ALICE G. FRIEDMAN

Associate Professor of Psychology

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Internship: West Virginia University Medical Center, Morgantown 
Post-doctoral fellowship: NIMH Postdoctoral Fellowship in Pediatric Psychology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center 
Area: Clinical Psychology 
E-mail: afriedm@binghamton.edu
Phone: 607-777-4570 
Office: Science IV, Room 210

Professional Activities:

Director, Louis Marx, Jr. Center for Children and Families, Binghamton University

Research Description:

My research focus on two separate areas: psychological adjustment in young children and behavioral medicine/pediatric psychology. In the first area, I examine fears, anxiety and coping in healthy children and those faced with challenges associated with medical illness. Much of this research is conducted under the auspices of the Louis Marx, Jr. Center for Children and Families. The Center, which has benefited from funding from the venture capitalist Louis Marx Jr. and his related businesses and associates, supports a range of projects conducted by Alice Friedman and her graduate students in schools, hospitals and the community. The research is geared towards enhancing health and development of children. Current projects include evaluating the efficacy of behavioral strategies for increasing health related behaviors in young children, examining the impact of specialty camps on children with medical illness and their families and exploring the relationships among affect/emotionality and academic achievement/coping with challenges. The second focal area is behavioral medicine/pediatric psychology. This area focuses on the interface between the psychological adjustment and physical health. We are currently working on a large multi-year study, funded by the Arthritis Foundation, designed to promote exercise and positive health related habits in older individuals with arthritis. This study is being conducted in collaboration with a local hospital.

The lab has a behavioral focus and is best suited to students who already view themselves as behavioral and have some background in behavioral theory. Students are major contributors to research, empirical and chapter writing and they help with grant preparation. The overall approach to training is that of junior colleague so students have considerable responsibility for helping to run the lab. The lab is suited best to students who are committed to future careers involving research and who also are committed to improving the well-being of children and families.

Selected Publications:

Friedman, A. G., Goldberg, J.& Okifuji, A. (1998). Behavior theory in behavioral medicine. (Pp246-268). In G. Eifert and Plaud (Eds). Bringing Behavior Theory into Behavioral Therapy. New York: Allyn & Bacon.

Friedman, A.G., Marx, S., & Dahlquist, L.A. (1998). Childhood Cancer. In T.H. Ollendick and Hersen (Eds). Handbook of Child Psychopathology. (Pp. 435-461) New York: Plenum press.

Coleman, C., Friedman, A, and Burright, R.G. (1998). Effects of daily stress and health related behaviors on adolescent Cholesterol levels. Adolescence, 33, 447-460.

D'Amico, P., & Friedman, A.G. (1996). Involvement of parents as behavior change agents in the reduction of children's fears. Innovations in Clinical Practice: A source book. Sarasota, Fl: Professional Resource Inc.

Blau, C.M., & Friedman, A.G. (1996). Empathic responding in children with a chronic illness. Children's Health Care, 25(1), 53-69.

 

 

Last Updated: 6/27/14