SPRING 2017
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
FRENCH  |  ITALIAN  |  SPANISH

Spring 2017 Course Descriptions
FRENCH/ITALIAN/SPANISH
           

FREN 111 -01   Elementary French I                                                        Swoffer-Penna

                  -02                                                                                                   Ayan

                  -03                                                                                                   Gerlach

First part of communication-based foundation course.  Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. PREREQUISITE: NO PREVIOUS TRAINING IN FRENCH OR MAXIMUM ONE YEAR IN HIGH SCHOOL. NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS OR THOSE WITH PRIOR KNOWLEDGE OF THE LANGUAGE. Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html.  Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience

FREN 115 -01      Elementary French II                                                      Johnson

                -02                                                                                                      Swoffer-Penna

                -03                                                                                                      Johnson          

Second part of communication-based foundation course.  Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. Students with credit for FREN 115 or equivalent may not take this course. PREREQUISITE: FRENCH 111 OR MAXIMUM TWO YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL FRENCH. NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS OR THOSE WITH PRIOR KNOWLEDGE OF THE LANGUAGE.  Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html  Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience

FREN 211 -01   French III                                                                                  Johnson

                  -02                                                                                                   Clarke 

First part of communication-based intermediate-level French. Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. PREREQUISITE: FREN 115 OR MAXIMUM THREE YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL FRENCH. NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS. Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html.  Students may be removed from this course if theyexceed the appropriate level of experience.

FREN 212 -01                                                                                                  Cope
For students brought up with some French. Some basic competence with oral French is assumed, but no specific level of proficiency is required. Teaches basic French grammar, syntax, reading and writing while focusing on students’ connection to one another and to the wider Francophone world.

FREN 215 -01       French IV                                                                               Clarke

Second part of communication-based intermediate-level French.  Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. PREREQUISITE: FREN 211 OR MORE THAN THREE YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL FRENCH. NOT FOR HERITAGE/NATIVE FRENCH SPEAKERS. Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html.  Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

FREN 241                                                                                                           Bosworth
Discussions of French culture and civilization, short literary works, and visual materials, with reinforcement of selected grammatical structures.   Class work is intended to improve skills in speaking, reading and writing French. PREREQUISITE: FREN 215 OR MAXIMUM OF FIVE YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL FRENCH.

 

FREN 341 Advanced Conversation                                                                     Patterson
High-level spoken French for a wide range of creative, practical, professional and academic contexts. Assignments will include watching and discussing films, news broadcasts and other media, leading debates on social issues, and group video projects as well as some short written assignments, grammar and vocabulary review, and quizzes.  PREREQUISITE: French 215 or equivalent; 241 strongly recommended, or instructor permission.

FREN 380A/ling 380D French phonetics and pronunciation                          Bosworth
This course offers a systematic and concrete study of the French sound system and prosody. It aims at developing correct articulation of French sounds in isolation and correct pronunciation at the level of the syllable, word, phrase, and sentence in connected speech, including development of native-like intonation. Common learner difficulties will be addressed through comparative analysis of relevant features of French and English phonetics. Upon completion of this course, you will demonstrate significant improvement of your mastery of French pronunciation and will acquire the knowledge and the tools to continue to improve independently. Class sessions will consist of interactive discussion and review of theoretical content, pronunciation practice, and analytical exercises. Classes are conducted in French at the appropriate level of complexity for the students. A significant amount of independent pronunciation practice outside class is expected. Pre-requisite: FREN241 OR 251.

