagogy by designing an integrated unit of study for a group of diverse learners and implementing this unit in a classroom setting when possible. Fieldwork required weekly or according to a schedule established by the instructor.

LTRC 517. Culturally Diverse Literature for Children and Adolescents

This course provides an overview of all genres of literature written for K-12 students with a focus on cultural diversity. Offered for classroom teachers, reading teachers, and special education teachers who wish to 1) develop an aesthetic and critical response to literature, 2) increase competence in selecting and evaluating quality literature, 3) increase knowledge of children's literature as a resource for teaching and learning, and 4) connect children's literature with the electronic literacies of information and communication technology. Fieldwork required weekly or according to a schedule established by the instructor.

LTRC 518. Literacy Assessment and Teaching (also listed as SPED 507)

This course develops competence in administering, analyzing, and critiquing both formal and informal literacy assessments, and using this information to provide appropriate instruction to struggling learners. It is offered for classroom teachers, reading teachers, and special education teachers. During the first hour teachers tutor children in grades 2-5 with a focus on developing reading comprehension, vocabulary, and writing skills through targeted assessment. Each teacher prepares a case report on a child and a portfolio of classroom assessment and teaching tools.  Fieldwork required weekly or according to a schedule established by the instructor.

LTRC 519: Adolescent Learners and Literacy for the Content Areas

This course is designed to assist content area teachers in developing a full picture of adolescent literacy and understanding the literacy demands of content area courses. Teachers will learn about theoretical models of adolescent development and the role of literacy in learning in the 21st century. Teachers will study classroom practices that help diverse students connect new information to prior knowledge, use knowledge of vocabulary and  text structure to support comprehension, use writing to deepen understanding of and communication about their content, and use multiple forms of literacy to enhance learning.  Teachers will design and prepare materials to use in their own subject area. Field work is required as per the syllabus.

LTRC 520. Seminar in Word Analysis, Spelling and Writing

This course assists content area teachers, reading teachers, and special education teachers in developing a full understanding of the scope of stage-model spelling and writing development. Teachers will know how to assess spelling, evaluate student development, and provide instruction based on spelling stages using student-facilitated inquiry-based word sorts. Teachers create a hands-on unit of study for one spelling stage. Fieldwork: none.

LTRC 521. Literacy Assessment and Instruction for Secondary Students (also listed as SPED 527)

This course will develop competence in administering, analyzing, and critiquing both formal and informal literacy assessments, and using this information to provide appropriate one-on-one and small group instruction to striving secondary students. University students in the course will be paired with striving secondary students from the local community (e.g., involved with the Windsor HS Liberty Partnership) to conduct literacy assessments that inform the development of reading comprehension, vocabulary, and writing strategies via project-based learning. The course will also incorporate the use of technology to collect and analyze data, develop reports, and facilitate instruction. This course is divided into two halves: the first half is for coursework and the second half is dedicated to working directly with Windsor HS students.

LTRC 580. Special Topics in Literacy Education

Specific topics vary from semester to semester. Attention may focus on social, psychological, historical, political or contemporary issues. Exploration in depth of the impact of various topics on current public and private school practices.

LTRC 580A Comprehension and Metacognition

This course is designed to assist K-12 literacy, content area, and special education teachers in developing an understanding of reading comprehension strategies and metacognition.  Students will learn the importance of effective teaching that engages readers in monitoring their understanding of what they read.  Teachers will learn how to help readers think critically and effectively and develop a deep understanding of texts through modeling and lesson development.

LTRC 592: Practicum & Seminar in Literacy Leadership

A supervised field experience (in a B-6 or 5-12 setting) and seminar provide teachers with practice, demonstration, self-evaluation and validation of competencies gained in the literacy program. The field experience includes work with a cooperating reading specialist in an area school. The seminar provides 1) opportunity for planning, feedback, and evaluation with input from peers and faculty, b) opportunity to develop skills and strategies for the consulting role with parents, teachers, and other school and community personnel. Prerequisites: Matriculation in the Literacy Education program, all required courses for literacy certification, and consent of the instructor. Graded S/U only. Fieldwork: 120 hrs. minimum.

LTRC 593: Practicum & Seminar in Literacy Leadership (2 credits)

A supervised field experience in a B-6 or 5-12 setting provides practice, demonstration, self-evaluation, and validation of competencies gained in the literacy program. Opportunities to: 1) provide literacy assessment and instruction for K-12 students with literacy difficulties, 2) work collaboratively with other professionals, and 3) act as a resource and consultant for a school literacy program. Prerequisites: Completion of Literacy Education program and consent of adviser. Open only to students who already have B-6 or 5-12 Literacy certification and would like an additional level. Fieldwork: 50 hrs. minimum.

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SEC: Secondary (Adolescence) Education

SEC 500. Foundations of Secondary Education

Exploration of historical, political, economic and social contexts in which secondary schools exist. Experiences of teachers and students in these cultural settings. Issues of curriculum and equity. Critical reflective practice is encouraged by an emphasis on linking course readings and discussions with students' experiences in field settings.

