Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Note: Unless otherwise noted, all undergraduate courses carry four (4) credits.

Note: The following course descriptions, while indicating the nature and scope of the CCPA undergraduate programs, are not a historical record. Most courses carry four (4) semester hours of credit and meet one or two times per week. In the following lists, credit hours other than four (4) are noted following the course title.

HDEV 200. INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

This course is designed to provide students with an overview and understanding of the study of human development based on relevant theoretical approaches used in this area. In this course, students will explore a range of topics including: the study of human development; cross cultural theory and research; culture and socialization; physical and biological development in fancy and beyond; social emotional development in early development and across the lifespan; cognitive development; language development; personality development; gender development; sexual identity development; racial identity and socialization; culture and mental health; development in family contexts; and development and the future. This course also will engage students in an exploration of global-local contexts in relation to cross-cultural research and theoretical understandings of human development. Within these contexts, the course will provide an emphasis on multicultural conceptual approaches in the study of human development including but not limited to race, gender, social class, and sexuality.

HDEV 300. SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH METHODS

This course will introduce students to research methods used in conducting and reviewing social science research. A specific emphasis will be placed on basic research principles and concepts within the context of quantitative and qualitative methods used in the social sciences. The course will explore a range of topics including epistemology, research, and methods; theoretical models in research; ethics in research; quantitative and qualitative research design, measurement, sampling, and analysis; and multicultural epistemology, theory, and research. This course is intended to prepare human development students to provide critical analyses of social science research. They will learn that the production of research is political and value-laden. Another objective of this course is for students to become able to read and understand research methods provided in scholarly articles and to critically evaluate the value and limitations of published studies, to practice utilizing various research methods to answer questions about the social world, and to support interventions that improve communities. Prerequisite: HDEV 200. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV. This course is not open to sophomore students.
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THEORIES OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (HDEV 301-339)

HDEV 305. CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Integrated study of the bio-cultural, emotional, intellectual, social and psychological themes and growth patterns of children. Emphasis is placed on their implications for child-rearing, social practices and socio-cultural aspects of child development. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 306. ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT

This course will provide an overview of adolescence, including social, cultural and historical contexts for development; physical and cognitive changes within the individual, together with socio-historical and cultural differences in our understanding of adolescence as a transitional period in life. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 309. DEATH, DYING AND BEREAVEMENT

This course examines issues surrounding aging, death, dying and bereavement from a developmental perspective. There is a special emphasis on understanding death in the context of our culture. Topics covered on aging include the physical social and cognitive changes associated with aging. Topics covered on death include suicide, euthanasia, cultural differences in understanding death and rituals surrounding death and dying. Topics covered on bereavement include the grieving process, adaptation, support, and pathological grieving. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 310. CHILD DEVELOPMENT: SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

This course is designed as a follow-up to HDEV 305, Child Development. The theory and research covered in that course will be applied to specific groups of children based upon their social locations, special needs, and/or particular circumstances. These may include, but are not limited to, courses on children of color, children in poverty, gender and childhood, etc. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 311. ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT: SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

This course is designed as a follow-up to HDEV 306, Adolescent Development. The overview of theory and research provided in that class will be applied to specific groups of adolescents and youth based on their social locations, special needs, and/or particular circumstances. These may include, but are not limited to, courses on adolescents at risk, transitional periods (e.g., puberty, leaving for college, etc.), gender and adolescence, adolescent family relations, minority youth issues, youth with disabilities, etc. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 313. EXPLORING QUEER LIVES

Lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender people and others marginalized because of their sexuality and gender expression will be explored through the reading and discussion of theory, research, activist projects, and practice scenarios. Central to this course will be the principle that an adequate understanding of our own and others’ experience of sexuality and gender expression can only be obtained at their intersection with other identities such as race, social class, ethnicity, and disability. This course takes a multi-level approach, exploring these issues within their individual, social and structural contexts. Reading and discussions will extend across disciplinary boundaries and include psychology, anthropology, sociology, history, political science, literary and cultural studies literatures. Goals are to recognize and describe (a) the way in which we come to understand about how sexuality and gender expression affect or should affect our practice in social sciences and (b) the way that minoritizing as well as more universalizing views of sexual injustice differently shape the goals of researchers, activists and practitioners. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 327. CULTURE AND CONTEXT IN DEVELOPMENT

