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Course Offerings

As always, check BUonline for the latest updates and the Harpur Bulletin for course descriptions and details.

Download the JUST Academic Planning Chart here

 SPRING 2015 

CORE COURSES

 

JUST 244

HIST 244

 

14029

15557

Dina Danon

Modern Jewish History

 T/R

2:50 – 4:15

 

FA 342

JUST 344       

HIST 381K   

MDVL 380O  

26178

26179

26220

Gina Glasman

Renaissance and Early Modern Jewish History

“H” “W”

 T/R

10:05 – 11:30

 

FA 245

JUST 363

HIST 380G

27836

18544

Jonathan Karp

“Jews & Christians in Conflict”

M

6:00 – 9:00

 

 

RC 259

 

ELECTIVE COURSES

  

JUST 211

 

27709

Randy Friedman

“Early Zionist Thought”

T/R

11:40 – 1:05

 

 

FA 342

JUST 257     (25)  

HIST 285C

28085

28142

Dina Danon

Jews and Muslims

T/R

1:15 – 2:40

 

 

FA 244

JUST 284B    

 

 

25274

Aaron Slonim

 

Jewish Mysticism

“H”

 T/R

2:50 – 4:15

 

LN 1406

JUST 311    

PHIL 311     

COLI 380F 

25361

21705

21784

Randy Friedman

Faith and Reason

T/R

10:05 – 11:30 

 

FA 342

JUST 351

HIST 380B

27711

24481

Gina Glasman

Jewish New York

“J”

T/R

1:15 – 2:40

 

LN 2405

JUST 385B   

COLI 331F     

ENG 380E  

EDUC 580H

25155

21923

17841

23465

 

Paul-William Burch

Post-Holocaust Literature

“W”

4:25 – 7:25

 

S1 158

JUST 485B  

ENG 450B   

COLI 480T  

EDUC 580U 

25175

23909

25176

19379

Paul-William Burch

Holocaust Fiction

“C”

W

4:40 – 7:40

 

 

S1 158 

JUST 280J (12)      

HIST 286J (30)

27137

26903

Doug Jones

“Radical Religious Movements”

 

 T/R

1:15 – 2:40

 

 

 UU 206

JUST  380A

COLI 380U

 

27540

 

Neil  Pages

 “Kafka and His Readers”

M/W

8:10 – 9:35 PM

 

LN G335

JUST 380G

AFST 370

25044

 

 Ali

Bouanani

“Convivencia in Islamic Spain

  T/R

10:05 – 11:30

 

 

LH 013

JUST 484C

HIST 484C

27845

27876

Jonathan Karp

“Religion and Enlightenment”

 

M

2:20 – 5:20

 

FA 352

 

HEBREW

 

 HEBR 102 

 

10362

Orly Shoer

Hebrew II

 MTWR 8:30 – 9:30

FA 242

 HEBR 204

 

 22023

Orly Shoer

Intermediate Hebrew

MWF 9:40 – 10:40

FA 242

HEBR 312  

 

25138

Orly Shoer

Texts and Conversations

MWF 10:50 – 11:50

FA 242

 

YIDDISH

 YIDD 102   (20)

 

 

 21882

 Gina Glasman

Yiddish II

MWF 10:50 – 11:50

AB 125

  

FALL 2014 

JUST 111/PHIL 111/COLI 180N (crn’s:  24589/24594/23464)

Title:  Philosophy of Religion; (“H”);  M/W/F 1:10 – 2:10

Instructor:  Randy L. Friedman, Room SW 329

Description:

This introductory course will explore the many philosophical and methodological questions which emerge from the study of religious thought.  Topics will include the nature of religious subjectivity, divinity, prayer, sacrifice, and faith.  We will study some central biblical stories and narratives and literary, philosophical, and theological responses to them.  Students will practice techniques of textual exegesis and directly engage texts.

 

JUST 251/YIDD 251/COLI 280Y (crn’s: 25149/25150/19324)

Title:  Modern Yiddish Culture (“H”, “J”);  T/R 1:15 – 2:40

Instructor:  Gina Glasman; Room SW 329

Description:

“It’s hard to be a Jew”: An exploration of Modern Yiddish Culture and Society

Course description:  This course offers an introduction to Yiddish culture and Yiddish-speaking society in the modern era. Selections from Yiddish literature, cinema, stage and song provide a vehicle to explore the depiction of East European Jewish society during a period of radical transformation and catastrophe from the early 19th to the mid-20th century.  Taught in English

 

JUST 252/PHIL 280A/ COLI 280I (crn’s: 26157, 26247/22800)

Title:  American Jewish Thought (“J”); M/W/R/ 2:20 – 3:20

Instructor:  Randy Friedman; Room  SW 329

Description:

This course reviews some of the central influences on, and concerns and consequences of American Jewish thought. Question include: the relationship between theology and democratic culture, challenges to inherited religious traditions, the influence of feminist thought on religious practice, and the place and function of religious authority.

Prerequisites:  None

JUST 284A (crn: 23396)

Title:  Jewish Biomedical Ethics: Matters of Life and Death; (“H”); T/R 10:05 – 11:30

Instructor:  Rivkah Slonim; Room: AP G014

Description:

This course offers students an in-depth yet introductory exploration of issues pertaining to life and death as these are discussed in Jewish law and philosophy. In the main, the course focuses on Jewish approaches to bio-ethical dilemmas that arise around the beginning and end of life. The remainder provides background information meant to provide the student with an appreciation of the philosophy in which the legal discussions are grounded. Through the study of primary Jewish sources - Biblical, Talmudic, and Rabbinic, both past and present - students will explore the Jewish legal decisions and the philosophical reasoning that drives them. They will analyze the ways in which this system both intersects and diverges from the four classic principles of Western medical ethics: autonomy, justice, non-maleficence and beneficence.

 

JUST  284E/HIST 285C; (crn’s: 15073/26435)

Title:  Messianism in Jewish History; (“W”) T/R 2:50 – 4:15

Instructor:  Allan Arkush, Room : FA 209

Description: 

This course will trace the history of Jewish Messianism, from biblical times to the present.  Subjects will include the development of the messianic idea in the postbiblical period, messianic Jewish activism in the Roman Empire, medieval and early modern messianic movements, modern interpretations of the messianic idea, and the relationship between Zionism and Messianism.  Grades based on mid-term (30%), two reaction papers (30%), final exam (30%), and class participation.

 

JUST 342/HIST 385H/CLAS 380G; (crn’s: 23362/23810/23855)

Title:  Between Persians and Islam; (“H”, “W”); T/R 11:40 – 1:05

Instructor:  Jonathan Karp; Room: S2 143

Description:

This survey course traces the history of Jews and Judaism against the background of imperial domination, from the Persian, Greek, and Roman empires through the seventh-century rise of Islam.  The basic challenge Jews faced was how to maintain a degree of political autonomy and bolster their religious identity in the face of powerful systems of foreign rule.  But that is only part of the story: in fact Judaism itself underwent repeated redefinition and evolution in the face of these challenges.

This course focuses on the internal political struggles of competing religious factions, the proliferation of new Jewish sects, including Christians, Essenes, Pharisees, Sadducees and Zealots, the complex relations between Jews and non-Jews both in the Land of Israel and in the Diaspora, and the development of rabbinic Judaism and its monumental texts. This course will offer insight into the history of the Near East generally in the period of late antiquity.  No previous knowledge of the subject or of Jewish history is required.

JUST 347/HIST 347; (crn’s: 15076/15633)

Title:  Modern Israel; (“W”); W 5:50 – 8:50

Instructor:  Allan Arkush; Room: SW 313

Description:

This course will trace the political and cultural history of Israel from the formation of the Zionist movement at the end of the 19th century to the last years of the 20th century. It will examine Zionist ideologies and settlement projects, the Israel-Arab conflict, issues relating to religion and state in Israel, the development of Israeli culture and other subjects.  Grades based on midterm (30%), final exam (30%), seminar paper (30%), and class participation (10%). 

 

JUST 361/HIST 380P; (crn’s: 26142/23876)

Title:  “The Bible and Its Interpretations”; (“C”, “H”); M/W 3:30 – 5:00

Instructor:  Doug Jones; Room: FA 346

Description:

This course takes a comparative approach to the history of biblical interpretation by looking at

diverse communities within the Jewish and Christian traditions.  How have these communities used the Bible to understand their place in history, address present tribulations, and even predict the future? What major conflicts have arisen over the issue of interpretation? Some topics include the theme of movement in the Torah and rabbinical tradition, 18th and 19th century biblical scholarship, the meaning of allegory in Catholic and Protestant interpretation, and the so-called literal sense of scripture. We will also close by considering the issue of biblical interpretation as it relates to new religious movements in America.

 

JUST 385A/COLI 380B/EDUC 580I/ENG 380M; (crn’s:  23724/22183/23088/19194)

Title:  “Holocaust Literature”;  (“H”/ W”); T 4:25 – 7:25

Instructor:  Paul-William Burch; Room: SW 324

Description:

Students in this course read literature of the Holocaust—the Shoah—including diaries, journals, memoirs, fiction, poetry and works of popular culture, informed by the belief that literary responses to the Holocaust are, as  the poet Carolyn Forché has written, in themselves "material evidence of that-which-occurred." The course includes works by First Generation writers, victims and survivors who bear direct witness to the horror, as well as pieces by Second Generation writers, children and “offspring” of Holocaust survivors who bear witness to the witnesses and to events that they did not live through but that shaped their lives. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.  Cross-listed with English, Comparative Literature and Education. THIS COURSE IS NOT APPROPRIATE FOR FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.

 

JUST 451/HIST 485K; (crn’s: 26128/ )

Title:  “Jews and the European City”; T/R 10:05 – 11:30

Instructor:  Gina Glasman; Room: OW 100B

Course Description:

What was city life like for European Jewry once the ghetto walls – figurative or real - came tumbling down? With a few select cities as our focus, this class will consider the urban character of Jewish society in the modern era, from the streets of London to the sea front in Odessa.  Contemporary historical material, including literature, theater and song, plays a key role in class study.  All material will be in English translation.

