Graduate Course Offerings

The following is a sample of the graduate course offerings in mechanical engineering. See official course listings in the University Bulletin or register for classes through the the BU Brain.

ME 506, VEHICLE CONTROL AND SIMULATION

Concepts of modeling and simulation of vehicle dynamics are developed with particular emphasis on real-time simulation. The digital simulation of the continuous system is developed as a discrete dynamic system that may be filtered, tuned, stabilized, controlled, analyzed and synthesized. Also included are coordinate transformation techniques for multi-degree of freedom systems and numerical integration techniques in the context of real-time applications. Term project involves the simulation of the dynamics of a vehicle such as an aircraft or a land vehicle. Prerequisite: BS degree in engineering or physics or consent of instructor.
fall, odd-numbered years, 3 cr. Dynamics Systems and Acoustics AOC

ME 511, ELASTICITY

Topics covered include three-dimensional analysis and representation of stress and strain, development of governing equations of elastic media, applications of these equations to two- and three-dimensional problems. Prerequisite: mechanics of materials or consent of instructor. fall, 3 cr. Applied Mechanics AOC.

ME 514, PLASTICITY

Fundamentals of deformation and strength concepts of isotropic materials. Plastic stress-strain relations, criteria for yielding under multiaxial stress and properties of the yield surface under loading and unloading schemes. Hardness tests and forging problems. Elasto-plastic deformation of torsional and flexural members, hollow spheres and thick-walled tubes. Slip-line analysis for indentation problems, and limit analysis for frame structures and plates. Finite element theory with applications and practical programming experience in a convenient FEM code. Dynamic plasticity experimental methods are discussed. Prerequisites: ME 511 or consent of instructor. 3 cr. Applied Mechanics AOC.

ME 517, FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS I

An introductory course in the finite element (FE) method dealing with the fundamental principles. Problems solved in the areas of solid mechanics, structures, fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Use of standard FE software such as ANSYS. Prerequisite: mechanics of materials or consent of instructor. spring, 3 cr. Applied Mechanics AOC.

ME 518, ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS

"This course is a graduate level solid mechanics course focused on the mechanical behaviors of solids in the elastic as well as plastic range. Topics covered include the elasticity solutions in contact mechanics problems and thin plates, elastic and plastic behaviors of metallic solids under uniaxial and combined stresses, yielding and failure criteria, plastic constitutive relations for both perfectly plastic solids and work-hardening solids, elasto-plastic solutions of simple structures. This course is suitable for first/second year graduate students with sound math and mechanics backgrounds". spring, 3 cr. Applied Mechanics AOC.

ME 520/MSE 520, MECHANICS OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS

Course introduces the concept and advantage of composite materials to the graduate student and advanced senior students. It covers the nature of composites and mechanics of composites for analytical approaches to model the behavior of material. Prerequisite: ME 211, ME 562 or equivalent. 3 cr. Applied Mechanics AOC.

ME 521, DYNAMICS OF MEMS AND MICROSYSTEMS

Modeling and characterization of MEMS structures: static analysis, free undamped vibration, free damped vibration in coupled fields (structural, electrostatic, fluidic, thermoelastic); forced vibration, reduced-order modeling. Introduction to perturbation and nonlinear dynamics. Prerequisite: undergraduate course in vibrations. 3 cr. Dynamics Systems and Acoustics AOC

ME 522, ACOUSTICS

Propagation of sound. Acoustic wave motion. Reflection of sound waves from boundaries. Sound transmission through walls. Sound generation and radiation. Sound propagation in ducts. Acoustic transducers: loudspeakers and microphones. Auditory systems, bioacoustics. Prerequisite: graduate standing in engineering or physics. 3 cr. Dynamics Systems and Acoustics AOC

ME 523, ADVANCED DYNAMICS

Fundamentals of mechanics for students in engineering practice and students contemplating further in-depth study in mechanics. Topics included are: Mechanics of particle and systems of particles; D'Alembert's principle and Lagrange's equations; kinematics of rigid body motion; multi-reference frames; rigid body equations of motion — Euler equations; applications. Prerequisite: undergraduate course in dynamics. 3 cr. Dynamics Systems and Acoustics AOC

ME 524, ADVANCED MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS

Fundamentals of dynamics as applied to mechanically vibrating systems. Equations of motion for systems with multiple degrees of freedom are developed to determine natural modes of vibration of discrete systems. Approximate methods of solution, e.g., Rayleigh-Ritz, Galerkin's method, etc., are discussed. Vibration of continuous systems, e.g., free and forced vibration of strings, bars, beams and plates are considered. Numerical approaches, including the finite element method, are applied to continuous systems. Prerequisite: ME 421 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. 3 cr. Applied Mechanics and Dynamics Systems and Acoustics AOCs.

