Stories sustain us

Irrepressible Alice

She plays the trumpet and lampoons the lesson



Stories sustain us

Alice Xue's comic

My Seventh Trumpet Lesson with Professor Benjamin Aldridge (panel 1)



Stories sustain us

Alice Xue's comic, continued

My Seventh Trumpet Lesson with Professor Benjamin Aldridge (panel 2)



Stories sustain us

Alice Xue's comic, continued

My Seventh Trumpet Lesson with Professor Benjamin Aldridge (panel 3)



Stories sustain us

Diva of drama

Writer bursts a few bubbles about soaps



Stories sustain us

Character study

You have a story to tell



Stories sustain us

How to tell your story

7 questions to help get you started



Stories sustain us

Stage fright takes the stage

Song puts alumnus in spotlight



Stories sustain us

Stories sustain us

Return to the first page of the Cover Story.



How to tell your story

7 questions to help get you started

Stories sustain us
Jonathan Cohen
Myra Sabir

Myra Sabir, assistant professor of human development, offers three warm-up exercises to get you thinking.

1. What “story-in-progress” did you enter at birth? What is your earliest understanding of each character and their roles? What was the location of the story?

2. Given your personality and the way you see things, how did you fit yourself into the story?

3. In what way are you now trying to make that story better?

Elizabeth Tucker, professor of English, literature and rhetoric, says there are easy ways to find and explore folklore in your life.

1. Your occupation. Do you work in a job that has its own jargon — words or syntax that outsiders wouldn’t understand? Do you and your co-workers tell (and retell) stories that entertain, instruct and even frighten each other?

2. What community or social groups do you belong to? What do you share with the other people in the group?

3. What family stories are repeated at reunions or holiday gatherings?

4. What food must be served at a family holiday meal, and why?