 

JUST 459/PAFF 558J; (crn’s 25147/25743)

Title:  “Jewish Non-Profit Organizations”; W 1:40 – 4:40

Instructor:  Barbara Goldman-Wartell; Room: To be announced

Course Description:

This course examines the organizations and networks that make up the Jewish community in the United States. The goal of the course is to deconstruct the concept of “community” and to understand how institutions fulfill the purposes of community. The course covers the history of Jewish communal institutions in the U.S. and how they came to create the landscape of organizations that exist today. The main part of the course explores the rich, diverse, and complex landscape of Jewish communal organizations that exist today.  The course looks at many types of organizations, including some emerging organizations and how they fit into the landscape of the Jewish Non-Profit world.

Prerequisites: None

  

JUST 485A/PHIL 480C/PHIL 580D; (crn’s 23717/16137/26488)

Title:  “Testimony and the Holocaust”; M 1:40 – 4:40

Instructor:  Bat-Ami Bar On; Room:  LT 1210

Course Description:

Testimonial knowledge is a common kind of knowledge. But not all testimonial knowledge claims are or should be scrutinized in the same way. In this course we will study several interrelated questions that arise when thinking about testimonial knowledge in the context of producing knowledge of a specific historical event (or elements and aspects of it) - the Holocaust (or shoa). The course will be divided into three parts. In the first, we will examine testimonial knowledge in a juridical context and look at different ways it was/is approached by lawyers and in a courtroom. In the second part, we will examine testimonial knowledge in a historical context and look at the way historians and museums approach it. In the third, we will look at the relation of testimony to memory and how issues of epistemic justice intersect with claims to testimonial knowledge.

 

 HEBREW

HEBR 101; (crn:  10326)

Title:  “Hebrew I”; MTWR 8:30 – 9:30

Instructor:  Orly Shoer; Room: 328

Course Description:

Hebrew 101 is the first semester of Modern Hebrew. The course is designed only for students with very little or no previous experience in the language. It offers a communicative introduction to Modern Hebrew language and its culture. It emphasizes all facets of the language – comprehension, speech, reading, grammar and writing. The focus of instruction is on enabling students to develop basic vocabulary and communicative skills in Modern Hebrew centering on the students' immediate surroundings and simple daily activities.

By the end of the course students will be able to read and write short stories, voice their opinion, converse and use basic grammar.

Prerequisites: None

 

HEBR 203; (crn: 10368)

Title:  “Hebrew III”; M/W/F 9:40 – 10:40

Instructor:  Orly Shoer; Room: SW 328

Course Description:

Hebrew 203 is the third course in the Modern Hebrew program sequence, and the last course needed to fulfill the Binghamton University’s foreign language requirement. It focuses on increasing students' confidence in using the language in different social settings. This course is designed to advance the Hebrew learner to the intermediate-high level by introducing complex grammatical structure forms and sentences. Grammar teaching covers three of the main verb structures. The course concentrates on improving speaking, writing, as well as, working on text analysis and comprehension skills. 

Prerequisites: HEBR 102 with a grade of C- or better, a placement exam, or permission of the instructor.

 

HEBR 311; (crn: 23388)

Title:  Texts and Readings; M/W/F/ 10:50 – 11:50

Instructor:  Orly Shoer; Room: SW 328

Course Description:

Hebrew 311 is an advanced-intermediate Hebrew language and culture course that is intended for students who wish to further develop their vocabulary building and practice all four language skills, with an emphasis on reading comprehension, grammar, syntax, composition, vocabulary building and conversation. Students will advance their Hebrew language skills through reading, discussing and writing about a variety of texts, with some emphasis placed on short articles.

Prerequisites: HEBR 204 with a grade of C- or better, a placement exam, or permission of the instructor.

 

YIDDISH 

YIDD 101; (crn:  15080)

Title:  Yiddish 1; M/W/F 10:50 – 11:50

Instructor:  Gina Glasman; Room: AB 125

Course Description:

Yiddish 101 is the first semester of the Yiddish language course sequence and is intended for beginners. It introduces students to the Yiddish language and its culture.  It emphasizes all facets of the language – comprehension, speech, reading, grammar and writing. The focus of instruction is on enabling students to develop basic skills.

 

Rev. 2014.03.20

 

SPRING 2014

JUDAIC STUDIES

JUST243/HIST 285B/MDVL 270E (crn: 21721/27099/26142

Title: "Medieval Jewish History "; ("H", "W"); M/W/F 9:40 – 10:40;

Instructor: Dina Danon; Room AB 125

Description:

This course will study the experience of Jews living under medieval Islam and Christianity. It will focus primarily on the relationships between Jews and the social, cultural, religious, and economic environments with which they interacted in both the Islamic Mediterranean and Middle East and Christian Europe. It will begin in the 7th century, when as a result of the emergence of Islam and its rapid subsequent conquests, the vast majority of world Jewry found itself living under Islam. The course will trace the major contours of Jewish life in the medieval Islamic world, among them the dhimma, communal life, participation in Mediterranean trade, and the intellectual and cultural achievements of the "Golden Age of Spain." The course will then shift its attention to Europe, studying in a comparative perspective how the Jews of Latin Christendom fared during the Middle Ages. Among the principal topics covered will be Church doctrine on Judaism, intellectual ferment in Ashkenaz, anti-Jewish violence, and religious polemic.

 

JUST 244/HIST 244; (crn: 14929/11557)

Title: "Modern Jewish History"; ("H"); T/R 8:30 – 9:55

Instructor: Allan Arkush, Room S1 158

Description:

This course focuses on the history of the Jews from 1750 to the end of the 20th century in Europe, the Middle East and North America. It explores the religious, ideological and social development of diverse Jewish communities confronting the challenges and threats of modernity. Subjects include the struggle or Jewish emancipation, the rise of denominationalism, anti-Semitism and Zionism.

 

Two lectures per week. Grades based on midterm (30%), two reaction papers (30%) and final exam (40%).

 

JUST 280J/HIST 286J/; (crn's: 27137/26903)

Title: "Religion & Pop Culture 1400-1700" ; T/R 1:15 – 2:40

Instructor: Doug Jones, Room S2 143

Description:

Religion and Popular Culture, 1400-1700. This course covers a diverse array of topics in the study of what historians have commonly termed "popular culture," from late-medieval magic to ghost stories in early New England (c. 1400-1700). Particular focus will be given to the relationship between popular or folk culture and the mainstream cultures of Judaism and Christianity in Europe. Other topics include the circulation of cheap print, tales of the demonic and monstrous, wonder literature, and popular utopias.

 

JUST 284B (crn: 25274)

Title: "Jewish Mysticism"; T/R 2:50 – 4:15

Instructor: Aaron Slonim; Room EB 925

Description:

This course focuses on the Jewish mystical response to existential questions about the origin and purpose of the universe, the relationship of man and God, the source and nature of man's soul and the cosmic affects of humankind's actions and its interplay with other spheres of existence. Through a study of various literary froms -- from the earliest Biblical sources to twentieth century texts -- this course provides a survey of basic concepts in Kabbalah ( the Jewish mystical tradition) such as :Ein Sof: The Dialectic of the Infinite, Tzimtzum : a Kabbalistic Theory of Creation, Sefirot: Foundations for a Ten Dimension Universe, and Olamot: The Worlds as described in Kabbalah, among others. Books include: The Anthology of Jewish Mysticism by Raphael Ben Zion, The Kabbalistic Tradition by Alan Unterman, The Thirteen Petaled Rose by Adin Steinsa

 

JUST 344/HIST 381K/MDVL 380O (crn: 26178/26179/26220)

 Title: "Renaissance and Early Modern Jewish History" ("H", "W"); T/R 10:05 – 11:30

Instructor: Gina Glasman; Room: SW 325

Description:

Beginning at the close of the 15th century and ending on the cusp of the 18th, our course tells the story of an in-between age that contains the dramatic movement of Jews across Europe and the Mediterranean basin, the ghettoization of some communities, the opening up of others, the rise of new ideas, new economic relationships, of messianic fever and humanistic thought. This course will have a global flavour as we seek to define a key chapter in the history of both Eastern and Western Jewry.

 

JUST 347/ HIST 347 (crn: 15041/15592)

Title: "Modern Israel"; ("W"); W 1:40 – 4:40

Instructor: Allan Arkush; Room DC 221

Description:

This course will trace the political and cultural history of Israel from the formation of the Zionist movement at the end of the 19th century to the last years of the 20th century. It will examine Zionist ideologies and settlement projects, the Israel-Arab conflict, issues relating to religion and state in Israel, the development of Israeli culture and other subjects.

 

Grades based on midterm (30%), seminar papers (30%), and final exam (30%).

 

JUST 384A/HIST 380B; (crn: 26180/24481)

Title: "Jewish New York"; ("J"); T/R 1:15 – 2:40

Instructor: Gina Glasman; Room: SW 329

Description:
How and why did New York become so Jewish? Whether as bankers or gangsters, tailors or songwriters, Jews have played a critical role in the economic, political and cultural life of this quintessential American metropolis. Students are encouraged to explore this vital aspect of New York's past through a variety of sources, including newspapers, city archives and the photographic record. All material for class will be in English translation.

 

JUST 384G/HIST 380G/AFST 380V; (crn: 21631/ 18544/27043)

Title: "Blacks and Jews in American Culture", ("W"), T/R 10:05 – 11:30

Instructor: Jonathan Karp; Room: LN 1404

Description:

Focuses on spheres of cultural confluence and conflict, such as religion, music, literature and film, set against a backdrop of shifting ideologies. Attempts to distinguish between the very different historical experiences of blacks and Jews in America while at the same time analyzing the various ways in which both groups have sometimes expressed a sense of shared experience and identity. Addresses the distinctions between cultural influence and imitation, literary depiction and distortion, economic collaboration and exploitation, but ultimate aim is to grasp how, despite the ongoing history of racism in the U.S., the interaction of groups such as blacks and Jews has helped continuously to reshape the broader contours of American cultural life.