SEC 501. Foundations of Special Education for Content Area Teachers

Introduces content-area teachers for grades 7-12 to current legal, social, theoretical, and research foundations for special education services and practice. One role of general educators at the secondary level is to effectively teach students with high-incidence disabilities in inclusive environments. This involves understanding students' individual learning differences and collaborating with special educators and support staff to adapt assessment and instruction, to use positive behavioral supports, and to use research-based practices to meet the requirements of Individualized Education Program plans. Fifteen hours of fieldwork with students with disabilities in schools is required.

SEC 502. English as a Second Language for Content Area Teachers (2 credits)

Specifically provides secondary-level content-area teachers with the necessary skills and understandings to effectively teach second-language learners in an mainstream environment. This class includes a survey of culture, context and teaching methods for teaching the culturally and linguistically diverse student. Includes an introduction to Sheltered Instruction, or Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE).

SEC 580. Special Topics in Secondary Education

Specific topics vary from semester to semester. Attention may focus on social, psychological, historical, political or contemporary issues. Exploration in depth of the impact of various topics on current public and private school practices.

SEC 590. Pre-service Practicum in Teaching-I

Master of arts in teaching students engage in teaching internships in an area schools, grades 7-9. Approximately half the hours for the internship will be spent in this setting during the public schools' fall semester (September to December). Prerequisites: Successful completion of SEC 593 with a grade of B or better, and acceptable performance in field experience (100 hours in local schools is required). Open to matriculated students only. Graded S/U only.

SEC 591. Pre-Service Practicum in Teaching II

Master of arts in teaching students engage in teaching internships in an area schools, grades 10-12. Approximately half the hours for the internship will be spent in this setting during the public schools' fall semester (September to December).  Prerequisites: Successful completion of SEC 593 with a grade of B or better, and acceptable performance in field experience (100 hours in local schools is required). Open to matriculated students only. Graded S/U only.

SEC 592. Final Integrative Study

MSEd/adolescence education majors will take this adviser-guided, independent study in their final semester. It will integrate and update general and discipline-specific pedagogy courses in the form of a final project, portfolio or thesis. Graded S/U only.

SEC 593. Philosophical and Theoretical Foundations in the Pedagogy of English, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, or Romance Languages (French or Spanish)

Practices and theories of current research and methodology in teaching of content areas. Minimum of 65 hours of fieldwork required. Successful completion of SEC 593 with a grade of B or better and acceptable performance in field experience is required for student teaching and continued progress in the MAT program. Open only to matriculated MAT students.

SEC 594. Curriculum and Teaching in English, Social Studies, Mathematics or Science

This course extends and applies the content of SEC 593 to specific curricular and instructional issues relevant to the student teaching experience of SEC 590 and 591, Practica in Teaching. Must be taken concurrently with SEC 590 and 591.  A grade of B or better must be earned in SEC 594, and an overall average of B or better must be obtained to graduate. Open only to students matriculated in the MAT program. Prerequisite: SEC 593.

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SPED: Special Education

SPED 411. Introduction to Special Education (see SPED 501)

SPED 500. Foundations of Special Education for Content Area Teachers

Introduces content-area teachers for grades 7-12 to current legal, social, theoretical, and research foundations for special education services and practice. One role of general educators at the secondary level is to effectively teach students with high-incidence disabilities in inclusive environments. This involves understanding students' individual learning differences and collaborating with special educators and support staff to adapt assessment and instruction, to use positive behavioral supports, and to use research-based practices to meet the requirements of Individualized Education Program plans. Fifteen hours of fieldwork with students with disabilities in schools is required.

SPED 501. Introduction to Special Education (also listed as SPED 411)

Overview of current concepts and issues in special education. Content includes the theoretical, historical, legal, and social foundations, as well as etiology, characteristics, needs, educational strategies, technologies, assessment, and support services for individuals with disabilities. A full range of types and severity of disabilities will be addressed.

SPED 502. Child Growth and Development (see ELED 502)

SPED 504. Developing Programs for Young Children with Disabilities (see ERED 504)

SPED 506. Early Language and Emergent Literacy (see ERED 506; also listed as LTRC 506)

SPED 507: Literacy Assessment and Teaching (see LTRC 518)

SPED 509. Teaching Students with Developmental Disabilities in Inclusive Settings

Theories and strategies of teaching students with substantial cognitive, physical, and/or sensory disabilities that require interventions beyond academic remediation. Strategies for teaching sensorimotor, communication, and other basic skills; incorporating instruction into general education curriculum routines; using high, low, and mid-tech equipment and materials. Fieldwork required with student with multiple disabilities. Prerequisite: completion of 3 semesters of pre-service curriculum in Childhood, Early Childhood, and Special Education or permission of instructor. Offered only during the Winter Session.