FREN 381B        Confronting the Other                                                  Polachek
What do  French  literary, visual, and other cultural productions tell us about the formation of our identity and sense of self?  How do encounters with other  societies, other social classes, and  other  values force us to confront our  preconceptions of others as well as of ourselves ? As we examine works from the 18th century to   the 21st century, we will see how these themes reflect historical moments, as well as serve as springboards for re-evaluation for future generations.     Providing an overview of French works  from the 18th century to the present ,  the course will include an introduction to major genres (novels, graphic novels, poetry, plays) by  authors that   include Marivaux, Diderot,Baudelaire, Duras, Sartre, and  Beckett . Related films by important French filmmakers will also be included.   An important gateway course for higher level courses. This course counts  as a 300-level literature course for  the French major (both tracks) as well as for the minor.  Format: Lecture/discussion, oral presentations, small group discussions, two papers, two exams.Class conducted in French. Students from other disciplines welcome, and may do their  written work in English if their department/program allows.  Prerequisites:  At least one 300-level French course. Freshman: AP score of 5 or IB 5 or above or permission of instructor.  

FREN 481J /581J/MDVL 481D/grad    Censorship, Controversy and Debate                             Patterson
What made medieval literature “good” in its time, and what made it scandalous? By what aesthetic and moral criteria did medieval audiences evaluate texts and performances, and how did they react to provocative material? This course explores medieval and early Renaissance texts that generated controversy, resistance and debate. We will read primary texts as well as responses from readers, fellow authors, and church and university authorities. We will look at how practices such as selective translation and rewriting as a form of critique contribute to the dynamic literary traditions of this period. Finally, we will consider how fictional representations of reading, writing and debate reflect upon the social function of literature.  Class will be conducted in English, with readings available in French and in English. Students seeking credit in French will complete most readings and written assignments in French and must have taken at least two 300-level courses in French or obtain instructor permission. No language prerequisite for MDVL students, who may complete assignments in English.

FREN 481K/ 581K/afst 480F     “Haiti’s New Narratives”                                                                Cope
Course description (long): In the wake of the world’s well meaning but ruinously misguided humanitarian response to the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, it had become clear that widespread and deeply held notions of Haitian exceptionalism continued to plague Haiti’s relationship with the rest of the world. As a result, many Haitian and Dyasporaauthors and scholars called for “new narratives for Haiti” that inspire neither admiration nor pity, but real empathy with Haitians among their transnational readership. In this course, following a brief historical and artistic contextualization of the literature, learners will read and analyze a cross-section of post-earthquake writing. Then, learners will evaluate the effectiveness of that writing in inspiring genuine empathy (as opposed to sympathy) with Haitians. This will include careful attention to how authors use the elements of literature to evoke empathy and an interrogation of the reader’s role in that process. Learners will further contextualize the target corpus by exploring basic elements of Haitian culture and daily life, especially with regard to Haitian relationship(s) to community. Finally, learners will contemplate the broader implications of Haiti’s “new narratives” both for Haiti and for the world.  Class conducted entirely in French. Two 300-level FREN courses (including one 300-level FREN literature course) OR instructor permission required.

Course description (short):  Following a brief historical and artistic contextualization of the literature, learners will read and analyze a cross-section of post-earthquake Haitian writing. This course will include a study of how authors use the elements of literature to evoke empathy and an interrogation of the reader’s role in that process. Class conducted entirely in French. Two 300-level FREN courses (including one 300-level FREN literature course) OR instructor permission required

ITAL 111 -01/02 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I                                                         Cook, M

                   -03                                                                                                             Lee

 First part of communication-based foundation course.  Reading, writing, listening comprehension and

speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. PREREQUISITE: NO PREVIOUS TRAINING IN ITALIAN OR MAXIMUM ONE YEAR IN HIGH SCHOOL. NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS OR THOSE WITH PRIOR KNOWLEDGE OF THE LANGUAGE. Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.htmlStudents may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

 

ITAL 115 -01-02 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN II                                                            Lee
                -03                                                                                                                Samiani
                 -04                                                                                                               Cook

Second part of communication-based foundation course.  Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. Students with credit for ITAL 115 or equivalent may not take this course.  PREREQUISITE: ITALIAN 111 OR MAXIMUM TWO YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL ITALIAN. NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS OR THOSE WITH PRIOR KNOWLEDGE OF THE LANGUAGE.  Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html . Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

 

ITAL 211 -01/02 INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I                                                                       Moroni

  First part of communication-based intermediate-level Italian. Reading, writing, listening  comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. PREREQUISITE: ITAL 115 OR MAXIMUM THREE YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL ITALIAN. NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS. Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html.  Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.