This course will explore perspectives on the impact of culture and context on development. An emphasis will be placed on the role that structural inequalities based on race/ethnicity, gender, social class, and sexuality have on the development. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 330. PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN'S BODIES

Students will gain understanding of the psychological and cultural issues surrounding women's bodies. The course will cover these issues within a developmental framework, beginning with the development of sexual differentiation, development of gender identity and gender role. Issues surrounding puberty and menstruation will be covered next, followed by body image, pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding, health concerns and aging. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 331. MULTICULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY

Examines how behavior and beliefs are influenced and shaped by our experiences and how these experiences are affected by race, religion, ethnicity, social class, disability, gender and sexual identity. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 332. DEVELOPMENT OF ADOLESCENT GIRLS

Students will gain understanding of the many transitions during female adolescence. Course material will focus on multiple developmental domains including physical, cognitive, and social. The course will include the following topics relevant to adolescent female development: puberty, body image, self-esteem, sexual socialization, academic achievement, and relationships. Particular attention will be paid to the impact of the media on the development of adolescent girls. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 335. GENDER, DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATION

This course will examine critical issues related to the influence of gender and development on education. Drawing from diverse societies, in historical and geographical terms, the course will work with a global focus whereby the attempt is to understand the multi-layered power relations framing the teaching-learning of "gender" in formal educational as well as larger cultural contexts. Selected questions include: What implications does gender have for socialization, institutionalized schooling, and lifelong learning? How does gender manifest itself in educational practice, police, and theory in industrialized societies? In what ways have feminisms contributed to an awareness and eradication of inequities, discriminatory practices, and injustice arising from gendered structures, ideologies, and processes underpinning educational and developmental processes? Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 336. BLACK CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT

Surveys Black child and adolescent development with a focus on theoretical aspects of psychological development within African Diasporic contexts. This course will explore how the concept of self contextually is connected to Black psychological development and how Black culture has been instrumental in shaping the lives of Black children and adolescents. Also examines how the intersectionality of race, gender, social class, and sexuality relate to Black child and adolescent development. Topics examined include the complexities of color in Black children’s experience; socio-historical/-political contexts of Black child and adolescent development; parenting, racial socialization, and education for Black children and adolescents; racial attitudes and socialization in children; Caribbean (English-, Spanish-, and French-speaking) youth and education; and legal issues and the criminalization of Black youth. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 337. ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT: LGBTQ YOUTH

Although the social science literatures pertaining to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) identity development, homophobia/heterosexism and LGBTQ health behaviors have grown substantially over the past several decades, adequate representations and information pertaining to LGBTQ adolescent lives continue to be lacking in most adolescent development theories, textbooks and courses. This course will present for discussion the unique challenges faced by these populations, including: issues related to identity development, stigma and prejudice, peer and family conflicts, minority stress, representations in media, a lack of educational resources, and inadequate and inaccurate health education. This course will also explore the physiological, cognitive and emotional changes that occur within LGBTQ youth, the socio-historical and cultural contexts that situate this transitional period in life, and the ways that our understanding of sexual orientation and gender expression affects our practice and responsibilities in the human services professions. The significance of anti-homosexual prejudice toward our understanding of heterosexual adolescent behaviors will also be examined. Central to this course will be the principle that an adequate understanding of our own and others' experience of sexuality and gender expression can only be obtained at their intersection with other identities such as race, class, ethnicity, and disability.
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HDEV 339. BLACK FAMILIES