 

JUST 385B/ COLI 331F/ENG 380E/EDUC 580H; (Crn: 25155/21923/17841/23465)

Title: "Post Holocaust Literature"; ("W"); T 4:25 – 7:25

Instructor: Paul-William Burch; Room: SW 324

Description:

This course addresses primarily fiction and memoir written after the Holocaust by second- and third-generation descendants of survivors of the Shoah. Central to our reading will be issues of representation, authenticity, the role of memory, the problems and limits of language, questions of trauma, the phenomenon of post-memory, and the development of post-Holocaust Jewish identities.

 

Note: Not appropriate for first-year students.

 

JUST 484B/HIST 485J/ARAB 480F; (Crn: 27100/27107/ 27173);

Title: "Sephardi and Mizrahi Voices: History Through Personal Accounts", T/R 8:30 – 9:55

Instructor: Dina Danon; Room: FA 242

Course Description:

Sephardi and Mizrahi Voices: History through Personal Accounts

This course will study personal narratives of authors of Sephardi and Mizrahi descent, an area of literature that has seen significant growth recently. Students will learn in an in-depth manner about the history of each author's area of origin and how the local context informs their writings. Among the historical themes that the course will address through these autobiographies and memoirs are westernization, conflicting nationalisms in the Middle East, cultural belonging, and marginality. In addition to gaining exposure to the history of the Jewish communities of places such as modern day Iraq, Iran, and Egypt among others, students will engage in important methodological issues as they dissect the many ways in which autobiography and memoir can both illuminate and obfuscate history. Students will immerse themselves in the methodological concerns specific to historical analysis, as they reflect upon questions of genre, voice, documentation, and representation.

 

JUST 484D/HIST 484E/HIST 567L; (Crn's: 26894/26929/26931)

Title: "Capitalism and the Jews"; M 2:20 – 5:20

Instructor: Jonathan Karp; SW 310

Course Description:

Although Jews are an ancient people, they have often been linked with the emergence of the characteristically modern economic system of capitalism. This course explores this linkage in both fact and fantasy. But it also assesses the profound impact that capitalism – a system Jews variously revered and reviled – has exerted on modern Jewish life. Readings will include philosophical texts, pioneering works of economic history, as well as a spate of recent studies that shed fresh light on an old but still controversial topic.

 

JUST 485B/ENG 450B/ COLI 480T/EDUC 580U; (Crn's: 25175 23267/25176/19379);

Title: "Holocaust Fiction"; W 4:40 – 7:40

Instructor: Paul-William Burch: Room: SW 324

Course Description:

Issues of memory, representation, and voice are addressed in the reading of Holocaust fiction. The class reads through the prism of the literature of witness novels and short stories—most by Holocaust survivors—including works by Appelfeld, Fink, Borowski, Grynberg, Lustig, Nomberg- Przytyk, Rawicz, Kosinski, and Wiesel. Several short papers, mid-term examination, and final examination are required. Accompanied by a speaker/lecture series. Notes: prerequisite, sophomore standing; not appropriate for first-year students. Required texts may include: Lawrence Langer, Art from the Ashes (Anthology), Piotr Rawicz, Blood from the Sky, Jerzy Kosiński, The Painted Bird, Elie Wiesel, Gates of the Forest, Hans Keilson, The Death of the Adversary, David Grossman, See Under: Love, André Schwarz-Bart, The Last of the Just.

 

LANGUAGES

 

HEBREW COURSES

 

HEBR 102 ; (crn: 10362) 

Title: Hebrew II; MTWR 8:30 – 9:30

Instructor: Orly Shoer; Room: SW 328

 

Course Description:

Second semester of the communicative introduction to the language and its culture. Provides a thorough grounding in reading, writing, grammar, oral comprehension, and speaking. Prerequisites: HEBR 101 with a grade of C- or equivalent or permission of instructor.

 

HEBR 204; (crn: 22023)

Title: Intermediate Hebrew, MWF 9:40 – 10:40

Instructor: Orly Shoer; Room SW 328

Course Description:

 

Intermediate-level language and culture course with emphasis on the reading of literary and non-literary texts, grammar and writing. Prerequisite: HEBR 103 with a grade of C- or equivalent or permission of instructor.

 

HEBR 312; (crn: 25138)

Title: Texts and Conversations; MWF 10:50 – 11:50

Instructor: Orly Shoer; Room: SW 328

Course Description:

In this course students will advance their Hebrew language skills through reading, discussing and writing about a variety of short fiction and nonfiction texts and visual material. Writing practice and reviewing of grammar will be incorporated through the presented materials. Taught in Hebrew. Prerequisites: HEBR 204 with a grade of C- or equivalent or permission of instructor.

 

YIDDISH COURSES:

YIDD 102; (crn: 21882)

Title: Yiddish II; MWF 10:50 – 11:50

Instructor: Gina Glasman; Room: S2 132

Course Description:

Second semester of the communicative introduction to the language and its culture. Provides a thorough grounding in reading, writing, grammar, oral comprehension, and speaking. Prerequisites: YIDD 101 with a grade of C- or equivalent or permission of instructor.

 

Rev. 2013.10.21

 

FALL 2013

JUST 251/YIDD 251/COLI 280Y; (CRN'S: 25149/25150/19324) Modern Yiddish Culture "C", "J", "H" T/R 1:15 PM – 2:40 PM; Gina Glasman; LN 1402

"It's hard to be a Jew": An exploration of Modern Yiddish Culture and Society Course description: This course offers an introduction to Yiddish culture and Yiddish-speaking society in the modern era. Selections from Yiddish literature, cinema, stage and song provide a vehicle to explore the depiction of East European Jewish society during a period of radical transformation and catastrophe from the early 19th to the mid-20th century. Taught in English.

JUST 284A; (CRN: 23396) Jewish Biomedical Ethics: Matters of Life and Death T/R 10:05 AM – 11:30 AM; Rivkah Slonim; AP G014

This course offers students an in-depth yet introductory exploration of issues pertaining to life and death as these are discussed in Jewish law and philosophy. In the main, the course focuses on Jewish approaches to bio-ethical dilemmas that arise around the beginning and end of life. The remainder provides background information meant to provide the student with an appreciation of the philosophy in which the legal discussions are grounded. Through the study of primary Jewish sources - Biblical, Talmudic, and Rabbinic, both past and present - students will explore the Jewish legal decisions and the philosophical reasoning that drives them. They will analyze the ways in which this system both intersects and diverges from the four classic principles of Western medical ethics: autonomy, justice, non-maleficence and beneficence.

JUST 342/HIST 385H/CLAS 380G; (CRN: 23362/23810/23855) Between Persians and Islam, "H", "W" T/R 2:50 PM – 4:15 PM; Jonathan Karp; S2 337

This survey course traces the history of Jews and Judaism against the background of imperial domination, from the Persian, Greek, and Roman empires through the seventh-century rise of Islam. The basic challenge Jews faced was how to maintain a degree of political autonomy and bolster their religious identity in the face of powerful systems of foreign rule. But that is only part of the story: in fact Judaism itself underwent repeated redefinition and evolution in the face of these challenges. This course focuses on the internal political struggles of competing religious factions, the proliferation of new Jewish sects, including Christians, Essenes, Pharisees, Sadducees and Zealots, the complex relations between Jews and non-Jews both in the Land of Israel and in the Diaspora, and the development of rabbinic Judaism and its monumental texts. This course will offer insight into the history of the Near East generally in the period of late antiquity. No previous knowledge of the subject or of Jewish history is required.

JUST 380B/HIST 380P; (CRN'S: 25400/23876) The Bible and Its Interpretation, "C", "H" M/W 1:15 PM – 2:40 PM; Douglas Jones; SW 311

This course takes a comparative approach to the history of biblical interpretation by looking at diverse communities within the Jewish and Christian traditions. How have these communities used the Bible to understand their place in history, address present tribulations, and even predict the future? What major conflicts have arisen over the issue of interpretation? Some topics include the theme of movement in the Torah and rabbinical tradition, 18th and 19th century biblical scholarship, the meaning of allegory in Catholic and Protestant interpretation, and the so-called literal sense of scripture. We will also close by considering the issue of biblical interpretation as it relates to new religious movements in America.

JUST 380D (CRN: 25401) Jews Under Islam During Modern Times, "G", "H", "W" T/R 11:40 AM – 1:05 PM; Dina Danon; S1 158

This course seeks to examine the Jewish experience in the lands of Islam in modern times. We will begin our inquiry in the early 19th century, when these communities, dispersed across the Middle East, North Africa, and Southeastern Europe, encountered a "modernity" largely shaped by an ascendant West in the political, cultural, and economic arenas. Through a rich array of primary sources, such as diplomatic documents, personal correspondence, memoirs, as well as films and photographs, we will aim to identify the many ways in which these Jewish communities renegotiated their cultural identities and political affiliations through the middle of the twentieth century. We will also examine how the changes of the modern period impacted relations between the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim communities of these regions.

JUST 385A/COLI 380B/EDUC 580I; (CRN's: 23724/22183/23088) Holocaust Literature, "W" T 4:25 PM – 7:25 PM; Paul-William Burch; SW 324

This course examines literary responses to the Holocaust—the Shoah—including diaries, journals, memoirs, fiction, and poetry. Work in the course is informed by the belief that literary responses to the Holocaust are, as Carolyn Forché has written, in themselves "material evidence of that-which-occurred." The literature of witness in particular provides an enrichment of the narrative of History—not a counterpoint to History, but a deepening and focusing of it. We will read Holocaust literature—first, works by First Generation writers, victims and survivors who bear witness to the horror; and later, pieces by Second Generation writers, the children and "offspring" of Holocaust survivors who bear witness to the witnesses and to events that they did not live through but that shaped their lives. Readings and discussions address such issues as the evidentiary nature of literary responses to the Shoah, the problem of representation, and the literary commodification of the Holocaust. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. THIS COURSE IS NOT APPROPRIATE FOR FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.