ITAL 215 -01 INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II                                                               Samiani
Second part of communication-based intermediate-level Italian. Reading, writing, listening  comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out.  PREREQUISITE: ITAL 211, OR  MORE THAN THREE  YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL ITALIAN.  NOT FOR HERITAGE/NATIVE ITALIAN SPEAKERS. Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found athttp://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html.  Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

ITAL 251                                                                                                                      Samiani
This is an intermediate-level course that focuses on the development of spoken and written language skills through examining Italian culture and literature. We will learn about the regions and traditions of some famous Italian writers. As we study literary texts, film, and various other media, we will be able to better understand Italy as it is today. Conducted in Italian. FORMAT: Grade based on regular attendance, participation, quizzes, tests and assignments. PREREQUISITE: ITAL 215 or equivalent.


ITAL 380A Italian through Film                                                                                      Hennessey      
This course examines Italian grammar, vocabulary, and composition through the study of film. Students will review topics taught in 200-level courses, then move to structures that develop increased fluency in speaking, listening, and writing. This includes work on gestures, sayings, and expressions. Designed for individuals interested in improving their language skills through visual media, classes are organized around individual films that are viewed weekly. Comedies, dramas, action and historical films from the 20th and 21st centuries introduce themes such as family, immigration, terrorism, and love that serve as a basis for enhancing language skills.   Pre-requisite: Italian 215  

 

ITAL 481O/581L  Eternal City: Culture & Literature of Rome                               Moroni
Rome was the capital of an empire for hundreds of years. To the observer, the city presents itself as a written page in 3D, whose writing has been cleaned up, but never completely erased, then it has been written again and again in the various visual, material, and architectural styles of subsequent ages. The city of Rome has always had a privileged relationship with western history. It was built layer upon layer, through the centuries, from the times of the Empire to the age of fascism. In recent decades Pier Paolo Pasolini's and Federico Fellini's movies have captured on film many changes that took place in Rome. Through an interdisciplinary approach, this course deals with Rome from antiquity to the present from different perspectives: history, art, urban space, literature, film, and music. This course is taught in Italian.

 

ITAL 481P/581F   ITALIAN-AMERICAN  NEW YORK  IN FILM  AND SOCIETY      Hennessey           
This course explores Italian-American New York in cinema, television, and documentary. Films and television productions will be contextualized through readings in Italian-American culture, history, and literature. The bulk of the course focuses on Italian Americana in and around New York City, with films like Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather trilogy, Martin Scorsese’s Raging Bull, Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing, and television shows set in New Jersey: The Sopranos, Jersey Shore, and Boardwalk Empire. Visual and literary texts delineate a timeline that begins with the mass arrivals of Italian immigrants at Ellis Island in the 19th and early 20th centuries, through Prohibition and the postwar period, and ending in the present day. This background will be the basis for a discussion of how Italian-American New York is contoured through cinematic and televisual imagery; first fictional, then in the final part of the class, documentary. Through representations of Italian Americans in New York State and City, we will examine notions of race, national and regional identity, as well as Italian crime, corruption, and creativity. Students will conclude the course by writing or recording an oral history of the Italian-American experience in the New York area, past or present. Taught in English, with some assignments in Italian for students taking the course toward an Italian major or minor.


SPAN 111 -01 ELEMENTARY SPANISH I                                                               Samiani
                 02/03                                                                                                            Totolis
                  04                                                                                                                Hamdan
First part of communication-based foundation course.  Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. PREREQUISITE: NO PREVIOUS TRAINING IN SPANISH OR MAXIMUM ONE YEAR IN HIGH SCHOOL. NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS OR THOSE WITH PRIOR KNOWLEDGE OF THE LANGUAGE.  Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html .Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