This course engages students in the study of Black families within the African Diaspora. A special focus will be placed on exploring the socio-historical, -political, and –cultural contexts of Black family life in the African Diaspora. We will critically examine the impact of slavery as well as the intersection of race, gender, sexuality, and social class poverty on Black families; Black families in the White imagination; Black theoretical family frameworks; social construction of Black families in the media; kinship and Black families in urban communities; parenting, fathering, and mother-daughter relationships in Black families; Black families in Black “Queer” Diasporic Frameworks; and Black families, public policy, and advocacy. Some specific topics that will be explored include: the role of skin color and Black family dynamics; Black extended families and kinship networks; informal adoption in Black families; and family secrets in Black families.
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HDEV 348. POLITICS OF EDUCATION

This course will explore critical aspects in the history of education in the US and basic characteristics of educational policy and policy making. A specific emphasis will focus on the socio-economic, -political, and –cultural aspects of education and schooling in the US, the interaction between home, society, and educational institutions, the ways that social inequalities manifest in schools, and the ways that identified emerge through education. A focus will also be placed on understanding contemporary issues in their formulation, implementation and evaluation. Focus on how larger social issues are reflected in the life of schools and how they may be transformed. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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SOCIAL ACTION AND POLICY (HDEV 340-379)

HDEV 352. GENDER, POWER AND DIFFERENCE

Examination of how construct of difference raises important questions about problems faced by most women of color in general vis-a-vis historically existent feminism, both as a political movement and as an academic current. Topics examined include multiple ways of theorizing women's rights and struggles; ideological differences among feminists and women's rights advocates; and issues of race, gender, sexuality and culture within context of reproduction, the family, reproductive rights, feminization of poverty, social services, academic disciplines, language, and discourse. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 365. PSYCHOLOGY OF RACISM

This course will provide students with an understanding of racism within the context of macro- and –micro level inequalities in the US. A specific emphasis will be placed on societal processes from the perspective of four groups (i.e. Asians, Blacks, Latino/as, Native Americans) and will demonstrate how these groups have experienced and have had an impact on key institutional structures of US society (e.g. legal, political, economic, and educational). The intersectionality of race, gender, social class, and sexuality will provide a conceptual framework to explore the role of addressing asymmetrical dynamics of power, powerlessness, authority, privilege, and resistance in contemporary society. Topics examined include the concept of race as a worldview; socio-historical and –political contexts of racism; understanding racism in educational contexts; racism, incarceration, and the Prison-Industrial-Military Complex; and racism and the politics of exclusion (The case of Hurricane Katrina). Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 366. POVERTY AND DISCRIMINATION

This course will provide an examination of economic problems of poverty and racial discrimination. Analysis of public policies such as income maintenance programs, minimum wage legislation, affirmative action, education and housing policies. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 368. SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY

Comprehensive exploration of substance abuse policy in the US will be explored. Topic s explored will include but not be limited to Influences of social, cultural, historical, economic, and political factors that guide policy making and service delivery; and examination of current drug control debate, including legal and illegal drugs. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 369. AMERICAN EDUCATION IN A GLOBALIZED SOCIETY

This course will explore the impact of globalization on American Education Policy and Practice. Students will investigate the issues and problems that American schools face as a result of globalization and how schools have responded to these issues. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 370. POLICY AND SOCIAL WELFARE IN GLOBAL CONTEXT

This course will provide a broad understanding of social policy in the US and globally. Topics will examine from a historical and international perspective the development of social policies on issues including poverty, mental health, employment, and child welfare. This course will facilitate critical and creative thinking about philosophical, political and practical bases of social policy. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 371. AGGRESSION IN CHILDREN AND YOUTH

This course explores maladaptive aggressive behavior in children and youth. It will examine the processes by which children come to rely on hostile, domineering, defensive and oppositional behaviors in their social interactions. Particular attention will be paid to the role that parents and families play in this process, but the course will also examine the social ecology which places families at greater risks. Different developmental trajectories will be studied that affect the stability and discontinuance of aggression and the risk and protective factors that impact upon persistence and desistance of maladaptive behaviors. Aggression in schools and the community will be explored. Ways of preventing and treating aggression will be examined. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 372. HEALTH CARE POLICY

