A motivation for innovation

How does Binghamton stack up?

Obama's plan vs. Binghamton's reality



A motivation for innovation

Trading places

In flipped classes, the lecture is the homework



A motivation for innovation

Flipping isn't just for engineers

Anthropology finds time for hands-on work



A motivation for innovation

Mastering statistics

Self-paced option offers more time to learn



A motivation for innovation

Objects of interest

Art museum is lab for learning



A motivation for innovation

Art and academia merge

New uses for the museum



A motivation for innovation

MOOCs in our future?

Lack of interaction is a big concern



A motivation for innovation

She knows MOOCs

Alumna teaches one and takes one



A motivation for innovation

A motivation for innovation

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She knows MOOCs

Alumna teaches one and takes one

A motivation for innovation
PROVIDED
Lauren Colantonio '13 helps teach a MOOC, and she takes one, too.

Lauren Colantonio ’13 is getting a lesson in MOOCs not only as a student in one but as the lead teaching assistant in another.

She is working on a MOOC called Giving with Purpose, funded by the Learning by Giving Foundation. She became interested in the job because of her experience taking Associate Professor David Campbell’s Philanthropy and Civil Society course, which is also funded by the foundation.

One of the MOOC’s attractions, Colantonio says, is that students of all ages and from around the world can interact and discuss the material; her job is to make sure the 15 TAs can answer questions accurately and quickly.

Colantonio also is helping prepare for the final grant competition. That’s where 40 nonprofits make the final cut to vie for shares of $100,000 in grant money. “It’s rewarding that I have an integral role in orchestrating the success of the first-ever MOOC on philanthropy,” she says.

In her spare time, Colantonio is taking introduction to computer science on the MOOC site Udacity.com. “I majored in political science and Italian with a minor in French. Now I’m learning how to write Python programs. I love that I have the accessibility to a subject I thought I would never learn anything about.”