JUST 459/PAFF 558J; (CRN: 25147/25743) Jewish Non-Profit Organizations, "C" R 1:15 PM – 4:15 PM; Shana Kantor; FA 250

This course examines the organizations and networks that make up the Jewish community in the United States. The goal of the course is to deconstruct the concept of "community" and to understand how institutions fulfill the purposes of community. The course covers the history of Jewish communal institutions in the U.S. and how they came to create the landscape of organizations that exist today. The main part of the course explores the rich, diverse, and complex landscape of Jewish communal organizations that exist today. The course looks at many types of organizations, including some emerging organizations and how they fit into the landscape of the Jewish Non-Profit world. Prerequisites: None

JUST 484A/ HIST 485H; (CRN: 23366/25669) Jews and Crime, "C" M 1:40 PM – 4:40 PM; Jonathan Karp; DC 224

For millennia Jews have been accused of committing horrendous crimes, not just as individuals but collectively as a people. Christianity charged the "the Jews" with the ultimate crime of deicide; while during Middle Ages Jews were frequently labeled ritual murders and forced to endure severe collective penalties. In the modern a stereotype emerged of Jews as possessing a culture of criminality, especially with regard to economic or financial misdeeds. This course examines both the stereotypes surrounding Jewish criminality and specific cases of Jews' actual involvement in criminal activity, from criminal gangs in eighteenth-century Germany, smuggling rings in nineteenth-century Eastern Europe and the rise of Jewish mobsters like Louis "Lepke" Buchalter and Meyer Lansky in twentieth-century America. We will try to put Jewish criminality in historical perspective, examining the role it played in non-Jews' perceptions and in the Jewish community's own efforts to come to terms with the reality and image of criminals in their midst.

HEBREW

HEBR 101; (CRN: 10326) Hebrew I M/W 8:30 AM – 9:30 AM; SW 328 T/R 8:30 AM – 9:30 AM; SW 326, Orly Shoer

Hebrew 101 is the first semester of Modern Hebrew. The course is designed only for students with very little or no previous experience in the language. It offers a communicative introduction to Modern Hebrew language and its culture. It emphasizes all facets of the language – comprehension, speech, reading, grammar and writing. The focus of instruction is on enabling students to develop basic vocabulary and communicative skills in Modern Hebrew centering on the students' immediate surroundings and simple daily activities. By the end of the course students will be able to read and write short stories, voice their opinion, converse and use basic grammar. Prerequisites: None

HEBR 203; (CRN: 10368) Hebrew III MWF 9:40 AM – 10:40 AM; Orly Shoer; SW 328

Hebrew 203 is the third course in the Modern Hebrew program sequence, and the last course needed to fulfill the Binghamton University's foreign language requirement. It focuses on increasing students' confidence in using the language in different social settings. This course is designed to advance the Hebrew learner to the intermediate-high level by introducing complex grammatical structure forms and sentences. Grammar teaching covers three of the main verb structures. The course concentrates on improving speaking, writing, as well as, working on text analysis and comprehension skills. Prerequisites: HEBR 102 with a grade of C- or better, a placement exam, or permission of the instructor.

HEBR 311; (CRN: 23388) Texts and Readings MWF 10:50 AM – 11:50 AM; SW 328

Hebrew 311 is an advanced-intermediate Hebrew language and culture course that is intended for students who wish to further develop their vocabulary building and practice all four language skills, with an emphasis on reading comprehension, grammar, syntax, composition, vocabulary building and conversation. Students will advance their Hebrew language skills through reading, discussing and writing about a variety of texts, with some emphasis placed on short articles. Prerequisites: HEBR 204 with a grade of C- or better, a placement exam, or permission of the instructor.

YIDDISH YIDD 101; (CRN: 15080) Yiddish I MWF 10:50 AM – 11:50 AM; Gina Glasman

Yiddish 101 is the first semester of the Yiddish language course sequence and is intended for beginners. It introduces students to the Yiddish language and its culture. It emphasizes all facets of the language – comprehension, speech, reading, grammar and writing. The focus of instruction is on enabling students to develop basic skills.

YIDD 251/JUST 251/COLI 280Y; (CRN'S: 25150/25149/19324) Modern Yiddish Culture, "H", "J", "C" TR 1:15 PM – 2:40 PM; Gina Glasman; LN 1402

"It's hard to be a Jew": An exploration of Modern Yiddish Culture and Society Course description: This course offers an introduction to Yiddish culture and Yiddish-speaking society in the modern era. Selections from Yiddish literature, cinema, stage and song provide a vehicle to explore the depiction of East European Jewish society during a period of radical transformation and catastrophe from the early 19th to the mid-20th century. Taught in English. YIDD 480A; (CRN: 25674) Yiddish Theatre, "W" T/R 10:05 AM – 11:30 AM; Gina Glasman An overview of Yiddish Theatre from its earliest beginnings in Europe, to the twentieth century stage on Second Avenue. Students will read Yiddish plays – in translation – representing a variety of styles and examine the function of drama in Jewish culture and society.

 


Spring 2013 Courses

Fall 2012 Courses

JUDAIC STUDIES

JUST 111/PHIL 111/COLI 180N “H” (CRN: 24589/24594/23464)

Philosophy of Religion, TR 1315 – 1440 SL 212,Randy Friedman

Course Description:

This introductory course explores some of the many philosophical and methodological questions that emerge from the study of religious thought.  Topics include the nature of religious subjectivity, divinity, prayer, sacrifice, and faith.  We will study some central biblical stories and narratives and literary, philosophical, and theological responses to them.  Students will practice techniques of textual exegesis and directly engage texts. All 4 sections will be held on Fridays. Prerequisites:  None

JUST 244/HIST 244 “H”, “W” (CRN: 14055/15598)

Modern Jewish History, TR 08:30-09:55, Allan Arkush

Course Description: 

This course focuses on the history of the Jews from 1750 to the end of the 20th century in Europe, the Middle East, and North America. It explores the religious, ideological, and social development of diverse Jewish communities confronting the challenges and threats of modernity. Subjects include the struggle for Jewish emancipation, the rise of denominationalism, anti-semitism and Zionism.  Prerequisites:  None

JUST 345A/JUST 345B/HIST 345A/HIST 345B, (CRN: 210181/22819/21078/22818)

The Holocaust MW 1420 – 1620, Wulf Kansteiner

Course Description:  

The class offers an in depth analysis of the causes, development, and reactions to the genocide of European Jewry launched by the government of the Third Reich and perpetrated by a wide range of officials of that regime. The events between 1939 and 1945 are the main focus of the course but we will also look at the long-term causes of the Holocaust, discuss the evolution of Nazi anti-Semitic policy in the 1930s, and study postwar attempts of coming to terms with perpetration, collaboration and survival.

COURSE ONLY OPEN TO FRESHMEN BY PERMISSION OF DEPARTMENT. PLEASE CONTACT THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT.

FORMAT: Course grades will be based on midterm (20%); 6-8 page essay (20%); 10-14 page essay (30%); non-cumulative final (20%); participation (10%).

BOOKS: Friedlander, Nazi Germany and the Jews, volumes 1 and 2; Lebow et al., The Politics of Memory in Postwar Europe

JUST 384A/PHIL 380F/COLI 380A“C” “H”  (CRN: 23791/18958/16900)

American Jewish Thought, M 1340 - 1640, Randy Friedman

Course Description:

This course reviews some of the central influences on, and concerns and consequences of American Jewish thought. Question include: the relationship between theology and democratic culture, challenges to inherited religious traditions, the influence of feminist thought on religious practice, and the place and function of religious authority. Prerequisites:  None

JUST 384B “H” “W”, (CRN: 15079)

The Zionist Idea, W 1340 -1640, Allan Arkush

Course Description:

This course will concentrate on close readings of the writings of political, cultural, religious, socialist and other thinkers who formulated and elaborated the idea of creating a Jewish state . It will begin with a study of Leon Pinsker, Theodor Herzl, and other founding fathers of Zionism and conclude with an examination of contemporary justifications of Zionism as well as critiques of Zionism by post-Zionist thinkers. Prerequisites:  None

JUST 385A/ENG 380L/COLI 380B/ EDUC 580I, “W” (CRN: 23724/23872/22183/23088)

Literary Responses to the Holocaust T 1625 – 1925, Paul-William Burch

Course Description:

This course examines literary responses to the Holocaust — the Shoah — including diaries, journals, memoirs, fiction, and poetry. Work in the course is informed by the belief that literary responses to the Holocaust are, as Carolyn Forché has written, in themselves, "material evidence of that-which-occurred." The literature of witness in particular provides an enrichment of the narrative of History—not a counterpoint to History, but a deepening and focusing of it. We will read Holocaust literature—first, works by First Generation writers, victims and survivors who bear witness to the horror; and later, pieces by Second Generation writers, the children and “offspring” of Holocaust survivors who bear witness to the witnesses and to events that they did not live through but that shaped their lives. Readings and discussions address such issues as the evidentiary nature of literary responses to the Shoah, the problem of representation, and the literary commodification of the Holocaust. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. THIS COURSE IS NOT APPROPRIATE FOR FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.

JUST 386B/PLSC 389N, (CRN: 23755/23364)

Government and Politics in Israel TR 1625 – 1750, Moaz Rosenthal

Course Description:

The institutional setting that defines the rules of the political game in Israel is complicated, mostly unstructured, based on many veto players and agenda setters, showing a constant conflict between the dynamics of change and stagnation. The players in this setting (individuals and organizations alike) maneuver within political, social and economic crises, while trying to mitigate a society characterized with overlapping and cross-cutting cleavages. Using the conceptual toolbox brought forth by rational-choice institutionalism, this course studies the players interacting in the Israeli case (voters, activists, party elites, parties, members of Knesset and their factions, government ministers, premiers and judges) and the rules of the game that guide them (historical traditions, social identities, the basic laws and the electoral method). This analysis uses rational-choice institutionalism concepts, comparative data and in-depth empirical study (qualitative and quantitative) of the Israeli case. That analysis will show that the Israeli case should be included in the comparative analysis of polities as whole and democratic politics in particular.