ME 527, MECHATRONICS

Review of classical mechanics and electromagnetics. Operation of electric motors. Mechanical response of piezoelastic materials. Review of classical control. Current research in sensors and actuators. Signal conditioning. Design of active and passive vibration damping systems. Applications. Prerequisite: graduate standing in electrical or mechanical engineering or physics, or consent of instructor. 3 cr. Dynamics Systems and Acoustics AOC. 

ME 530, MAN-MACHINE SYSTEMS

Presents a systems-engineering characterization of the human operator and his or her interaction with simple and complex machines, such as airplanes and ground vehicles. Topics include human perception, information measurement, manual control and mathematical modeling of the human operator. Modern control theory is employed to characterize the man-machine system. Prerequisite: BS in engineering or consent of instructor. fall, even-numbered years, 3 cr. Dynamics Systems and Acoustics AOC.

ME 532, PRINCIPLES OF BIOMECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Study of the basic mechanical and electrical properties of the human body, including the dynamics of the cardiovascular system, the dynamics of limbs in locomotion and other activities; measurement of physiological parameters. Anatomy and physiology of these biological systems. Design of prosthetic devices. Projects will be included which will stress the mathematical modeling and analysis of the dynamics of limbs and the cardiovascular system. Prerequisite: BS in engineering or physics. 3 cr. Applied Mechanics AOC.

ME 534, ANALYSIS AND CONTROL OF MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

Presents the fundamentals of control theory applied to mechanical and industrial engineering problems. Emphasizes the mathematical modeling and analysis of the dynamics of mechanical systems such as aircraft, large space structures, robots, etc. Assignments model these systems, analyze the dynamics and define the requirements for control of these devices. Concentration is on analysis as opposed to design. Digital simulations are a major tool for analysis, which employs both classical and stale space techniques. Prerequisite: BS in mechanical or industrial engineering or consent of instructor. spring, 4 cr. Dynamics Systems and Acoustics AOC.

ME 535, ANALYTICAL METHODS

A survey of important analytical and numerical methods for mathematical modeling of engineering and scientific problems. Topics include solution of partial differential equations, including methods for linear equations, eigen function expansions and separation of variables; review of multi-variable calculus, including vector analysis; and selected topics in linear algebra, integral transforms and numerical approximation techniques. The analysis methods are introduced in the context of typical engineering applications. Prerequisites: ordinary differential equations, ME 302. 3 cr.

ME 540, TRANSPORT PHENOMENA I

A foundation for transport analysis is developed in terms of the physical modes of heat and mass transfer and the formulation of math models. Theory of diffusion conduction, single-phase forced and natural convection, phase-change convection, modern applications including microscale processes are addressed. Prerequisite: BSME or equivalent or consent of instructor. Term varies. 3 credits. fall, Transport Phenomena AOC.

ME 541, COMPUTATIONAL FLUIDS AND HEAT TRANSFER

Fundamentals of computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer as they relate to incompressible flow, conduction and convection. The course involves both MATLAB implementations and the use of commercial software. Prerequisites: undergraduate heat transfer, fluid mechanics and differential equations, or consent of instructor. spring, 3 cr. Transport Phenomena AOC.

ME 550, INTRODUCTION TO FLUID DYNAMICS

A foundation for the analysis of inviscid and viscous incompressible flow is developed. Foundation topics include Eularian description, material derivative, relative motion (strain-rate tensor), vorticity, Newtonian fluid model. Equations of motion are formulated, leading to Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Potential flow solutions are discussed. Viscous flow is studied using Stokes, lubrication and boundary layer approximations. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. fall, 3 cr. Transport Phenomena AOC.

ME 552 TRANSPORT PHENOMENA II

Multiphase Flows and complex fluids are treated from a theoretical and physical perspective. Fundamental and applied research topics are covered, including volume-averaged governing equations, particle-fluid and particle-particle interactions, complex fluids and colloidal dispersions, dynamics of droplets and bubbles, interfacial conditions, stability, atomization and sprays, and experimental mthods. Prerequisites: ME 550/MSE560 (or equivalent) Term varies. 3 credits. Transport Phenomena AOC.

ME 554, VISCOUS FLOW

Various topics in viscous incompressible fluid flow. Navier-Stokes equations, boundary layers, vorticity, Stokes flow, lubrication approximation, Hele-Shaw flow, capillarity, thin films, interfacial stability. Prerequisites: undergraduate fluid mechanics, ME 535, or consent of instructor. spring, 3 cr. Transport Phenomena AOC.

