Active Alert: Classes canceled rest of today and tomorrow

B-ALERT:Due to forecast, all classes effective 4:30pm today Nov 25 are canceled. There will be no classes Wednesday Nov 26. Adjust travel plans accordingly.

Alert updated: Tuesday, November 25, 2014 3:50 PM

Wendy L. WallWendy L. Wall

Associate Professor
Ph.D., Stanford University Twentieth-Century United States
Office: LT 713
Phone: (607) 777-2382
E-mail: wwall@binghamton.edu


I am an historian of the twentieth-century U.S. with an abiding interest in the nation’s political culture and the construction of American identity, broadly defined. (My teaching interests also include the history of the American West from pre-Columbian times to the present.) I am particularly interested in the way that “Americanism” has been delineated by those in power and by the way that traditionally marginalized or excluded groups have resisted, deployed, adapted to, or changed such definitions. Since many factors influence political culture—and issues relating to identity are played out in diverse arenas—my work crosses the traditional categorical boundaries into which U.S. historians are generally corralled. My published work has drawn on and spoken to scholars in the fields of political, intellectual, cultural, ethnic, religious, racial, gender, economic, and diplomatic history. My book Inventing the “American Way”: The Politics of Consensus from the New Deal to the Civil Rights Movement <http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/subject/HistoryAmerican/Since1945/?view=usa&amp;ci=9780195329100> argues that America’s postwar “consensus” can best be understood, not as a social fact, but as a political project—a project rooted in the turbulent decade that preceded U.S. entry into World War II. Beginning with this premise, the book traces the diverse and competing efforts of various groups to shape a consensus on national values between the mid-1930s and the mid-1950s. I am currently working on two book projects: a history of the Immigration Act of 1965, and a study of the promotion, uses and permutations of civil religion from Franklin Delano Roosevelt to Ronald Reagan.

Significant Publications

Inventing the “American Way”: The Politics of Consensus from the New Deal to the Civil Rights Movement (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008; paperback, 2009).

  • Co-winner of the Organization of American Historians’ 2008 Ellis Hawley Prize
  • Phi Alpha Theta Best First Book Award, 2008
  • CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title, 2009
  • Semi-finalist, Harry S. Truman Book Award, 2010

Selected Grants and Fellowships:

  • Colgate Faculty Development Council, major grant recipient, 2006-2007
  • Colgate Research Council, Hearst Fellow and major grant recipient, 2003-2004
  • Colgate Faculty Development Council, major grant recipient, 2002-2003
  • Harry S. Truman Library Institute Research Grant, 2001
  • Rockefeller Archive Center Research Grant, 2000
  • Gilder Lehrman Fellowship, Columbia University Rare Book and Manuscript Collection, 2000
  • Boston University Institute on Race and Social Division, Research Associate, 1999-2000
  • National Endowment for the Humanities Dissertation Fellowship, 1993-1994
  • American Association of University Women Dissertation Fellowship, 1993-1994 (Declined)
  • Grant-in-aid, Hagley Museum and Library, 1994
  • Clarke Chambers Travel Fellowship, Social Welfare History Archives, University of Minnesota, 1993
Inventing the "American Way"

Last Updated: 11/19/14