SPED 510. Autism Spectrum Disorders

With the incidence of Autism Spectrum Disorders growing steadily (now nearly 1 out of 100 children), all teachers are likely to have students with this disability. Many teachers find it challenging to meet the diverse behavioral and educational needs of this population, particularly in inclusive settings. This course strengthens the relationship between theory and practice in working with individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders, providing a historical overview and theoretical framework for current understandings of Autism Spectrum Disorders, and emphasizing practical strategies for use in school and community settings.

SPED 521. Proactive Approaches to Behavior Management

Framework for understanding and influencing challenging behavior of students and promoting development of positive social interaction skills. Fieldwork required weekly or according to a schedule established by the instructor.

SPED 522. Collaboration with Families and Staff

Knowledge, skill and dispositions needed by teachers to develop partnerships with families of children with disabilities and/or families from diverse social, cultural and linguistic traditions; with other school personnel; and with staff in related community agencies. Fieldwork required weekly or according to a schedule established by the instructor. Prerequisites: SPED 501 or consent of instructor.

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SPED 523. Assessment in Special Education

Provides participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to collect and use a wide range of assessment data in general education and special education settings. Prepares educators who engage in reflective decision-making and research-validated professional practice based on collection and evaluation of informal, formal, curriculum-based, and standardized assessment data. Open only to matriculated students in special education. Fieldwork required weekly or according to a schedule established by the instructor. Prerequisite: SPED 501 or equivalent.

SPED 526. Instruction and Assessment for Adolescence Special Education

Addresses the special learning needs of secondary students with high incidence disabilities. Emphasis is on lesson and unit planning, instructional delivery, and use of effective instructional and assessment strategies. Participants will critically examine, evaluate, and apply approaches used in both general and special education settings for teaching English/language arts, math, science and social studies. Fieldwork required weekly or according to a schedule established by the instructor.

SPED 527.  Literacy Assessment and Instruction for Secondary Students (see LTRC 521)

SPED 528. Special Education Technology

Explores practical issues in using technology to support or supplement instruction for students with disabilities, including assistive technology and instructional technology. The course is grounded in principles of universal design for learning and IDEA mandates for Assistive Technology. Fieldwork required weekly or according to a schedule established by the instructor. Prerequisites: SPED 501; access to and competence with personal computer for email, word processing, and web searches.

SPED 529. Instructional Methods/Strategies for Teaching Diverse Learners

Although IDEA and NY State regulations provide supportive policy frameworks for inclusion, many teachers struggle to actualize these commitments. This course is designed to assist pre-service teachers to select and use instructional methods and strategies that are effective for diverse learners. Fieldwork required weekly or according to a schedule established by the instructor. Prerequisites: SPED 501; matriculation in pre-service program in Childhood & Early Childhood Education.

SPED 541. Instructional Approaches for Inclusive Elementary Classrooms

Although IDEA and NY State regulations provide supportive policy frameworks for inclusion, many teachers struggle to actualize these commitments. This course is designed to examine and reverse barriers to inclusion embedded in school cultures and assist elementary level teachers in developing instructional approaches that address the educational, cognitive, social and emotional needs of ALL children. Fieldwork required weekly or according to a schedule established by the instructor. Prerequisite: SPED 501, or permission of instructor.

SPED 564. Educating Students with Severe Disabilities in Inclusive Settings

Rationale and strategies for meaningful assessment and instruction of students with severe multiple disabilities, in regular academic, special area and non-academic classes and settings, through a team approach to planning and instruction. Fieldwork required weekly or according to a schedule established by the instructor, with a student with severe multiple disabilities. Prerequisites: SPED 501, and SPED 526 or SPED 541, or equivalent.

SPED 565. Personality and Behavior Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence

SPED 565 is a topical graduate course designed to examine a range of methodological and theoretical issues related to the education of children and youth with emotional and behavioral disorders. Sessions are devoted to understanding variance in child and adolescent development, school failure and drop out, and discipline. Prevention of emotional/behavioral disorders, the impact of inclusion on children with diverse behavioral and learning needs, professional development and advocacy are also addressed.

SPED 580. Special Topics in Special Education

Specific topics vary from semester to semester. Attention may focus on social, psychological, historical, political or contemporary issues. Exploration in depth of the impact of various topics on current public and private school practices.

SPED 590: Pre-service Practicum and Seminar in Childhood Special Education

Students teach 5 days per week for a full semester in an approved setting (grades 1-6) with special education teachers  as Cooperating Teachers. The seminar accompanying the practicum is designed to help students apply and refine the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed by teachers in inclusive elementary schools. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of ELED 590 and at least 24 credits in Special Education. Graded S/U only.

SPED 595. In-service Practicum and Seminar in Special Education

Students teach 5 days per week for a full semester in an approved setting (B-2, 1-6 or 7-12), with supervision from the special education faculty. The seminar accompanying the practicum is designed to help students apply and refine the knowledge, skills, and dispositions for working effectively in a variety of settings serving students with disabilities. Prerequisites: matriculation in the special education program and completion of at least 24 hours of coursework in Special Education; waiving the 24 credit requirement will be considered only by written petition to the program. Graded S/U only.

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Last Updated: 3/20/14