JUST 389B/PLSC 340, (CRN: 23720/22187)

Public Opinion TR 1315 – 1440, Jonathan Krasno

Course Description:

Examines the nature and dynamics of public opinion in American politics with a focus on the major trends in public opinion since World War II. Students examine different approaches to measuring and understanding what drives public opinion. Moreover, they focus on the effects of public opinion on the political process, including public policy and elections.

JUST 484C/COLI 480W, “H” (CRN: 23374/19128)

Cinematic Images of Jews and Israelis, MW 1750 - 1850, M 1900 - 2100 Sariel Birnbaum

Course Description:

This course explores some of the images of Jews, including Israeli Jews, in some of the most influential cinema industries around the world. Some visual and audio images of Jews from classic anti-Semitic sources are studied for the purpose of comparison with modern films. Another focal point is the Arab cinema. When the Egyptian cinematic industry appeared, many Jews took an important part in all areas of the cinematic productions. Later, in the 1950s and 1960s, several anti-Semitic films were made. In contemporary Arab films, namely 1990s and 2000s, anti-Semitic themes are rare, and we will discuss these changes. The films we will view will include films from Egypt, France, Nazi Germany, as well as some Yiddish films, and films about Israel. Prerequisites:  None                                                         

JUST 489A, “C”  (CRN: 24585)

Jewish Non-Profit Organizations, R 1315 - 1615   Shana Kantor

Course description:

This course examines the organizations and networks that make up the Jewish community in the United States. The goal of the course is to deconstruct the concept of “community” and to understand how institutions fulfill the purposes of community. The course covers the history of Jewish communal institutions in the U.S. and how they came to create the landscape of organizations that exist today. The main part of the course explores the rich, diverse, and complex landscape of Jewish communal organizations that exist today.  The course looks at many types of organizations, including some emerging organizations and how they fit into the landscape of the Jewish Non-Profit world. Prerequisites: None

LANGUAGES:

HEBREW

HEBR 101, (CRN: 10326)

Hebrew I, MTWTh, 0830 - 0930 Orly Shoer

Hebrew 101 is the first semester of Modern Hebrew. The course is designed only for students with very little or no previous experience in the language. It offers a communicative introduction to Modern Hebrew language and its culture. It emphasizes all facets of the language – comprehension, speech, reading, grammar and writing. The focus of instruction is on enabling students to develop basic vocabulary and communicative skills in Modern Hebrew centering on the students' immediate surroundings and simple daily activities.

By the end of the course students will be able to read and write short stories, voice their opinion, converse and use basic grammar. Prerequisites: None

HEBR 203 (CRN: 10368)

Hebrew III MWF, 0940 - 1040, Orly Shoer

Course Description:

Hebrew 203 is the third course in the Modern Hebrew program sequence, and the last course needed to fulfill the Binghamton University’s foreign language requirement. It focuses on increasing students' confidence in using the language in different social settings. This course is designed to advance the Hebrew learner to the intermediate-high level by introducing complex grammatical structure forms and sentences. Grammar teaching covers three of the main verb structures. The course concentrates on improving speaking, writing, as well as working on text analysis and comprehension skills. Prerequisites: HEBR 102 with a grade of C- or better, a placement exam or permission of the instructor.

HEBR 311  (CRN: 23388)

Texts and Readings, MWF, 1050 – 1150, Orly Shoer

Hebrew 311 is an advanced-intermediate Hebrew language and culture course that is intended for students who wish to further develop their vocabulary building and practice all four language skills, with an emphasis on reading comprehension, grammar, syntax, composition, vocabulary building and conversation. Students will advance their Hebrew language skills through reading, discussing and writing about a variety of texts, with some emphasis placed on short articles. Prerequisites: HEBR 204 with a grade of C- or better, a placement exam, or permission of the instructor.

HEBR 380A/JUST 386A/COLI 380X “W” (CRN: 24509/24514/21360)

Israeli Cinema, MW, 1420 - 1520, M 1530 - 1730, Sariel Birnbaum

Course description:

This course introduces students to the unique cinema industry of Israel, which is producing films in Hebrew, a language that is spoken only in Israel, by around 7 Million people. The main goal of the course is to explore some of the connections between historical and social developments and their cinematic representations. Among the subjects that will be discussed in the course are the representations of Israeli Jews arriving from Europe (Ashkenazim) and those arriving from Muslim Countries (Mizrahim), the predicament of Arab Israeli citizens, the shift from the "melting point" society to the more individualistic and more sectarian cinema. The course will be taught in Hebrew. Written work in the course can be pursued in Hebrew or English. Prerequisites: At least one 300 level Hebrew course or permission of instructor

YIDDISH

YIDD 101 (CRN: 15080)

Yiddish I, MWF, 1050 -- 1150, Gina Glasman

Course Description:

Yiddish 101 is the first semester of the Yiddish language course sequence and is intended for beginners. It introduces students to the Yiddish language and its culture. It emphasizes all facets of the language – comprehension, speech, reading, grammar and writing. The focus of instruction is on enabling students to develop basic skills.

YIDD 203 (CRN: 23390)

Yiddish III, TR 1005-1130, Gina Glasman

Course Description:

Yiddish 203 is the third course in the Yiddish courses sequence, and the last course needed to fulfill the Binghamton University’s foreign language requirement. The course strengthens student’s language skills and continues the development of reading, writing, grammar, oral comprehension, and speaking skills. Prerequisite: YIDD 102 with a grade of C- or equivalent or permission of instructor.

YIDD 280A/JUST 284T/COLI 280Y (CRN: 24517/15074/19324)

Yiddish Literature, TR 1315 – 1440, Gina Glasman

It’s hard to be a Jew”: An exploration of Modern Yiddish Culture and Society

Course description:

This course offers an introduction to Yiddish culture and Yiddish-speaking society in the modern era. Selections from Yiddish literature, cinema, stage and song provide a vehicle to explore the depiction of East European Jewish society during a period of radical transformation and catastrophe from the early 19th to the mid-20th century. Taught in English.

 

Rev. 03-12-2012

Spring Courses

JUDAIC STUDIES

JUST 243/HIST 243 "H" (CRN: 95771/95935)

Medieval Jewish History. TR 8:30-9:55. Joseph Hodes. SW 327

This course will survey Jewish history from the Destruction of the Second temple in 70CE to the expulsion from Spain in 1492. It will explore the emergence of Rabbinic Judaism, life in the Diaspora, the encounters with Christianity and Islam as well as Jewish mysticism. The course will explore how Judaism re-created itself without a homeland and how it was influenced by the worlds in which it existed. Some of the key figures and topics that will be explored include Maimonides, Jewish rationalism, Dhimmi status, Nahmanides, the Zohar and the crusader pogroms amongst others. Texts include but are not limited to The Jew in the Medieval world a source book by Jacob Marcus and The Jews of Arab Lands by Norman Stillman..

JUST 284B "H" (CRN: 99747)

Jewish Mysticism. TR 2:50-4:15p. Aaron Slonim. S2 243

This course focuses on the Jewish mystical response to existential questions about the origin and purpose of the universe, the relationship of man and God, the source and nature of man's soul and the cosmic affects of humankind's actions and its interplay with other spheres of existence. Through a study of various literary forms -- from the earliest Biblical sources to twentieth-century texts -- this course provides a survey of basic concepts in Kabbalah (the Jewish mystical tradition) such as: Ein Sof: The Dialectic of the Infinite, Tzimtzum: a Kabbalistic Theory of Creation, Sefirot: Foundations for a Ten Dimension Universe and  Olamot: The Worlds as described in Kabbalah, among others. Books include: The Anthology of Jewish Mysticism by Raphael Ben Zion, The Kabbalistic Tradition by Alan Unterman, The Thirteen Petaled Rose by Adin Steinsaltz.

JUST 284E "H" (CRN: 15363).

Judaism and Islam. TR 11:40-1:05p. Joseph Hodes. AP G 014

This course will examine the two Abrahamic faiths of Judaism and Islam. It will seek to examine these as religions of divine revelation. It will explore the religious foundations of both but will also explore their histories both shared and individual. It will explore primary texts such as the Torah and Quran, Talmud and the Hadith, and will also use secondary sources to examine how these religions lived together throughout the Middle Ages and how the relationship between the two religions has evolved and changed in the modern period. Some of the topics to be explored are the origins of the religions, divine revelation, the legal systems, mysticism (Kabbalah and Sufism), scripture and philosophy as well as fundamentalist movements. Texts will include selections from the Torah, the Quran, the Talmud, the Hadiths and The Middle East a Brief History of the Last 2000 Years by Bernard Lewis, amongst others.

JUST 284P (CRN: 93460)

Jewish Social Justice. TR 10:05-11:30. Shalom Kantor. LN G85

How does Judaism respond to the infinite need of the poor and oppressed and how does that apply and fit in to our day to day lives? This course will explore social justice in all its forms throughout the different periods of Jewish history. We will study and examine a wide variety of primary Jewish sources - Biblical, Talmudic, and Rabbinic, both past and present in order to gain a greater understanding of and appreciation for the Jewish call to action in places where injustice exists. Through external reading, in depth class discussions, and experience in the field students will begin to see the larger picture of social justice within the Jewish tradition and at the same time will come to appreciate the complexities that arise when specific Jewish legal concepts clash with the overarching call for Justice. Students will have the option to participate in a weekly, continuous volunteer experience (minimum of 2 hours a week) throughout the semester at a placement that reflects their personal interests. Topics could include:Poverty and charity, workers and employers, societal problems - the homeless and crime, Environmental problems of our day and age, advocacy versus action, and Spirituality and Activism.

Texts may include selections from: There Shall Be No Needy: Pursuing Social Justice through Jewish Law and Tradition by Rabbi Jill Jacobs, To Do The Right and The Good by Rabbi Elliot Dorf, Walking with Justice edited By Rabbi Bradley Shavit Artson and Deborah Silver, Judaism and Justice: The Jewish Passion to Repair the World by Rabbi Sydney Schwartz, To Heal a Fractured World: The Ethics of Responsibility by Rabbi Jonathan Sacks.

