authors & editors

Fall 2011

John Elvis Smelcer, PhD ’11
John Elvis Smelcer, PhD ’11
Alaskan: Stories from the Great Land
Standing Stone Studios, 2011

Written over the course of a quarter century, these two dozen stories embody the spirit of Alaska — its history, headlines and experiences. Smelcer, who has been called “Alaska’s modern day Jack London” by W.P. Kinsella, author of Field of Dreams, writes about Alaska’s colliding cultures, its magnificent beauty and its dangerously unforgiving environment.

 
Carol Faulkner, MA ’95, PhD ’98
Carol Faulkner, MA ’95, PhD ’98
Lucretia Mott’s Heresy: Abolition and Women’s Rights in Nineteenth-Century America
University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011

Lucretia Coffin Mott has often been depicted as a mother figure, but her outspoken challenges to authority riled ministers, journalists, politicians and her fellow Quakers. In the first biography of Mott in 30 years, Faulkner, associate professor of history at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, reveals the motivations of this radical egalitarian.

 
Diana Abu-Jaber, PhD ’86
Diana Abu-Jaber, PhD ’86
Birds of Paradise
W.W. Norton, 2011

This novel centers on a family that comes apart at the seams but finds its way back together. Avis and Brian Muir are haunted by the disappearance of their daughter, Felice, who ran away at the age of 13. She has spent five years modeling tattoos, skateboarding, partying at clubs and sleeping in a squat house or on the beach. About to turn 18, Felice must come face to face with the secret that drove her away from her loving family.

 
Michael LaSala ’81
Michael LaSala ’81
Coming Out, Coming Home: Helping Families Adjust to a Gay or Lesbian Child
Columbia University Press, 2010

The discovery that a child is gay or lesbian can send shockwaves through a family. Through a multicultural study of 65 families, Michael LaSala outlines effective interventions for families in transition. His research shows surprising outcomes, such as improved familial relationships, including father–child relationships, even if a parent reacts negatively to the revelation.