SPAN 115 -01   ELEMENTARY SPANISH II                                                                        Iekel
                  -02/03/04                                                                                                    Hamdan                                               
Second part of communication-based foundation course.  Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. Students with credit for SPAN 115 or equivalent may not take this course. PREREQUISITE: SPANISH 111 OR MAXIMUM TWO YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL SPANISH. NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS OR THOSE WITH PRIOR KNOWLEDGE OF THE LANGUAGE.  Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html . Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

 

SPAN 175                                                                                                                             COOK, S
This course will enable students in the medical fields to communicate with the increasing Spanish-speaking population. The course has a Spanish grammar component, an introduction to cultural awareness in health care and basic vocabulary needed for communication pertinent to medical issues, such as general expressions used to gather basic information from a patient, parts of the body and description of symptoms.   THIS COURSE IS OPEN TO DECKER SCHOOL OF NURSING STUDENTS ONLY.  Permission of Instructor may be granted to students in related fields if seats become available during the add/drop period.

SPAN 211-01/02   INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I                                                                 Alonso                                                                   -03/04                                                                                                                      Kapral
                 -05                                                                                                                           Bedrin
                 -06                                                                                                                           Hassell
                 -07                                                                                                                           Bohinski
                 -08                                                                                                                           Bedrin                                                 
First part of communication-based intermediate-level Spanish. Reading, writing, listening  comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. PREREQUISITE: SPAN 115 OR MAXIMUM THREE YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL SPANISH.  NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS. Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.htmlStudents may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

 

SPAN 212 SPANISH GRAMMAR FOR BILINGUALS                                                        Castaneda
For students raised in a bilingual environment; although some competence with spoken Spanish is presumed, no specific degree of proficiency is required. Concentrates on basic grammar, syntax, reading and writing. FORMAT: Grade based on quizzes and examinations, homework, written assignments and class participation.

 

SPAN 215 -01/02 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II                                                                  Alonso

                  -03//04                                                                                                                    Bedrin           
Second part of communication-based intermediate-level Spanish. Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. PREREQUISITE: SPAN 211, OR MORE THAN THREE YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL SPANISH. NOT FOR HERITAGE/NATIVE SPANISH SPEAKERS.                  Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at

http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html .  Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

SPAN  250  - 01/02                                                                                                                     Cook
                    -03                                                                                                                         Castaneda

Culture-based Spanish course. Ability to understand and to participate in a casual conversation on current events, accompanied by practice in paraphrasing, as needed, to understand certain sophisticated or technical topics. Accuracy of expression through emphasis on correct grammatical expression and proficiency in the use of subject-verb and noun-adjective agreement and beginning ability to accurately use the subjunctive mood and appropriate choice of Spanish prepositions. Emphasizes current events in the news as well as other topics of cultural, historical, political, economic and educational interest. Broadens students' active vocabulary and knowledge in the areas. Not for native Spanish speakers. Required for the major for non-native speakers of Spanish. FORMAT: In addition to all-class discussions, students practice in small groups during each class. Compose six 1.5-to-two page essays during the semester. PREREQUISITE: SPAN 215 or equivalent. NOT FOR HERITAGE/NATIVE SPANISH SPEAKERS.

 

SPAN 251 -01                                                                                                                             Cstaneda
                  -02/03                                                                                                                       Pignatiello

Continuation of SPAN 250. Formerly called Spanish Syntax. Concentrates on grammatical structures and accuracy in writing. Required for the major. Class and small-group discussion of topics selected for compositions that require a moderately sophisticated use of vocabulary and syntactical and grammatical structures. Introduction to more difficult conversational topics that require more precise or technical vocabulary. Students become able to narrate events in the present, past and future with minimal errors in basic areas covered in SPAN 250, but with occasional difficulty in more complex structures, such as the use of the subjunctive mood, and gain ability to converse on all topics covered in class. Consolidation of language skills to prepare students for more advanced work. Open to all students. FORMAT: All work is in Spanish. Students compose six 2-to-3 page essays. PREREQUISITE: SPAN 250 or 212 or equivalent; sequential after SPAN 250.