JUST 311/PHIL 311/COLI 380F "C", H" (CRN: 99840/95748/95844)

Faith and Reason. M 1:40-4:40p. Randy Friedman. SW 313

This reading-intensive course will explore the philosophical and religious tensions in and between the categories of faith and philosophy. What are the consequences of distinguishing faith from reason?  How are we to understand the nature and demands of faith?  What is the relationship between religious belief and rationality?  Topics will include the nature of religious subjectivity, divinity, metaphysics, the supernatural, creation, revelation, and religious experience.  We will work through three pairs of thinkers to compare their respective approaches. Section one includes Maimonides and Spinoza; Section two includes Kant and Hegel; Section three pairs Cohen and Rosenzweig.  We will conclude the semester reading through a recent work in philosophy of religion by Jurgen Habermas. In addition to the content of this course, students will practice the process skills of reading and writing critically.  Students will be expected to read the texts carefully and to come to class prepared to ask and answer questions. The course will require at least 100 pages of reading each week.

JUST 347/HIST 347 (CRN: 15366/16000).

Modern Israel. W 1:40-4:40p. Joseph Hodes. SW 315

This course will trace the cultural and political history of Israel from the creation of Zionism in the 19th century to the foundation of the Jewish state in May 1948 to the present day. We will explore key events and controversies that shaped the nation such as the ingathering of exiles where between 1948-1951 the state absorbed 684,000 Jews from across the globe; to the question of whether it was to be a "Jewish state or a state for Jews?"; to the Arab Israeli conflict; to the absorption of Russian Jewry in the 1980s. This course will examine Israeli identity, society, politics and religion. It will examine the Jewish population but also the Christian and Muslim populations. Through this examination we will try to understand the role of Israel in both Jewish and Middle Eastern History. Texts include A History of Modern Israel by Howard Sachar, and The Chosen instrument: The Jewish Agency in the First Decade of the State of Israel by Ernest Stock, amongst others.

JUST 385B/COLI 331F/EDUC 580H/ENG 380E. "H", "W".

(CRN: 99613/96023/97782/91264) .

Post-Holocaust Literature. T 4:25-7:25p. Paul-William Burch. SW 324

This course examines Holocaust memoir and fiction chiefly by second-and even third-generation descendants of Shoah survivors. Readings, many of which are from the last two decades, are primarily by American, European, Australian, and Israeli writers including Melvin Bukiet, Amir Gutfreund, Henri Raczymov, Lawrence Langer, Barbara Finkelstein, Alain Finkielkraut, Thane Rosenbaum, Joseph Skibell, Art Spiegelman, Savyon Liebrecht, Lea Aini, Lily Brett, Alan Kaufman, and Aryeh Lev Stollman. Requires several short papers, mid-term examination, and final examination. Accompanied by a speaker/lecture series. Notes: prerequisite of sophomore standing;

not appropriate for first-year students. Required texts may include: Lawrence Langer, Art from the Ashes (anthology), Amir Gutfreund, Our Holocaust, Daniel Mendelsohn, The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million, Melvin Bukiet, Nothing Makes You Free (anthology), Joseph Skibell, A Blessing on the Moon, Art Spiegelman, Maus I and Maus II, Aryeh Lev Stollman, The Far Euphrates.

JUST 386M/ARAB 480A (CRN'S: 96236/99252 )

The Israeli-Arab Conflict. T 1:15-4:15. Sariel Birnbaum. FA344

The Arab Israeli conflict started in late 19th century and its end is far from sight even today. This course will offer a survey of the conflict from its earliest periods to current events, focusing on the interactions between Zionism and the National Arab movements. We will not confine our readings and discussions to the "facts" alone, but also examine myths, collective memory and what can be called "popular historiography" (in newspapers, literature, and in the cinema).

JUST480E/ARAB 386B/COLI 480I, "C", (CRN's: 99610/99612/97035)

Muslim Immigrants in European Cinema. MW 2:20-3:20p, SW 310 & W 3:30-5:30p, FA 248. Sariel Birnbaum.

In recent years, there has been a flourishing of "immigrants" in European cinema, and especially cinema made by and about Muslim immigrants. Almost every film made in a European country depicts scenes from the life of the local Muslim community. We will study about the main European countries and their Muslim immigrants: the Turkish immigrants to Germany, the North-African immigrants to France, immigrants from the Indian sub-continent to Britain. The course will include the screening of films made about and by these immigrant populations. American Cinema, or some American films, may serve as a comparison group since the American encounter with Muslim immigrants has been quite different from the European experience.

JUST 485B/COLI 480T/EDUC 580J/ENG 450G. "C", "H".

(CRN: 99636/99637./99966/97567)

Holocaust Fiction. W 4:40-7:40p, SW 324. Paul-William Burch.

Issues of memory, representation, and voice are addressed in the reading of Holocaust fiction. The class reads through the prism of the literature of witness novels and short stories—most by Holocaust survivors—including works by Appelfeld, Fink, Borowski, Grynberg, Lustig, Nomberg- Przytyk, Rawicz, Kosinski, and Wiesel. Several short papers, mid-term examination, and final examination are required. Accompanied by a speaker/lecture series. Notes: prerequisite, sophomore standing; not appropriate for first-year students. Required texts may include: Lawrence Langer, Art from the Ashes (Anthology), Piotr Rawicz, Blood from the Sky, Jerzy Kosiński, The Painted Bird, Elie Wiesel, Gates of the Forest, Hans Keilson, The Death of the Adversary, David Grossman, See Under: Love, André Schwarz-Bart, The Last of the Just.

JUST 489A.   "C", (CRN: 99748)

Jewish Non-Profit Organizations. R 1:15 – 4:15. LN 1402. Shana Kantor.

In this course, we will look at the organizations and systems that make up the Jewish community in the United States. The goal of the course is to deconstruct the concept of "community" and to understand how institutions fulfill the purposes of community. We will introduce the course by learning about the history of the Jewish communal institutions in the U.S. and how they came to create the landscape of organizations that exist today. The main part of the course will explore the rich, diverse and complex landscape of Jewish communal organizations that exist today.  We will cover many types of organizations, some emerging organizations and how they fit into the landscape of the Jewish Non-Profit world. The primary text for the course is Daniel J Elazar's Community and Polity.

CROSS-LISTED COURSES (JUDAIC STUDIES NOT PARENT):

JUST 280Q/ANTH 261. "G", "N", "W", (CRN: 93302/90852)

Archaeology of Biblical Lands.  MWF 3:30 – 4:30. S2 260. Jason Kennedy

The archaeology of Palestine (Israel, occupied territories, Jordan) has a long tradition, due largely to European and American biblical and colonial interests. Archaeological remains are important in today's Israel and the Palestinian territories especially because of potential links to the Bible. The goals of this course are to provide an overview of important archaeological fieldwork, the changing methods of research in Palestine, the role of the Biblical texts of archaeological research, and the highly politicized context in which archaeology is conducted in the region.

JUST 285B/WOMN 280D/COLI 280C/GERM 241C/CINE 285A. "A"

(CRN: 99706/ 92859/ 93896/ 99449/ 99699

Women in Holocaust Films. W 3:30 – 6:30, EB Q23, Ingeborg Majer-Osickey

Representations of Women in Holocaust Films. This course is an examination of the cinematic representations of women in the Holocaust. Students will be introduced to feminist methodologies that draw on historical and sociological knowledge as tools with which to analyze major film directors' aesthetic approaches to memorialization.

JUST 380A/COLI 380U/GERM 380P/ENG 450F. "H", "W"

(CRN: 99609/ 93447/ 96804/ 98207)

Kafka and His Readers. MW 4:40 – 6:05, LN G335, Neil C. Pages

Course explores the work and reception of Franz Kafka (1883-1924), arguably the most famous writer of German Modernism and the inspiration for the idiom "Kafkaesque." We will examine the Kafkan text with and against some of the cultural productions that have emerged from it, from the illustrations of R. Crumb, to the installation art of Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, the musical compositions of Carsten Nicolai, the films of Woody Allen, Steven Soderbergh and Michael Haneke, the literary texts of authors like Jonathan Franzen, Haruki Murakami and J.M. Coetzee and the criticism of thinkers like Adorno, Derrida and Blanchot. While considering Kafka's literary legacy, his academic function and the debates about the translation of his work, we will also reflect on the process of reading and interpretation more generally as well as on the ways in which literary criticism works.

JUST 380G/AFST 380R/WOMN 380H/SPAN 380G/HIST 381Q/SOC 380R/ MDVL 382H/COLI 380I. "W" (CRN: 99502/ 94796/ 95126/ 95455/ 95567/ 98831/ 98840/ 99476

Muslim Jews Christian Islam. TR 10:05 – 11:30, Moulay Bouanani

Andalusian society was formed by a fruitful mixture of different elements: Muslims, Jews and Christians; Arabs, Berbers, and indigenous Spaniards who developed a civilization in Spain and the Maghrib which was different in some ways from what existed in the Arab East. From the eight century until about 1200 Muslim Spain Al Andalus was the most civilized and materially advanced area of Western Europe. Ethnic and religious minorities such as Muwallads, Mozarabes enjoyed a high degree of tolerance and, like the Jews, formed prosperous and erudite communities in the cities. When the world spoke Arabic Cordoba was the most splendid city on the continent with magnificent buildings and a material prosperity unequalled elsewhere.

The Moorish culture in Spain reached its zenith under the auspices of Arab-Islamic rule that guaranteed diversity with a stable political situation allowing an unprecedented opulence. These and other circumstances engendered the efflorescence of Adab high literature,audacious philosophical treatises, Fann art, erudition and a refined living in Andalusia.

This course will examine the culture and civilization of Islamic Spain and the contribution of each of the ethnicities and followers of each religion to its greatness.

