Fall 2013

Metro New York chapter has big plans for alumni
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Metro New York chapter has big plans for alumni

When Adam Zahn ’10 tells people he went to Binghamton, that opens introductions to other alumni and friends of Binghamton graduates. The aspiring lawyer says this networking has helped his career development in the three years since he left campus.

“I now have two mentors in my interested profession who have guided me in picking the right school, the right internship, and keeping my head on straight during the most stressful days,” Zahn says.

The Alumni Association’s revived Metro New York Chapter could help write more success stories. In the summer, about 250 alumni helped relaunch the chapter at an event in Manhattan. The chapter’s steering committee is planning diverse events — cultural, athletic, industry-specific networking — to build stronger connections among the 45,000-plus alumni who live in the region.

“When most schools do alumni outreach, they come with their hands open,” says Rory Clark ’05, chapter co-leader. “Our chapter is coming to our alumni base with our hands full, in the form of social and business events, networking opportunities as well as the natural affinity to be connected to Binghamton. As a real estate broker and consultant, where my business is connecting people, I truly get how important the networking aspect is.”

Geraldine Toussaint ’08, who serves on the Alumni Association board and co-leads the Metro New York Chapter with Clark and Dan Cherico ’08, says the chapter should also help alumni to become more engaged with the University.

“While we place a very high priority on creating opportunities for alumni to reconnect with each other, we also are focused on getting alumni involved in volunteer opportunities — anything that matches their talents and interests as well as the limited time they have available outside of work,” Toussaint says.

In photo, above: From left are Marjorie Salas, Lisa Staccone, Rob Gallina and Rachel Davidson, all ‘04.

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Alumni Association

Summer 2013

Leaders conference informs and inspires alumni
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Leaders conference informs and inspires alumni

More than 200 alumni returned to campus this spring to show pride in their Binghamton roots and commit to being involved in the University’s future. At the Alumni Association’s inaugural Alumni Leaders Conference, some of the University’s most actively engaged graduates learned about issues that are critical to the University’s continued growth and how they can play a role in making Binghamton the premier public university of the 21st century.

“There was so much I learned about myself at Binghamton, and I took that into the real world,” says Geraldine Toussaint ’08. “I appreciate that so much that I have to stay involved. I owe it to students to share my experiences with them and help them. I tell them ‘I’ve been where you are, this is where I am now, and you can do it too.’”

Toussaint is an admissions and career development volunteer, is active with the Metro New York Chapter and was recently elected to the Alumni Association board.

“For me, it has been amazing to see the progression at Binghamton University,” says Justin Joseph ’05, MBA ’06. “From when I started in 2002 to now, 2013, there have been so many changes. There’s a pride that I have. I want my school to be the top public school in the country. My involvement, whatever it can be — time, money or mentoring students — can help the University get to the next level. One person can’t do it; together we can all make a difference.”

Joseph is active in planning TAU alumni events.

During the conference, the Alumni Associated awarded Medals of Distinguished Service to 12 alumni, recognizing them for their volunteer efforts on behalf of the University and notable accomplishments in their respective careers. They are:

Richard L. Alpern, Esq. ’69

Jenny N. Barbee ’07, MS ’09

Daniel R. Black ’94

Elizabeth Kay Boland ’79, MS ’82

Bruce Cameron, MAT ’88

Howard B. Eisen ’87

Carl T. Ernstrom ’61

Dr. Joseph M. Kolly ’88

Elaine M. Miller, MA ’83

Donald A. Mones ’85

Hugo J. J. Uyttenhove, MS ’75, PhD ’78

Virginia P. Walker, MSW ’12.

Additionally, three others received distinguished alumni awards (pictured above, from left to right). They are:

Sheldon Goldfarb ’73, who says Binghamton University made him more confident and competent, positioning him well for a career as a financial services lawyer. He is the general counsel for RBS Americas and chief legal officer for its consumer bank, RBS Citizens Financial Group. For his professional accomplishments and longtime support of the University, he received the 2013 Glenn G. Bartle Distinguished Alumnus Award.

Donna Lupardo, MA ’83, who finds public service rewarding and says she gets a great deal of satisfaction knowing she tried to change things for the better. Recognizing the impact she has made on the local and campus communities, the Alumni Association presented her with the 2013 Edward Weisband Distinguished Alumna Award for Public Service or Contribution to Public Affairs.

Motivational speaker Arel Moodie ’05, who is less concerned about making money than about making a positive impact on humankind. Moodie wrote the book Your Starting Point for Student Success, and his trademark is telling young people “you are awesome.” The Alumni Association honored his work by presenting him with the 2013 Lois B. DeFleur Young Alumnus Award.

Interested in being a volunteer?

There are many ways to stay connected to Binghamton, and being an alumni volunteer lets you help students while supporting the University. Opportunities for volunteers include:

— leading alumni chapters

— counseling prospective students

— offering internships

— talking to students about your profession

— participating in skill-building events such as career nights and etiquette dinners

 

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Become an alumni volunteer. Click here.

Spring 2013

Healthcare in Manhattan

New this spring: If you have a bachelor’s degree in any field and are interested in healthcare systems, the new Executive Master of Science in Health Systems program in Manhattan might be right for you. The 12-month program, offered by the Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science, teaches skills for modeling, analyzing and/or designing healthcare delivery systems and processes. Details at binghamton.edu/ssie.

Save the date: Homecoming 2013

Homecoming 2013 will take place Friday through Sunday, Oct. 11–13, on the Binghamton University campus. Enjoy a wonderful fall weekend and a great opportunity to reconnect with friends and places that you hold close to your heart. All alumni and their families are welcome. Learn more and let us know you’re planning to be here at homecoming.binghamton.edu.

Fall 2012

Never stop learning

If you’d like to take a class or earn a degree, the University offers programs that happen in real time or on your time. The School of Management offers a Fast-Track Professional MBA program in Manhattan and Executive MBA programs in Manhattan and Binghamton. The Graduate School of Education offers a master’s program in New Orleans. See more professional development and online courses at binghamton.edu/alumni/services.

Which campus icon means the most to you?
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Which campus icon means the most to you?

When Edgar Levy ’85 asked, “If you had to choose one iconic feature on campus that has meaning to you as an alum, which one would it be?” alumni started posting and, many months later, they’re still comparing notes!

For some, the library tower was the iconic spot before the clock tower overtook it in 2000. For others, it was Lake Lieberman, the Pub and even the pathway through the woods to the East Gym.

Levy, an alumni board member, asked his question on the Binghamton University Alumni Association Professional Network group on LinkedIn, our official home for peer and alumni-to-student networking (and occasional reminiscing). Also on LinkedIn is the Binghamton University Alumni Association Job Forum, where you can post job openings and view jobs that have been added by alumni.

Start networking now at linkedIn.com.