authors & editors

Spring 2014

Patti Breitman ‘76 et al.
Patti Breitman ‘76 et al.
Never Too Late to Go Vegan: The Over-50 Guide to Adopting and Thriving On a Plant-Based Diet
(The Experiment, 2014 )

Discover the benefits of a plant-rich diet and how to begin this way of eating. The book includes 75 easy recipes.

 
David Kalish ’83
David Kalish ’83
The Opposite of Everything
(WiDo Publishing, 2014)

Loosely based on the author’s painful past, the novel traces the riotous Job-like descent of a Brooklyn journalist stricken with cancer, divorce and an overbearing father, and the contrarian strategy he uses to reinvent himself.

 
Jemil Metti, MA ’77
Jemil Metti, MA ’77
The Pahlavi Sword
(CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013)

The novel takes place during the reign of Shah Reza Pahlavi, whose glamorous regime masked the rule of terror he held over the population of Iran.

 
Gary Grieve-Carlson, MA ’80
Gary Grieve-Carlson, MA ’80
Poems Containing History: Twentieth-Century American Poetry’s Engagement with the Past
(Lexington Books, 2013)

Poetry helps its readers to think about history in provocative and powerful ways.

 

Fall 2013

Mark Cohen ’81
Mark Cohen ’81
Overweight Sensation: The Life and Comedy of Allan Sherman
Brandeis, 2013

Mark Cohen’s contribution to an American Jewish historical and cultural series is the first biography of the maniacal and creative song parodist whose success in the early 1960s signaled that the age of assimilation was over and a new age of ethnic pride had begun. Eric Alterman, columnist for The Nation, calls Overweight Sensation “a remarkably well-researched, passionately written story of quite nearly tragic proportions.”

 
Dean Porter ’61, MA ’66, PhD ’74 et al.
Dean Porter ’61, MA ’66, PhD ’74 et al.
Nicolai Fechin
Palace Editions, 2013

Dean Porter was co-curator of the art exhibition Nicolai Fechin: From Kazan to Taos, produced by the Foundation for International Arts & Education and shown in the United States and Russia. In addition, Porter was a contributor to the art catalog published in conjunction with the Fechin exhibition.

 
John Owens ’76
John Owens ’76
Confessions of a Bad Teacher
Sourcebooks, 2013

John Owens says his English degree from Binghamton helped him become successful in magazine publishing. To give back, he decided to teach English in South Bronx. This wound up being a learning experience for him — one in which he says he discovered a very real and frightening war in American public education.

 
Brian Resnick ’96
Brian Resnick ’96
Designing B2B Brands: Lessons from Deloitte and 195,000 Brand Managers
Wiley, 2013

As branding becomes increasingly important to business success, an unprecedented number of professionals are playing a role in shaping a company’s brand and are counted on to understand how to consistently produce high-quality work. Brian Resnick’s book is a comprehensive manual outlining the steps needed to create an iconic global identity.

 

Summer 2013

Deborah Tannen ’66, with Anna Marie Trester
Deborah Tannen ’66, with Anna Marie Trester
Discourse 2.0: Language and New Media
Georgetown University Press, 2013

Education and communication are increasingly experienced through electronic media, including Facebook, Twitter, blogging and the like, altering our daily interactions with others. In Discourse 2.0: Language and New Media, Tannen and her co-editor, with the help of top scholars, work to discover the role of English on the
Internet and observe how language is used and created by these new media outlets.

 
Justin R. Garcia ’07, MS ’09, PhD ’12, with Peter B. Gray
Justin R. Garcia ’07, MS ’09, PhD ’12, with Peter B. Gray
Evolution & Human Sexual Behavior
Harvard University Press, 2013

Sexual practices and customs that we take for granted, such as the need for clothing and privacy, might be looked upon as strange by others outside our species. Evolution & Human Sexual Behavior is a thought-provoking experiment that examines human sex practices from the point of view of our primate counterpart, the chimpanzee. Garcia and his co-author detail the biological and behavioral process that occurs when sexual emotions are aroused and document the evolution of human sexuality.

 
Amy Brill ’92
Amy Brill ’92
The Movement of Stars
Riverhead Press, 2013

Inspired by the true work of Maria Mitchell, the first professional female astronomer in America, The Movement of Stars takes place in 1845 and follows Nantucket Quaker Hannah Gardner Price, who grows up in a community where a woman’s duty is marriage and motherhood. Yet, in the privacy of her rooftop, Hannah dreams of discovering a comet. Drawn to the young and ambitious Isaac Martin, who shares her love of stars, Hannah becomes his teacher and, through their relationship, learns about the meaning of work and love.

 
Stephanie (Fiato) Monahan ’00
Stephanie (Fiato) Monahan ’00
33 Valentines
Entangled Edge, 2013

Although it is the shortest month, February means nothing but trouble for Sophie, who desires a year without the dreaded month and definitely a year without Valentine’s Day. Finally, she pledges to make a change, starting with revealing her true feelings to her best friend, Sam. With some misfortune and wild family surprises, Sophie has a harder time turning her life around than she anticipated.