 

SPAN 344  -01/lacs 344                                                                                                       Sobejano   
                   -02/lacs 344                                                                                                      Fajardo
                    -03/lcas 344                                                                                                                 Casanova
Introductory course in Spanish literature. Required for the major. Students participate in and contribute to sophisticated classroom discussions of the readings and prepare and present oral reports. Gain ability to recognize and explain the whole range of grammatical usage as well as ability to recognize basic rhetorical figures and tropes such as oxymoron, paradox, hyperbaton, etc. Expansion of basic vocabulary across the historical spectrum of national literatures. Read and understand works of literature -- poetry, prose, drama, essay -- with a minimum of lexical, cultural and historical aids necessary for understanding. FORMAT: Students write four 2-to-3 page essays. Specific application of general writing skills to literary genres and topics, with emphasis on clarity of thinking as the means leading to accuracy of expression. Conducted entirely in Spanish. PREREQUISITE: SPAN 212, 250, 251 or equivalent

 

SPAN 350 -01 ADVANCED SPANISH CONVERSATION   TR 10:05-11:30                                      SOBEJANO

This course will focus on controversial topics and universal themes that engage students in exciting and dynamic conversations and discussions.  To facilitate this discussion, we will introduce some literary texts –poems and short stories- that deal with the same topics of discussion and themes.  This class is intended for non-native speakers only.

PREREQUISITES:  SPAN 250 and 251 or equivalent or permission of instructor

 

 

SPAN 351/ling 380K   INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS                                                                     Kirschen
This course serves as an introduction to the field of Spanish Linguistics. We begin by discussing fundamental theories related to how one acquires a language. Taking Spanish as the primary language of exploration, we review various linguistic fields throughout the semester, including phonetics (the sounds of a language), phonology (the interaction and organization of sounds), morphology (the structure of words), and syntax (the structure of sentences). Our course will also provide an overview of the historical development of the Spanish language, including regional variation today. This course will be taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 251 or permission from professor.

 

SPAN 360     Hispanic Culture                                                                                              Casanova

Hispanic literature from the Middle Ages to the 17th century, plus colonial Latin American literature to the 18th century. Required for the major. Ability to participate in and to contribute actively and comfortably to classroom, as well as small-group, discussions of sophisticated topics with minimal loss of communication due to inadequate control of grammatical structures. Building on the skills and knowledge developed in the study of literary themes and topics in SPAN 344, this course will emphasize the interrelationship of analytical skills and clarity of thinking as the means of developing a personal style of expression. FORMAT: Students will write a paper and give an oral presentation. Conducted in Spanish. PREREQUISITE: SPAN 344 or equivalent.

SPAN 370/ lacs 370 -01    Hispanic Literature                                                                      Cook, S
Formerly called Survey of Latin American Literature. Selected readings reflecting historical developments in peninsular and Latin American literature from the 18th century to the contemporary period.  Builds on the skills and knowledge developed in SPAN 344; analytical skills and clarity of thinking as a means of developing expression in the language. Taught in Spanish. PREREQUISITE: SPAN 344 or equivalent.

 

SPAN 380C The Border & The Chican@Experience                                                                 Castaneda

 

SPAN 480B/581L Academic Writing through Hispanic American Film                            Pignatiello                  
This course has two goals. The first one is to introduce students to the history of film from Latin America and Spain. The second one is to develop key aspects of academic writing in Spanish using film as a primary subject. We will critically analyze Hispanic American films, and we will work on developing writing skills. The main objective of this course will be completing a final essay that will follow the main characteristics of most academic journals (citation, bibliography, theory, analysis, close reading, etc.).

 

SPAN 481N/581J   Cervantes's Short Fiction: Exemplary Novels   FAJARDO
Course taught in English. We shall read Cervantes’s Exemplary novels in in their ideological, cultural, and literary context, with some emphasis on form. The novels will be initially presented by the students. The presentation will be the basis for class discussion.

