Michael O. WestMichael O. West

Professor
Ph.D., Princeton University Modern Near East, Europe
Office: LT 415
Phone: (607) 777-2260
E-mail: mwest@binghamton.edu

Curriculum Vitae (doc, 89kb)


Current research focuses on the interconnections and inter-relationships between the liberatory struggles of African peoples worldwide. This is an outgrowth of his previous research, which centered on class formation in southern Africa, black transatlantic connections, and the emergence of African studies. His publications include The Rise of an African Middle Class: Colonial Zimbabwe, 1898-1965 and (with William G. Martin) Out of One, Many Africas: Reconstructing the Study and Meaning of Africa.

Recent courses:

  • Black Nationalism in the U.S.
  • The Black International

Recent Publications

  • Global Africa: The Emergence and Evolution of an Idea,” Review, 28, 1 (2005): 85-108.
  • “Seeds are Sown: The Garvey Movement in Zimbabwe in the Interwar Years,” International Journal of African Historical Studies, 35, 2-3 (2003): 335-362.
  • The Rise of an African Middle Class: Colonial Zimbabwe, 1890-1965 (authored), Indiana University Press, 2002.
  • “Ethiopianism and Colonialism: The African Orthodox Church in Zimbabwe, 1928-1934.” In Christian Missionaries and the State in the Third World, edited by Holger Bernt Hansen and Michael Twaddle. Oxford: James Currey and Athens: Ohio University Press, 2002: 237-254.
  • “Going to America: The Odyssey of Stephen Sithole, an African Evangelical Christian, 1938-53,” Journal of African Travel-Writing, 8/9 (2001); 136-150.
  • “Franchise or Nothing: Zimbabwean Black Elite Responses to Imperial Ideologies of Democracy.” In The Historical Dimensions of Democracy and Human Rights in Zimbabwe, Volume One: Pre-Colonial and Colonial Legacies, edited by Ngwabi Bhebe and Terence Ranger. Harare: University of Zimbabwe Publications, 2001: 84-98.
  • Out of One, Many Africas: Reconstructing the Study and Meaning of Africa (edited with William G. Martin), University of Illinois Press, 1999.
  • “Like A River: The Million Man March and the Black Nationalist Tradition in the United States,” Journal of Historical Sociology, 12, 1 (1999): 81-100.
The Formation of the Modern State Modern Devletin Dogasi

Last Updated: 11/19/14