This course will introduce students to the study of healthcare organizations, policies and practices and their connection to individual, family, and community health. Students will explore the distinctive nature of healthcare delivery and healthcare organizations utilizing the theoretical fields of organization theory and behavior. The health policymaking component will enhance the students understanding of the political context of health policy, the tools and strategies for influencing health policy outcomes, and give them the opportunity to analyze health policy issues. The practice component of the course will focus on preparing students to make a contribution to the health of their own communities, as well as other communities, using asset-oriented, collaborative approaches. The focus will be on community building and working with diverse populations. Finally, students will be asked to analyze various ethical situations within healthcare including managerial ethics and leadership, organizational ethics, professional ethics, and biomedical ethics. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 374. PSYCHOLOGY OF HIV AND AIDS

This course will examine psychological aspects of the AIDS epidemic in the United States with a focus on psychological theory and research in this area. Students also will explore the complexities of the AIDS epidemic within the context of the politics of health. A specific emphasis will be placed on a critique of micro- and macro- level processes that influence inequalities in AIDS based on race/ethnicity, gender, social class, and sexualities. Students will engage in critical analysis and thoughtful reflection in exploring and challenging their values, assumptions, perceptions, and biases related to AIDS. Within this context, students will examine the following topics: HIV virology, clinical course, medical treatments, epidemiology, and antibody testing; integrating primary and behavioral health care; assessment issues and strategies; intervention strategies; prevention issues for the mental health provider; HIV, mental health, and prisons; the interface of HIV and substance use; and HIV in the Greater Binghamton area. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 375. JUSTICE AND THE LAW

This course will explore the relationship between the concept and ideals of justice in the American legal system, and their realities. Emphasis will be placed on the ways that justice relates to the Court System, Punishment, The Wars on Drugs and Terror as well as an analysis of the concept of equal justice. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 378. CHILD WELFARE POLICY

This course will provide students with a critical overview of the child welfare system including the legal processes involved with federal and state legislation. A critical emphasis will be placed on how power relations structure organizations and communities within their broader socio-historical, -political, -economic, and –cultural contexts. In this respect, students will engage in critical analysis and thoughtful reflection in exploring and challenging their values, assumptions, perceptions, and biases related to their work as practitioners in communities. Topics that will be explored include but will not be limited to: The Child Welfare System; The Judicial System; Federal Legislation; State Law; The Care and Protection of Children; Adoption; Court Decisions and Client Rights: The Rights of Birth Parents and Foster Parents; Court Decisions and Client Rights: The Rights of Children; Juvenile Delinquency and Child Welfare Reform. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 379. MIGRATION, CITIZENSHIP, AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

The course will examine the lives and experiences of migrant populations especially in relation to discourses of belonging and citizenship from a social justice perspective. A key aspect of the course will be an analysis of local, national, and transnational policies and their implementation strategies. A specific feature of this course is its emphasis on the interconnectedness of global, regional, national, and local realities, as they affect the lives of people in everyday domains. We will analyze, using a range of critical and feminist lenses, how social inequities and disparities have been historically created and maintained within and across geographical contexts. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 391. TEACHING PRACTICUM variable credit

For those students interested in a teaching assistant position for credit. Consent of instructor and department approval is required. May be taken Pass/Fail only. The teaching practicum may be taken for 1-4 credits only. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV
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HDEV 395. INTERNSHIP variable credit

A learning experience integrating theory with practice in a health, human service, community, education, non-profit, government, or business setting. Consent of instructor and departmental approval required. May be taken Pass/Fail only. Internship courses may be taken for 1-4 credits only. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 397. INDEPENDENT STUDY variable credit

Individual research of special topics not offered elsewhere in the curriculum. Demonstrated academic ability and approval of proposed subject are required. Consent of instructor and departmental approval required. Independent study courses may be taken for 1-4 credits only. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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CORE COURSE