SPAN 485D/581K SOCIAL CONFLICT THROUGH CHILDREN’S  EYES:  LATIN AMERICAN  (CINEMA AND  LITERATURE)                                                                      ROS                              In this course, we will reflect on childhood through different forms of contemporary cultural production in Latin America. By focusing on a family or small community, the fictions to be discussed open a window into some crucial sociopolitical conflicts from the 1940s to the present. Children, the protagonists, experience these conflicts from an ambiguous insider-outsider position: on the one hand, they are dependent on their parents’ circumstances (revolutionary activism, death and loss, exile, migration, poverty, etc.) and, on the other hand, they question the meaning of those circumstances, challenging the tendency to present them as unquestionable or unchangeable.  Childhood, then, appears as a unique moment of creativity in which it is possible to rethink legacies of polarizing political ideologies and traditional social values although in a complex and often hostile social landscape. The discussion will be held in Spanish.  PREREQUISITE: SPAN 360 or 370.

 

Span ug/g/TRIP  Contact Llinguistics                                                                                                    Kirschen

 

 

 

FALL  2016
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
FRENCH  |  ITALIAN  |  SPANISH

 

FREN 111 -01  ELEMENTARY FRENCH I   MW 8:30-9:30;TR 8:30-9:55    SWOFFER-PENNA                    02                                                   MW 9:40-10:40;TR 10:05-11:30       MAUDUY                        03                                                   MW 10:50-11:50;TR 11:40-1:05        AYAN                           04                                                   MW 3:30-4:30;TR 4:25-5:50              GERLACH                             

First part of communication-based foundation course.  Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. PREREQUISITE: NO PREVIOUS TRAINING IN FRENCH OR MAXIMUM ONE YEAR IN HIGH SCHOOL. NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS OR THOSE WITH PRIOR KNOWLEDGE OF THE LANGUAGE. Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html.  Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

 

FREN 115 -01  ELEMENTARY FRENCH ll  MW 8:30-9:30;TR 8:30-9:55     JOHNSON                                 02                               MW 9:40-10:40;TR 10:05-11:30       SWOFFER-PENNA                              03                          MW 10:50-11:50;TR 10:05-11:30                     JOHNSON

Second part of communication-based foundation course.  Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. Students with credit for FREN 115 or equivalent may not take this course. PREREQUISITE: FRENCH 111 OR MAXIMUM TWO YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL FRENCH. NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS OR THOSE WITH PRIOR KNOWLEDGE OF THE LANGUAGE.  Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html

Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

 

FREN 211 -01 FRENCH lll                             MWF 9:40-10:40                             JOHNSON                          02                                                   MWF 10:50-11:50                            CLARKE                             03                                                  MWF 8:30-9:30                                   HASSELL           First part of communication-based intermediate-level French. Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. PREREQUISITE: FREN 115 OR MAXIMUM THREE YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL FRENCH. NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS. Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html.  Students may be removed from this course if theyexceed the appropriate level of experience.   

FREN 215 -01 FRENCH IV                             TR 10:05-11:30                  BOSWORTH                  Second part of communication-based intermediate-level French.  Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. PREREQUISITE: FREN 211 OR MORE THAN THREE YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL FRENCH. NOT FOR HERITAGE/NATIVE FRENCH SPEAKERS. Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html.  Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

 

FREN 241 CONV/COMP/CIV                         MW 5:50-7:15                POLACHEK                      Discussions of current issues in French culture and civilization, short literary works, songs, and visual materials, with reinforcement of selected grammatical structures. Course designed to strengthen skills in speaking, oral comprehension, reading and writing.  An important course for further French studies and/or study abroad. Format: Class conducted in French.  Grade based on active class participation, including oral presentation. Written work includes short compositions and two exams.  PREREQUISITE One of the following:  French 215 or the equivalent; four years of high school French; AP score of 4 or IB score of 5; or permission of instructor.

FREN 351 ADVANCED GRAMMAR            TR 4:25-5:50                  BOSWORTH                       This course aims at a systematic examination and reinforcement of a broad range of advanced aspects of French grammar, accompanied by regular discussions of current events and cultural topics. Classes will consist of review and analysis of assigned grammar points, exercises targeting relevant grammatical structures, analytical exercises conducted in small groups, and individual presentations of selected current event topics. PREREQUISITE: FREN 241 or 251, or equivalent. 