Format: Two one hour and twenty five minute class meetings. Regular attendance and oral presentations. Grading based on in-class performance and participation, on papers (response and term papers). There is a requirement of slightly more pages for those taking the course to fulfill a writing requirement.

Prerequisites: None

Books: To be determined

JUST 386B/PLSC 389N. (CRN: 99581/ 94313)

Government and Politics in Israel. TR 1:15 – 2:40, AA G019. Moaz Rosenthal

The institutional setting that defines the rules of the political game in Israel is complicated, mostly unstructured, based on many veto players and agenda setters, showing a constant conflict between the dynamics of change and stagnation. The players in this setting (individuals and organizations alike) maneuver within political, social and economic crises, while trying to mitigate a society characterized with overlapping and cross-cutting cleavages. Using the conceptual toolbox brought forth by rational-choice institutionalism, this course studies the players interacting in the Israeli case (voters, activists, party elites, parties, members of Knesset and their factions, government ministers, premiers and judges) and the rules of the game that guide them (historical traditions, social identities, the basic laws and the electoral method). This analysis uses rational-choice institutionalism concepts, comparative data and in-depth empirical study (qualitative and quantitative) of the Israeli case. That analysis will show that the Israeli case should be included in the comparative analysis of polities as whole and democratic polities in particular.

JUST 411/ PHIL 411A/ PHIL 640M. "C", "H". (CRN: 99925/ 92378/ 93606

Advanced Topics – Philosophy of Religion. W 1:40 – 4:40. LN 1402. Randy Friedman.

This course focuses on the work of the American Philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson, and includes a close reading of some modern interpreters of his work, including Stanley Cavell.

It is easy to be distracted by the many debates surrounding Emerson. Is he a secularist? Is he a democrat? What is Emerson's place in a possible genealogy of American thought? And, does he have a future? In the two most well known genealogies of American philosophy, Kuklick and West, Emerson does not fare well. Kuklick ignores Emerson; and West takes him to task for founding a tradition which avoids "epistemology-centered philosophy". In Emerson, I find an anti-dogmatic, pluralistic, and 'tough-minded' approach to religion which deeply influences both James and Dewey's philosophies of religion. I want to understand how Emerson translates traditional religious and philosophical categories, and to explore what is involved in his "naturalistic metaphysics."In short, I want to read Emerson as a philosopher of religion. By asking these questions, I place myself in a line of interpretation which includes Russell Goodman, David Jacobson, Charles Mitchell, and Stanley Cavell, all of whom read Emerson philosophically, engaging his ideas, and folding them into a discussion of the progression of classical American philosophy. Simultaneously taught as PHIL 411A/PHIL 640M.

HEBREW

HEBR 102. (CRN: 10404)

Hebrew II MTWRF 8:30-9:30. SW 326. Orly Shoer

Second semester of the communicative introduction to the language and its culture. Provides a thorough grounding in reading, writing, grammar, oral comprehension, and speaking. Prerequisites: HEBR 101 with a grade of C- or equivalent or permission of instructor.

HEBR 204. (CRN: 96170)

Intermediate Hebrew II. MWF 9:40-10:40.   RC 203 Orly Shoer

Intermediate-level language and culture course with emphasis on the reading of literary and non-literary texts, grammar and writing. Prerequisite: HEBR 103 with a grade of C- or equivalent or permission of instructor.

HEBR 312. (CRN: 99596)

Texts and Conversations.   MWF 10:50-11:50. FA 242. Orly Shoer.

In this course students will advance their Hebrew language skills through reading, discussing and writing about a variety of short fiction and nonfiction texts and visual material. Writing practice and reviewing of grammar will be incorporated through the presented materials. Taught in Hebrew. Prerequisites: HEBR 204 with a grade of C- or equivalent or permission of instructor.

YIDDISH

YIDD 102. CRN: 95969

Yiddish II. MWF 10:50-11:50. SW 324. Gina Glasman.

Second semester of the communicative introduction to the language and its culture. Provides a thorough grounding in reading, writing, grammar, oral comprehension, and speaking. Prerequisites: YIDD 101 with a grade of C- or equivalent or permission of instructor.

YIDD 297. CRN: 99984

Independent Study. Gina Glasman


 

FALL 2011 CURRICULUM (click for .pdf)

The Judaic Studies department offers courses under three subheadings: Judaic Studies, Hebrew, and Yiddish.

JUDAIC STUDIES COURSES

HARP 101: What Do We Know about God in Jewish Philosophy? RANDY FRIEDMAN

HARP 101 is a two-credit seminar course for incoming freshman students in Harpur College on an interesting course topic that will also assist new student with their transition to the University. Students will be involved in discussions with a small group of other new students, faculty, and staff member on a specific topic of interest. This freshmen seminar will explore an intriguing intellectual topic, help Harpur freshmen hone critical thinking and writing skills, and assist students in making a successful transition to university life. This course will examine central theological questions in Jewish philosophy: what can and do we know about God? In addition to exploring theology in terms of philosophy, we will also examine broader methodological questions about how religion and religious texts are studied in a university. For more information, see the Harpur Schedule of Classes.

* JUST 180A PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION. TR. 10:50-11:30. RANDY FRIEDMAN

This course originates in Philosophy and is cross-listed with Judaic Studies. This introductory course will explore the many philosophical and methodological questions which emerge from the study of religious thought. Topics will include the nature of religious subjectivity, divinity, prayer, sacrifice, and faith. We will study some central biblical stories and narratives and literary, philosophical, and theological responses to them. Students will practice techniques of textual exegesis and directly engage texts. In addition to the content of this course, students will practice the process skills of reading and writing critically. Students will be expected to read the texts carefully and to come to class prepared to ask and answer questions. The course will require approximately 75 pages of reading each week.

* JUST 244 MODERN JEWISH HISTORY. TR 1:15-2:40p. ARKUSH

This course surveys Jewish history from the beginning of the Jewish Enlightenment in the middle of the eighteenth century to the establishment of a Jewish state in the middle of the twentieth. Along the way, it shows how Jews sought to forge new religious, cultural and national identities in the face of such divergent modern challenges as national citizenship and the rise of racial and political anti‐semitism. The course culminates in a discussion of the Holocaust and the creation of the State of Israel, locating these major events within the broad framework of modern Western and modern Jewish history as a whole. Much attention is given to the involvement of Jewish intellectuals in such important movements as e.g. secularism, socialism and nationalism, and newly established social strata of Jewish society such as proletariat and intelligentsia.

* JUST 284A JEWISH MEDICAL ETHICS: MATTERS OF LIFE AND DEATH. TR 10:05-11:30. RIVKA SLONIM

This course offers students an in-depth yet introductory exploration of issues pertaining to life and death as these are discussed in Jewish law and philosophy. In the main, the course focuses on Jewish approaches to bio-ethical dilemmas that arise around the beginning and end of life. The remainder provides background information meant to provide the student with an appreciation of the philosophy in which the legal discussions are grounded. Through the study of primary Jewish sources - Biblical, Talmudic, and Rabbinic, both past and present - students will explore the the Jewish legal decisions and the philosophical reasoning that drives them. They will analyze the ways in which this system both intersects and diverges from the four classic principles of Western medical ethics: autonomy, justice, non-maleficence and beneficence.

* JUST 287A MIDDLE EASTERN SOCIETIES IN CINEMATIC TRANSITION: ISRAEL AND EGYPT. TR 2:50-4:15p. SARIEL BIRNBAUM

This course will examine the intriguing cinema industries of two neighboring Middle Eastern countries - Israel and Egypt. The course will focus on cinematic changes and their relation to changes in society and politics. Among the foci of the courses will be historical films (films that represent a historical period to an audience removed in time from it), the representation of the "other" in the films of each country, and the meaning of the "East" that the films of each society convey.

* JUST 289A COMPARATIVE JEWISH INSTITUTIONS TR 1:15-2:40. JOSEPH HODES

This course will examine some of the religious, legal, charitable, social and educational institutions that Jews have established. It will provide a historical overview of these institutions to chart their development and will show how each institution is influenced by the local Jewish culture. The course will emphasize world Jewry comparing institutions in American, Europe, North Africa and Asia, attempting to show how the institutions are both common to Judaism and unique to the local community. Through primary and secondary readings students will research the foundations of these institutions and how they developed differently throughout the Jewish world.

* JUST 342 BETWEEN PERSIANS AND ISLAM. TR 8:30-9:55. ALLAN ARKUSH

This course will focus on the history and culture of the Jews from the sixth century B.C.E. to the seventh century C.E. It will concentrate on developments in the Jews’ homeland as well as in the far-flung communities of the Diaspora. Topics will include: the Maccabean revolt, the Dead Sea Scrolls, the emergence of Christianity out of Judaism, the Jewish rebellions against Rome, ancient anti-semitism, and the rise of rabbinic Judaism. Books will include: The Jerusalem Bible (including both testaments and apocryphal writings), Diaspora: Jews amidst Greeks and Romans, Erich Gruen Rome and Jerusalem, Martin Goodman, Texts and Traditions, Lawrence Schiffman.

Note: For current majors and minors, JUST 342 will be counted as equiv to JUST 242 2nd Temple.

* JUST 344 RENAISSANCE AND EARLY MODERN JEWISH HISTORY. M 5:50- 8:50. JOE HODES.

This course is devoted to the comparative history of Jewish experience in early modern world, and focuses on the period between 15th and 18th centuries. We will discuss the social, religious, cultural and economic history of the Jews in Christian Europe, Islamic countries, and also European colonies in North America and elsewhere. Much attention will be given to the new Jewish communities that did not play a larger role in the ancient and medieval periods, especially in Ottoman Empire, Eastern Europe. Most importantly the class will explore the unique experience of Sephardic Jews, many among them of Converso (Marrano) background, and their participation in European colonization of the East and the New World.

Note: For current majors and minors, JUST 344 will be counted as equiv to JUST 243 Medieval

* JUST 345 THE HOLOCAUST. MW 1420 – 1520. WULF KANSTEINER

This course originates in History. It is cross-listed in Judaic Studies. It offers a study of the extermination of the Jews by the Nazis and their allies during World War II including an examination of Jewish responses and resistance to the Nazis, as well as post-war attempts to understand the Holocaust. Thematic emphasis may vary.