 

Spring 2013

Camille Paglia ’68
Camille Paglia ’68
Glittering Images: A Journey Through Art from Egypt to Star Wars
Pantheon Books, 2012

The acclaimed cultural critic challenges the way we think about our visual environment by taking us on a tour of Western art’s defining moments, from Egyptian Queen Nefertari’s tomb to George Lucas’ volcano planet duel in Revenge of the Sith. She examines more than two dozen images of art — some famous, some not — within their historical contexts, before concluding that avant-garde is dead and that digital pioneer Lucas is the world’s greatest living artist.

 
Olivia Chadha, PhD ’09
Olivia Chadha, PhD ’09
Balance of Fragile Things
Byte Level Research, 2012

The novel centers on a family of first-generation immigrants in upstate New York, trying to fit in while longing for their homeland. As they encounter obstacles to success in school and work, the members of this family must find a way to come closer together. Publishers Weekly describes Chadha’s work as “a delightful intrigue, with strong characters who develop and grow throughout the book as they face frightening turns.”

 
Faith Rogow, MA ’83, PhD ’89 (with Cyndy Scheibe)
Faith Rogow, MA ’83, PhD ’89 (with Cyndy Scheibe)
The Teacher’s Guide to Media Literacy
Corwin, 2012

These days, it seems that everyone is a creator of some sort of media. With so much content available at any point in time, how can young people differentiate what’s good and what should be ignored? Rogow, a founding president of the National Association for Media Literacy, and her co-author provide a resource for teachers wanting to impart critical-thinking skills to students.

 
Simon J. Bronner ’74
Simon J. Bronner ’74
Campus Traditions: Folklore from the Old-Time College to the Modern Mega University
University Press of Mississippi, 2012

Regardless of where or when young adults attend college, all share a common experience: a coming of age, when they learn to work through the challenges of growing up. The folkloric material students create, stemming from their intense need to belong, eventually lives on through campus traditions. Bronner looks at how campus life is shaped by students and, at the same time, shapes them.

 

Fall 2012

Patricia Barnes-Svarney, MA ’83
Patricia Barnes-Svarney, MA ’83
Why Do Women Crave More Sex in the Summer? 112 Questions That Women Keep Asking — and That Keep Everyone Else Guessing
NAL/Penguin, 2012

To answer some fundamental questions about what makes a woman a woman, Barnes-Svarney offers a fun, fact-filled tour of women’s bodies, sex, brains and emotions. She has been a science, science-fiction and humor writer for more than two decades, with hundreds of magazine articles, book and encyclopedia entries, and close to three dozen books published.

 
Elan Barnehama ’78
Elan Barnehama ’78
Finding Bluefield
Bold Strokes Books, 2012

Protagonist Barbara Phillips is a medical resident who is content to hide out in a small Virginia town. Life changes for Barbara when she enters Nicky’s Diner and — against her better judgment — falls in love.

 
Mitch Pearlstein ’70
Mitch Pearlstein ’70
From Family Collapse to America’s Decline: The Educational, Economic, and Social Costs of Family Fragmentation
R&L Education, 2011

Pearlstein, founder and president of the Center of the American Experiment, writes that high rates of family fragmentation in the United States hinder learning in large numbers of students. This damages the country economically by making Americans less competitive in the worldwide marketplace. Harvard University’s Paul Peterson says that not since the 1965 Moynihan Report has anyone written about the “devastating social consequences of single-parent families” so “frankly, so soberly, so reasonably or so persuasively.”

 
Seth Kaufman ’85
Seth Kaufman ’85
The King of Pain
Sukuma Books, 2012

Kaufman’s first novel centers on Rick Salter, the mind behind an outrageous reality TV show about torture. On a Saturday morning, he wakes up trapped underneath his larger-than-life home entertainment system, clueless as to how he got there. It will be a long and painful 48 hours until his housekeeper can come to the rescue.
Kaufman has been a reporter for Page Six of the New York Post and editorial director of TVGuide.com.

 

Bonnie J. Morris, MA ‘85, PhD ‘90
Bonnie J. Morris, MA ‘85, PhD ‘90
Women's History for Beginners
For Beginners LLC, 2012

Morris, who teaches women’s studies at George Washington University and Georgetown University, opens the book examining why women’s history is largely absent from the educational system. Her book serves as a reminder that there are many different versions of women’s history, each worthy of being brought to light.

 
James F. Miskal, MA ‘71, PhD ‘77 (co-author with P.H. Liotta)
James F. Miskal, MA ‘71, PhD ‘77 (co-author with P.H. Liotta)
The Real Population Bomb
Potomac Books, 2012

By 2025, almost 30 cities will have populations greater than 10 million, while more than 600 cities will have populations exceeding 1 million. These megacities are posing — and will continue to pose — serious challenges to international stability, human safety and the quality of the environment. Miskel is a consultant who has served two presidents as director of defense policy and arms control on the National Security Council.

 
Debbie Koenig ‘87
Debbie Koenig ‘87
Parents Need to Eat Too
William Morrow/HarperCollins, 2012

As Koenig would tell it, she passed on writing the next great American novel and, instead, wrote a cookbook. She spent 15 years in the book publishing industry, marketing the works of other authors before deciding she wanted to try something else. Ten years later, life came full circle and she was back in publishing — only this time her own work is in print.

 
Howard Steven Friedman ‘93
Howard Steven Friedman ‘93
The Measure of a Nation
Prometheus Books, 2012

Friedman is a leading statistician and health economist for the United Nations and a professor of professional practice at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. His work provides an assessment of how the United States compares to other affluent democracies in terms of health, safety, education and democracy.