authors & editors

Spring 2013

Olivia Chadha, PhD ’09
Olivia Chadha, PhD ’09
Balance of Fragile Things
Byte Level Research, 2012

The novel centers on a family of first-generation immigrants in upstate New York, trying to fit in while longing for their homeland. As they encounter obstacles to success in school and work, the members of this family must find a way to come closer together. Publishers Weekly describes Chadha’s work as “a delightful intrigue, with strong characters who develop and grow throughout the book as they face frightening turns.”

 
Faith Rogow, MA ’83, PhD ’89 (with Cyndy Scheibe)
Faith Rogow, MA ’83, PhD ’89 (with Cyndy Scheibe)
The Teacher’s Guide to Media Literacy
Corwin, 2012

These days, it seems that everyone is a creator of some sort of media. With so much content available at any point in time, how can young people differentiate what’s good and what should be ignored? Rogow, a founding president of the National Association for Media Literacy, and her co-author provide a resource for teachers wanting to impart critical-thinking skills to students.

 
Simon J. Bronner ’74
Simon J. Bronner ’74
Campus Traditions: Folklore from the Old-Time College to the Modern Mega University
University Press of Mississippi, 2012

Regardless of where or when young adults attend college, all share a common experience: a coming of age, when they learn to work through the challenges of growing up. The folkloric material students create, stemming from their intense need to belong, eventually lives on through campus traditions. Bronner looks at how campus life is shaped by students and, at the same time, shapes them.

 
Camille Paglia ’68
Camille Paglia ’68
Glittering Images: A Journey Through Art from Egypt to Star Wars
Pantheon Books, 2012

The acclaimed cultural critic challenges the way we think about our visual environment by taking us on a tour of Western art’s defining moments, from Egyptian Queen Nefertari’s tomb to George Lucas’ volcano planet duel in Revenge of the Sith. She examines more than two dozen images of art — some famous, some not — within their historical contexts, before concluding that avant-garde is dead and that digital pioneer Lucas is the world’s greatest living artist.