* JUST 380A EXILE LITERATURE. MW 3:30-4:55p. NEIL CHRISTIAN PAGES

This course originates in Comparative Literature. It is cross-listed with Judaic Studies. The course explores the work of writers, artists and intellectuals who fled Nazi Germany and established lives and careers in exile. Course themes include the problem of political and cultural resistance, the loss of the mother tongue, exile as metaphor, the Jewish-German experience, exiles in Hollywood, and the lasting legacy of German exiles in the United States. Texts include works by Thomas Mann, Klaus Mann, Bertolt Brecht, Mascha Kaléko, Anna Seghers, Joseph Roth, Hans Erich Nossack, Paul Celan, W.G. Sebald, and Hannah Arendt.

* JUST 384A MODERN MIDRASH. TR. 11:40-1:05P. TZIONA SZAJMAN

This course explores techniques and skills for reading the Bible and creating modern midrash. Students will learn about traditional and modern midrash, a unique form of literature that builds on gaps in the Bible to create new meaning.

* JUST 384B WRITING ABOUT THE FAMILY. TR 1140 – 1305.  L. Rosenberg

* JUST 385A LITERARY RESPONSES TO THE HOLOCAUST. T 4:25-7:25P. PAUL BURCH

This course examines the literary responses to the Holocaust, the Shoah, including diaries, journals, memoirs, and poetry. Our work will be informed by the notion that literary responses to the Holocaust are, as Carolyn Forché has written, in themselves "material evidence of that-which-occurred." Readings and discussions address such issues as the evidentiary nature of literary responses to the Shoah, the problem of representation, and the literary commodification of the Holocaust. Readings will include works by Lawrence Langer. Jankiel Wiernik, Elie Wiesel, Primo Levi, Jean Améry, Paul Celan, Dan Pagis, Ruth Kluger, Robert Melson, Anne Frank, and others. Accompanied by a speaker/lecture series. Requires several short papers, mid-term exam, and final examination. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. THIS COURSE IS NOT APPROPRIATE FOR FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.

* JUST 386B GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS IN ISRAEL. MWF 8:30-9:30. MAOZ ROSENTHAL

This course originates in Political Science and is cross-listed with Judaic Studies. This course examines Israeli government and politics. The institutional setting that defines the rules of the political game in Israel is complicated, mostly unstructured, based on many veto players and agenda setters, showing a constant conflict between the dynamics of change and stagnation. The players in this setting (individuals and organizations alike) maneuver within political, social and economic crises, while trying to mitigate a society characterized with overlapping and cross-cutting cleavages. Using the conceptual toolbox brought forth by rational-choice institutionalism, this course studies the players interacting in the Israeli case (voters, activists, party elites, parties, members of Knesset and their factions, government ministers, premiers and judges) and the rules of the game that guide them (historical traditions, social identities, the basic laws and the electoral method). This analysis uses rational-choice institutionalism concepts, comparative data and in-depth empirical study (qualitative and quantitative) of the Israeli case. That analysis will show that the Israeli case should be included in the comparative analysis of polities as whole and democratic polities in particular.

* JUST 389B PUBLIC OPINION. TR 1:15-2:40P. JONATHAN KRASNO.

This course originates in Political Science and is cross-listed with Judaic Studies. This course investigates the interrelation of policy processes and opinion. It introduces basic tools of measurement, a critical examination of concepts, and a practical experience in survey research design and execution. Prerequisite: PLSC 111.

* JUST 484A SYNAGOGUE AND STATE. W 1:40-4:40P. ALLAN ARKUSH

This course explores diverse Jewish understandings of the relationship between religion and politics. It begins with an examination of the biblical and post-biblical articulations of a fundamentally theocratic outlook. It proceeds with an examination of the way in which a number of modern Jewish thinkers, including Moses Mendelssohn in the eighteenth century and David Novak in the twenty-first century, have sought to provide a theoretical justification for separating Judaism from the political sphere. The course will conclude with a study of the relationship between the Jewish religion and the state in the United States and Israel.

Books will include: The Jewish Political Tradition, edited by Michael Walzer, Jerusalem, Moses Mendelssohn, The Jewish Social Contract, David Novak, Religion and State in the American Jewish Experience, Jonathan Sarna, Israel’s Higher Law, Steven Mazie

* JUST 484B BUBER AND HIS JEWISH CRITICS M 1:40-4:40P RANDY FRIEDMAN

This reading intensive seminar will explore the philosophical and theological writings of Martin Buber. Buber is often categorized as an important modern Jewish thinker, and more often overlooked as a serious philosopher. This course will attempt to read Buber back into the canon of Western philosophy, by placing him in conversation with his philosophical predecessors and contemporaries. We will also examine Buber’s critique of philosophy, generally, through a close reading of his dialogical philosophy. The course will also study Buber in relation to two of his most important interlocutors, Gershom Scholem and Franz Rosenzweig. The work of Emmanuel Levinas, Gabriel Marcel, and Joseph Soloveitchik will also be discussed. Topics will include the basics of philosophy of religion: the conception of God, revelation, law and commandment, and moral philosophy. We will also examine Buber’s political writings on Zionism.

* JUST 484C CINEMATIC IMAGES OF JEWS AND ISRAELIS. TR 6-7p, T 7:20-9:20p. SARIEL BIRNBAUM

This courses meets for lecture and discussion on TR 6-7p and for film screening on T 7:20-9:20. Film screenings and discussion are open to the public.

In this course we will discuss some of the images of Jews, including Israeli Jews, in some of the most influential cinema industries around the world. Some visual and audio images of Jews from classic anti-semitic sources will be studied for the purpose of comparison with modern films. Another focal point will be the Arab cinema. When the Egyptian cinematic industry appeared, many Jews took an important part in all areas of the cinematic productions. Later, in the 1950s and 1960s, several anti-semitic films were made. In contemporary Arab films, namely 1990s and 2000s, anti-semitic themes became rare and we will discuss these changes. The films we will view will include films from Egypt, France, Nazi Germany, as well as some Yiddish and Israeli films. The primary text used in the course is Omer Bartov's The "Jew" in Cinema: From The Golem to Don't Touch My Holocaust (Indiana University, 2005).

* JUST 485A HOLOCAUST LITERATURE. W 4:40-7:40P. PAUL BURCH

Students in this course read fiction written primarily by Holocaust survivors in the context of the literature of witness. The course addresses issues of memory, representation, and voice in Holocaust fiction. Readings include works by Appelfeld, Fink, Borowski, Grynberg, Lustig, Nomberg-Przytyk, Rawocz, Kosinski, Wiesel and others. Requires several short papers, mid-term exam, and final examination. Accompanied by a speaker/lecture series. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. THIS COURSE IS NOT APPROPRIATE FOR FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS.

* JUST 486B PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND POLICY IN ISRAEL. W 1:40-4:40. MAOZ ROSENTHAL

This course originates in Political Science and is cross-listed with Judaic Studies. This course examines public administration and policy in Israel. Despite impressive achievements in terms of economic growth, low unemployment and continuous prosperity, Israel's political-administrative system has shown on-going weakness in policy design and implementation. This is manifested through elected governments being replaced every two years on average, decreasing levels of popular support for the government and its organizations, increasing level of delegation of authorities from elected politicians to bureaucrats and implementation of policies mostly if the bureaucrats desire them. The actual effect of all these factors is the lack of governments' ability to design and implement policies recognized as critical by Israel's political mainstream regarding social inequality, structural reforms and the Arab-Israeli conflict. We will study the Israeli case using empirical findings from comparative research regarding the interaction between politicians and bureaucrats, analytical models brought forth by public choice theory as well as qualitative and quantitative datasets retrieved from Israel's public sector. We will then present and discuss a claim that Israel's crisis of governance is in essence equilibrium, stemming from the variance in the levels of accountability of Israeli politicians and the variance in determination of Israeli bureaucrats.

 

HEBREW COURSES

* HEBR 101 HEBREW I. MTWRF 8:30-9:30. ORLY SHOER

This course has two sections one taught by Mirit Hadar and the other by Orly Shoer. Both sections meet at 8:30 to 9:30 M through F. This course offers a communicative introduction to the Hebrew language and its culture. It provides a thorough grounding in reading, writing, grammar, oral comprehension, and speaking. It is intended for beginners. No prerequisites.

* HEBR 203 HEBREW III. MWF 9:40-10:40. ORLY SHOER

This course offers the final semester of a communicative introduction to the Hebrew language and its culture. It facilitates the continued development of reading, writing, grammar, oral comprehension, and speaking skills. Prerequisite: HEBR 102 with a grade of C- or equivalent.

HEBR 203 is the last course needed to use Hebrew to fulfill the Binghamton University’s foreign language requirement.

* HEBR 331 CURRENT AFFAIRS. TR 10:05:11:30. ORLY SHOER

This course is an advanced-intermediate Hebrew language and culture course with an emphasis on the development of fluency in oral and written expression through discussion and frequent writing about a variety of topics of current interest including music, film, science, society, and politics. Taught in Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 204 with a grade of C- or equivalent or permission of instructor.

 

YIDDISH COURSES

* YIDD 101 YIDDISH I. MWF 10:50-11:50. GINA GLASSMAN

This course offers a communicative introduction to the Yiddish language and its culture. It provides a thorough grounding in reading, writing, grammar, oral comprehension, and speaking. It is intended for beginners. No prerequisites.

* YIDD 203 YIDDISH III. TR 11:40-13:05. GINA GLASMAN

This course offers the final semester of a communicative introduction to the Yiddish language and its culture. It facilitates the continued development of reading, writing, grammar, oral comprehension, and speaking skills. Prerequisite: HEBR 102 with a grade of C- or equivalent.

YIDD 203 is the last course needed to use Yiddish in order to fulfill the Binghamton University’s foreign language requirement.

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Last Updated: 11/17/14