Active Alert: Classes canceled rest of today and tomorrow

B-ALERT:Due to forecast, all classes effective 4:30pm today Nov 25 are canceled. There will be no classes Wednesday Nov 26. Adjust travel plans accordingly.

Alert updated: Tuesday, November 25, 2014 3:50 PM

Rifa'at Abou-El-HajDale Tomich

Professor
Ph.D., Princeton University Modern Near East, Europe
Office: LT 308
Phone: (607) 777-6480
E-mail: dtomich@binghamton.edu

Curriculum Vitae (doc, 114kb)


Research interests focus on world historical change. He is particularly concerned with the historical sociology of Latin America and the Caribbean as part of the historical formation of the modern world economy. His current research is a comparative study of slavery in Brazil, Cuba, and the United States during the nineteenth century. It seeks to understand the ways that systems of slavery and forced labor expanded and were transformed in response to the industrialization of the world economy. Recent books include: Through the Prism of Slavery: Exploration in Labor, Markets, and World Economy. Professor Tomich offers courses on historical sociology, global inequalities, and social theory.

With a group of international scholars he is engaged in a collaborative interdisciplinary research project on the relation of function and representation in the making of plantation spaces in Brazil Cuba and the Lower Mississippi Valley.

Recent courses:

  • Foundations of Social Theory

Recent Publications:

  • The Second Slavery: Global Process and Local Histories in the Remaking the American Plantation Periphery, 1815-1888. (In progress.)
  • Image and Industry: Technology, Nature, and Labor in the Nineteenth Century Cuban Sugar Frontier. (In progress.)
  • “Clues, Landscape, and the Meaning of Place: Microhistory and Representation of the Cuban Sugar Frontier, 1820-1860,” in Event, Place, and Narrative Craft: Method and Meaning in Microhistory, edited by James F. Brooks, Christopher DeCorse, and John Walton. Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA: School of American Research Press, (forthcoming).
  • "Pensando lo impensable: Victor Schoelcher y la revolucion haitiana," Revista Del Caribe (Santiago de Cuba) 45 (Abril, 2005), 16-23.
  • "Atlantic History and World Economy: Concepts and Constructions," Protosociology, 20 (2004), 102-121.
  • “Vitorino Magalhaes Godinho: Atlantic History, World History,” Review XXVIII, 4 (2005), 305-312.
  • “Portugal and the Making of the Atlantic World: Sugar Fleets and Gold Fleets, the Seventeenth to the Eighteenth Centuries,” Review XXVIII, 4 (2005), 313-337. Translation of Vitorino Magalhaes Godinho, “Le Portugal et la Construction du Monde Atlantique: Les flottes du sucre et les flottes de l’or. XVIIe-XVIIIe siecles,” Annales, V, 1 (janvier-mai 1950), 32-36 and V, 2 (avril-juin, 1950), 184-197.
  • Historia Atlantica.Special issue of Estudos AfroAsiaticos (Rio de Janeiro). Co-edited with Flavio dos Santos Gomes. August, 2005.
  • Through the Prism of Slavery: Labor, Capital, and the World Economy. (Boulder, CO: Rowman and Littlefield, 2004).
  • “Material Progress and Industrial Architecture: Innovation on the Cuban Sugar Frontier, 1818-1857.” In Nature, Raw Materials, and Political Economy. Edited by Paul Ciccantell, Gay Seidman, and David Smith.) (JAI/Elsevier.)
  • “The Wealth of Empire: Francisco Arrangoy Parreno, Political Economy, and the Second Slavery in Cuba.” Comparative Studies in Society and History. Vol. 45, no. 1 (January 2003); 4-28.
  • “Slavery in Martinique and the French Caribbean.” In Caribbean Slavery in the Atlantic World. Edited by Verene A. Shepherd and Hilary McD. Beckles. (Princeton: Markus Wiener, 2000).
Through the Prism of Slavery

Last Updated: 11/19/14