HDEV 400. SOCIAL JUSTICE

This course will examine the multi-layered processes that create, perpetuate, and challenge stratification, inequalities, and multiple forms of violence within and across societies. A key intent is to examine conceptions of social justice that underpin efforts to address and redress disproportionalities and disparities resulting from contemporary and historical relations of domination and subjugation. The focus of the course moves between the global context and that of the US, whereby students will analyze their own location within power and wealth structures. A special feature of this course is its emphasis on the interconnectedness of global, regional, national, and local realities, as they affect the lives of people in everyday domains. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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WORKING WITH INDIVIDUALS AND GROUPS (HDEV 401-479)

HDEV 402. YOUTH AND SOCIAL POLICY

This course will provide a critical examination of macro- and micro-level processes that relate to the influence of social policy on youth development. Topics examined include but will not be limited to family, media, and community structures. Focus also will be placed on youth-based organizations and alternative forms of policy formation through the lens of race, class, ethnicity and gender identities. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 420. COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of socio-historical and –political contexts, theoretical principles and modalities, and social values of community mental health systems of care. Students will develop knowledge about current changes and trends in community mental health and attention will be provided to both the micro and macro practice. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 423. MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING

This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop an understanding of multicultural counseling and therapy. The focus of this course is to have students develop their awareness/consciousness, knowledge, and clinical skills in relation to racial/cultural differences as these dynamics have an impact on the therapeutic relationships between mental health practitioners and clients of racially/culturally diverse groups. In particular, students will examine multicultural issues that influence the therapeutic relationship such as racial identity development, cultural worldviews, multicultural competence, and sociopolitical contexts/multicultural ethical considerations in psychotherapy. Students will develop awareness to the dynamics of power and powerlessness that have an impact on the client/mental health practitioner interaction. Students will explore perceptions about their own racial/ethnic/cultural background as well as that of others. This course is appropriate for students interested in working in student affairs and community settings. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 425. MODELS OF ADVOCACY: THEORY & PRACTICE

Social issues such as poverty, victimization, mental illness, disabilities and injustice are often addressed through direct client services. Personnel in the helping professions and education work directly with people affected by social issue in an attempt to bring about individual change that will eliminate or ameliorate the problem. With such an approach, the client is often viewed as having some form of deficit, and professionals are positioned as individuals possessing skills helpful in correcting those deficit. An alternative view conceptualizes social issues not as individual problems but as structural problems embedded within society. Rather than changing the individual, structural change within organizations and communities are needed to address social issues and to promote social justice and civil and human rights. This course will first examine the problems with individualistic and deficit orientations to social issues and consider the problematic power differentials that arise between professional and client roles. The course will then consider how diminished status and marginalization may give rise and sustain social issues such as poverty, victimization, mental illness, disabilities and injustice. Having established the basis or need for an alternative approach-social advocacy-the class will proceed to explore different models of advocacy including advocacy for individual clients, shifting power from service providers to clients, community change, and policy advocacy. As such, the course will consider interpersonal advocacy, service innovation, system change and social action as forms of advocacy. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 435. PROSEMINAR IN CIVIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP

This course will familiarize students with the many economic facets of Greater Binghamton and match student leaders with community leaders from business, political and cultural sectors. A specific emphasis will be placed on an examination of the role of both students and mid-sized universities in community and economic development, based on forecasts of the factors that will be necessary to create thriving communities in the 21st century.
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HDEV 440. PRINCIPLES OF CASEWORK

This class focuses on the conceptual, theoretical, and practical foundations for providing case management services to individuals in various population groups that are being served by a wide array of human service organizations, as well as other service sectors of our society. The course entails such topics as historical developments of case management, model approaches to case management, federal and state policies that impact case management practices, case management interventions, strengths-based case management, interdisciplinary teams and case management, emerging trends impacting effective case management service delivery, and typical activities of case managers. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 442. GROUP COUNSELING

This course will introduce students to the principles and theories of group practice, ethical issues in group counseling, stages of group counseling, group leadership, specialty groups, multicultural issues in group work, and group counseling with special populations. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and experience and begin the application of this learning to various kinds of groups and work settings. Emphases will be placed on principles of group counseling and the development of group membership and leadership skills by participation in group exercises. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 444. ADMINISTRATION OF PUBLIC SERVICE AGENCIES