ME 562/MSE 562, MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS

A study of the response of materials to applied stresses, especially stress-induced failures. Relationship between structure and properties, with emphasis on microstructural changes and failure. Macroscopic and microscopic concepts of fracture mechanics, fatigue, creep and their interactions. Emphasis on design applications and failure analysis. Prerequisites: undergraduate courses in mechanics of materials and materials science, or consent of instructor. 3 cr. Applied Mechanics AOC.

ME 563, POLYMER MATERIALS ENGINEERING

Course is designed to introduce students to the manufacture, processing and applications of polymer materials. Emphasis on relationship between structure of polymer molecules and properties of those polymeric materials. The control of structure in the manufacture and processing of polymers. Factors to be considered in application and in the analysis of failures. Both thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers will be examined. Prerequisite: undergraduate course in materials engineering. 3 cr.

ME 567, PHYSICAL FORCES AT MICRO- AND NANOSCALES

Scaling of physical phenomena at microscale or nanoscale geometries. Electromagnetic forces, fluid mechanics, solid mechanics, optics, thermal transport, capillary forces, van der Waals forces, sensors, MEMS, microfluidics, microactuators. Case studies of micro- and nanodevices to illustrate scaling of physical forces at extremely small scales. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. 3 cr.

ME 570, INTRODUCTION TO NANOTECHNOLOGY

Basic concepts in nanoscience and nanotechnology will be introduced. The course will cover nanostructured materials and devices, nanofabrication techniques, nanoscale materials and devices characterization, applications of nanotechnology in electronics and biomedical applications. Term varies. 3 credits 3 cr. Applied Mechanics AOC.

ME 573/MSE 573, NANOTECHNOLOGY IN SMALL SCALE SYSTEMS

A survey of the basic concepts and typical examples of nanotechnology in small scale systems, those include electronic and optical devices, sensors, micro/nanoelectromechanical systems, materials systems for nanomedicine, etc. 3 cr.

ME 580A, STRUCTURAL FATIGUE ANALYSIS

This course would cover the following topics: Introduction to Fatigue design methods, Fatigue tests Stress-life approach (S-N), Cyclic deformation (strain-life approach) , Applications of Linear elastic fracture mechanics to fatigue crack growth, Residual Stresses and their effects on Fatigue resistance, Fatigue from variable amplitude loading, Environmental affects, Fatigue under Multi-axial stresses, Statistical aspects of Fatigue.  3 cr. 

ME 580C, NANOMATERIALS

This course will examine intermolecular forces in nanomaterials with emphasis on van der Waal's-dispersion forces and repulsive steric forces.The implications of these forces for surface-surface, particle-surface and particle-particle interaction, wetting and self-assembly/organization will be treated. The course is intended to provide students with a basic understanding of dispersions of functional materials (solution-processed nanomaterials), from their synthesis to their deposition to form mesoscale structures. 3cr.

ME 581, COMPUTER-AIDED ENGINEERING

Fundamentals of computer graphics, interactive graphics, introduction to CAD, modeling, analysis and optimization. Introduction of finite element method and use of standard packages for design problems. Dynamic simulation. Prerequisites: ME 274 and ME 211. Cannot be taken in addition to ME 381 or equivalent. fall, 3 cr. Applied Mechanics AOC.

ME 582, ADVANCED COMPUTER-AIDED ENGINEERING

Parametric design will be stressed. GD&T, integration of CAD with FEA and CAM. Theory and principles of CAD modeling and configuration management. Projects and laboratory assignments will include solid modeling, structural and thermal finite element analysis, optimization, and manufacturing file output (CAM). Weekly laboratory. Final project will be a team, concurrent, distributed design project. Prerequisites: ME 381 or ME 581 or equivalent. spring, 3 cr. Applied Mechanics AOC.

ME 583C, INTRODUCTION TO SOFT MATTER

An introduction to basic concepts, interactions, structures, and properties of soft materials. Topics include polymers, liquid crystals, colloids, surfactants and lipids, polymeric nanocomposites, and biomatierals.

ME 610, FRACTURE MECHANICS

Course introduces a new concept of the failure of materials and structures. Increasing usage of high strength materials drive the failure mechanism more toward fracture dominant failure over the yielding dominant failure. Linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and its applications will be covered. Elastic-Plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) briefly introduced. Prerequisite: ME 511 or equivalent. 3 cr. Applied Mechanics AOC.

