Roommates, Suitemates & Apartmentmates

Sharing day-to-day laughter, sorrow, anger and joy with another person and getting to know that person may be one of the most memorable college experiences. Living with another person provides great potential for personal growth. However, it can be challenging, and it requires your roommate(s), suitemates and you to live cooperatively in an area perhaps smaller than your room at home. Suggesting the need for compromise, sensitivity and self-appraisal that often arises, one student wrote:

Five friends gather around guitar hero in a residence hall room

Living in close quarters with others can sometimes be a challenging and revealing experience. One is exposed not only to new personalities, attitudes and lifestyles, but also to a host of unfamiliar frustrations. Ironically, we often overlook our own bad habits, which can be equally as agitating in the eyes of our roommate(s) or suitemates. Sometimes it is necessary to live with others before you can know yourself.

Roommates are assigned randomly unless students mutually request to live with each other; in that case, we will attempt to meet this request. Students who request to live with each other will not be assigned to University housing until the Housing Preference Forms, indicating the mutual requests of all students, are received in the Residential Life Office. Meeting such requests may result in our inability to meet requests for a specific college/community or residence hall/house. Your housing requests or preferences are not honored if the request conflicts with the mission of the University and our affirmative action guidelines. Most assignments of roommates work out remarkably well, often developing into lasting friendships. During the summer you will receive the name and address of your roommate(s) so you can get in touch with each other before you come to campus.

All Binghamton University residential facilities are smoke free. Smoking is not permitted in apartments, bedrooms, hallways/corridors, lounges, washrooms, lobbies, laundry rooms, study rooms, stairwells, service rooms, offices, etc. This is not only reflective of our interest in student health, but is also consistent with changes in NYS regulations as well.

For those students who wish to live in an atmosphere free of smoke, alcohol or other substances, Chemical-free Housing is offered on specific floors in Dickinson, Hinman, Newing, CIW, and Mountainview.

The University's mission of educating students extends beyond the classroom; college is also an opportunity for social learning. The halls and houses, with the diverse outlooks and lifestyles of their residents, encourage this informal, but nonetheless important, aspect of learning. You are in an excellent position to learn from one another in the residential areas, because of the different backgrounds and expectations of the students assigned to the area. Social interaction can help you discover more about yourself than a lifetime in the classrooms.

But, as in the classroom, learning can sometimes be difficult. Just as teachers and teaching assistants offer guidance in course work, so too do the residence hall staff in living situations. Resident assistants (RAs) are peers who offer their understanding and aid in coping with various concerns. They serve as peer counselors and advisers, chosen for their ability to empathize, sympathize, organize and answer questions. The resident directors (RDs) are professional staff members who oversee the entire hall, and can provide further support and counseling. If you have questions about housing policy or student services or just need help in solving a problem, don't hesitate to speak to the resident assistant of your floor, the resident director of your hall, or the assistant director of your residential college or community.

The purpose of all of these resource people is to make University housing more than buildings filled with people. The intent is to make your stay a rewarding time of personal and community growth.

Apartmentmates

Apartment mates are assigned randomly.

Students assigned to Hillside Community who request to live with each other will not be assigned to University housing until the Housing Preference Forms indicating the mutual request of both students are received in the Residential Life Office. Meeting such requests may result in our inability to meet requests for a specific house.

Housing requests or preferences are not honored if the request conflicts with the mission of the University and our affirmative action guidelines.

All Binghamton University residential facilities are smoke free. Smoking is not permitted in apartments, bedrooms, hallways/corridors, lounges, washrooms, lobbies, laundry rooms, study rooms, stairwells, service rooms, offices, etc. This change is not only reflective of our interest in student health, but is also consistent with changes in NYS regulations as well.

Last Updated: 7/18/14