This course will provide an overview of responsibilities in administering the public agency, as well as an In-depth examination of the many aspects of public agency administration and leadership, client-centered approaches in fulfilling administrative duties, and development of the practitioner’s philosophy and style of administration and leadership. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 445. COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP AND DEVELOPMENT

This course will examine community development theory and practice; community development problems, history, actors; models of interventions and range of such interventions, including housing development and community economic development; issues of who defines community development agendas; relationships between physical and non-physical development, and examination of selected recent trends and emerging policy issues. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 447. CONFLICT RESOLUTION

This course will explore conflict analysis, management, and resolution; branch of social science committed to the search for and perfection of alternative dispute resolution methods; explanation of why conflicts occur at every level, from the personal to the global; and comparisons and contrasts of competing explanatory paradigms. Other areas of focus will include the role of conflict resolution advocates in teaching certain practices that are non-violent and non-coercive and are considered effective in building solid and satisfactory personal and group relationships; reflection on the root causes of conflict (including issues of race, social class, and gender); and development of conflict resolution skills and practices. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 450. CASEWORK: SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

This course is designed as a follow-up to HDEV 440, Principles of Case Management. The overview of theory, research, and practice provided in that class will be applied to specific groups of people based on types of services and/or needs. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 451. CLINICAL ASSESSMENT

The focus of the course is to help the student develop an understanding of the principles of diagnostic procedures and processes; the use of the DSM for learning signs and symptoms of behaviors associated with mental illness; the application of other diagnostic instruments for determining needed interventions for treating a variety of human needs; diagnostic instrument construction; uses and misuses of these resources; tests available and used in clinical practice; and the philosophical, theoretical, and ethical considerations applicable to testing and diagnostic procedures and practices. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 454. DYNAMICS OF CHANGE IN CLIENT-CENTERED ORGANIZATIONS

This course introduces students to the challenges of leadership in the human services. The course will assist students preparing for the helping professions in becoming knowledgeable and comfortable with the idea that human service workers of today and tomorrow must be capable of readying their organizations for constant change. As future leaders in the human services, students will become familiar with the forces and trends of change that affect the field and learn through the comparative study of leadership theory and local initiatives how they might successfully guide the profession through the transitions that lie ahead. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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CORE COURSE

HDEV 475. PRACTICUM IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

This course will provide students with opportunities to engage in the integration and application of theory and practice through a practicum. Students will explore the pragmatic, nuts-and-bolts type issues of the practicum experience to a more in-depth exploration with concerns such as hierarchical relationships in service-delivery contexts, the implications of social justice, and the long-term as well as everyday workings of agencies. Building on a critical approach to work in the field of human development, a critical emphasis will be placed on how power relations structure organizations and communities within their broader socio-historical, -political, -economic, and -cultural contexts. As such, students will examine the implications of social identities and positionality in relation to race/ethnicity, gender, social class, and sexuality for experiences in the field as interns and eventually as human development practitioners. During this process, students will engage in critical analysis and thoughtful reflection in exploring and challenging their values, assumptions, perceptions, and biases related to their work as practitioners in communities. This course is only open to students with senior standing. Prerequisites: HDEV 200 and HDEV 300.
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HDEV 495. INTERNSHIP variable credit

A learning experience integrating theory with practice in a health, human service, community, education, non-profit, government, or business setting. Faculty sponsor and departmental approval is required. Consent of instructor and departmental approval required. May be taken Pass/Fail only. Internship courses may be taken for 1-4 credits only. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.Back to Top

HDEV 497. INDEPENDENT STUDY variable credit

Individual research of special topics not offered elsewhere in the curriculum. Demonstrated academic ability and approval of proposed subject are required. Consent of instructor and departmental approval required. Independent study courses may be taken for 1-4 credits only. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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Last Updated: 10/5/13