ME 618, FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS II

Second-level course in the understanding of finite element method. Covers variational formulations, non-linear static and dynamic analysis, transient problems and other specialized features of applying the finite element method to solve engineering problems. The FE code ANSYS and/or CAEDS is used to solve the projects assigned in the course. Prerequisite: ME 517 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Applied Mechanics AOC.

ME 622, ADVANCED ACOUSTICS

Physics of sound propagation. Acoustics wave motion. Reflection of sound waves from boundaries. Sound transmission through walls. Sound generation and radiation from vibrating structures. Sound propagation in ducts. Coupled acoustical systems: interaction of sound with structures. Scattering of sound. Acoustics of small-scale systems; viscous effects. Prerequisite: graduate standing in engineering or physics. 3 cr. Dynamics Systems and Acoustics AOC.

ME 627, RANDOM VIBRATIONS

Methods for analyzing the response of vibrating systems with random inputs. Correlation and spectral methods for discrete and continuous vibrating structures. Analysis of non-linear systems using equivalent linearization, Gaussian closure and the Fokker-Plank equation. Applications include flow-induced vibrations, response of distributed systems to spatially random fields, reliability analysis and high-cycle fatigue life predictions. Prerequisites: graduate course in mechanical vibration and a course in ordinary differential equations, or consent of instructor. 3 cr. Dynamics Systems and Acoustics AOC.

ME 629, NONLINEAR SYSTEMS DYNAMICS

Introduction and examples of non-linear systems from various branches of science and engineering. Non-linear second-order systems, phase-plane analysis. Stability of linear and non-linear systems; Liapunov's criteria, Popov's frequency method, limit cycles. Approximate techniques: perturbation and averaging methods. Computational methods in non-linear analysis. Prerequisite: ME 524 or equivalent. 3 cr. Dynamics Systems and Acoustics AOC.

ME 635, ANALYTICAL METHODS II

Generalized functions, complex variable methods, integral equations, functional analysis. Prerequisite: ME 535. 3 cr.

MSE 560, THERMODYNAMICS OF MATERIALS

Examines basic thermodynamic principles including energy, entropy and free energy, and describes the concepts of equilibrium states, phases and phase transformations. The thermodynamic treatment of ideal, regular and real solutions is reviewed. Other topics include the application of phase diagrams, the thermodynamic description of interfaces and the statistical interpretation of thermodynamics on the atomistic level. 3 credits. Materials and Energy AOC.

MSE 562, MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS

A study of the response of materials to applied stresses, especially stress-induced failures. Relationship between structure and properties, with emphasis on microstructural changes and failure. Macroscopic and microscopic concepts of fracture mechanics, fatigue, creep and their interactions. Emphasis on design applications and failure analysis. Prerequisites: undergraduate courses in mechanics of materials and materials science, or consent of instructor. Materials AOC.

MSE 565, CRYSTALLOGRAPHY AND DIFFRACTION

Fundamentals of bonding in solids; basic crystallography of materials; point groups and space groups; tensor properties of crystals; symmetry and physical properties; atomic packing and structures; glassy state; polycrystalline aggregates; grain boundaries and interfaces; textures; multiphase materials; reciprocal space and its application to structure analysis; basic diffraction theory and diffraction methods; crystal structure determination by powder and single crystal techniques. Prerequisites: undergraduate course in introductory materials science or consent of instructor. Materials AOC.

MSE 566, REACTIVITY OF MATERIALS

Understanding the synthesis and reactivity of solids, phase and defect equilibria. Use of phase diagrams. Overview of atomistic mechanisms and mathematics of diffusion, phase transformations and microstructural evolution. Consideration of surfaces and interfaces, including adsorption and wetting behavior. Materials AOC.

MSE 569, SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND MICROANALYSIS

Parametric design will be stressed. GD and T, integration of CAD with FEA and CAM. Theory and principles of CAD modeling and configuration management. Projects and laboratory assignments will include solid modeling, structural and thermal finite element analysis, optimization, and manufacturing file output (CAM). Weekly laboratory. Final project will be a team, concurrent, distributed design project. Prerequisites: ME 381 or ME 581 or equivalent. Term varies. 3 credits. Materials AOC.

MSE 570, TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Transmis'n Electron Microscopy Basic functions of the various components of a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) instrument; the physics and theory of electron scattering and electron diffraction; the physics of the interactions between fast electrons and the specimen; TEM imaging and contrast mechanism; high resolution TEM; the analytical techniques of energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS); operational modes and various types of TEM techniques to probe the structure, composition and chemistry of materials. Prerequisite: graduate status, senior standing or consent of instructor. 3 credits. Materials AOC.

Last Updated: 12/4/14