 

FREN 381A  AMONG THE ANIMALS             TR 6:00-7:25               PATTERSON                      This survey course will cover movements in French literature, culture and thought from the Middle Ages to the present through the thematic lens of the animal. From medieval werewolves and moral-political fables to contemporary graphic novels and the animal rights movement, we will study stories, poems, films and art that ask us to consider humanity’s animal nature, relationships between humans and animals, and the ethics of those relationships, from literary and artistic as well as scientific and philosophical perspectives. Through this survey, students will also gain a foundation in French literary history and criticism in preparation for 400-level classes. Course taught in French. PREREQUISITES: One 300-level course strongly recommended, or permission of the instructor. 

FREN 480A/580A/ ling 480C     FRENCH IN NORTH AMERICA    TR 2:50-4:15                           BOSWORTH

This course is an introduction to the historical context and linguistic features of the main varieties of French spoken in North America. The journey begins with an overview of the history of the French language in France, and continues to the North-American continent. Four dialects of French are in focus: le québécois, l’acadien, le français de la Nouvelle-Angleterre, et le cadien (la Louisiane). This course also makes a brief voyage to the Caribbean, introducing students to le créole haïtien. Class sessions consist of interactive review and discussion of material covered in readings and exercises in linguistic analysis. Classes are conducted in French at the appropriate level of complexity; students should expect to regularly engage in pair, small group and whole class discussion in French. Evaluation is based on in-class engagement, regular content quizzes, written homework, and a research project presented at the end-of-the semester. Students from other departments may do their written work in English if permitted by their department. PREREQUISITES: Two 300-level courses. Interested students with only one 300-level course should consult the instructor.

 

FREN 481G/581G/     FRENCH WOMEN WRITERS: THE DYNAMICS OF DESIRE                                  POLACHEK

coli483F/5345D/eng430N/wggs 480C                            MW 7:25-8:50               

Does women’s writing offer the reader a distinctly different vision of female passion? Do their visual creations (e.g. painting, film) reflect something unexpected?  Using as a starting point the male construction of female love as excessive, anguished and overwhelming, we will engage in close readings of women’s writing from the 16h through the 21st centuries to see  ways in which such notions are reflected or challenged in the fictions women create. Is there a markedly female handling of themes such as infidelity, unreciprocated love, sexuality and madness?  How do treatments of these themes relate to issues of historical moment, social class, culture and race?  Books: authors to be read include  Louise Labé, Marguerite de Navarre, Mme de Lafayette, Marie Riccoboni  Colette, Marie Cardinal, and Yasmina Reza  Format: Readings and class discussions in French; qualified students from other disciplines are welcome and their written work may be in English, if their department permits. Class conducted as a seminar. Grade based on regular, active participation, including oral presentations. Written work includes two papers (for graduate students, one will be a research project on a topic of interest related to the course’s focus). Prerequisites: two 300-level courses (preferably one language, one literature) or the equivalent or permission of instructor.

                                                 FALL 2016 – ITALIAN

 

   ITAL 111 -01    ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I        MW 8:30-9:30;TR 8:30-9:55        COOK, M                     -02                                                  MW 9:40-10:40;TR 10:05-11:30          COOK, M

                 -03                                                  MW 10:50-11:50;TR 11:40-1:05           LEE                             -04                                                    MW 1:10-2:10;TR 1:15-2:40                 ROSELLE                   -05                                                    MW 12:00-1:00;TR 1:15-2:40               LEE         

First part of communication-based foundation course.  Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. PREREQUISITE: NO PREVIOUS TRAINING IN ITALIAN OR MAXIMUM ONE YEAR IN HIGH SCHOOL. NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS OR THOSE WITH PRIOR KNOWLEDGE OF THE LANGUAGE. Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html .Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

ITAL 115 -01 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN II             MW 8:30-9:30;TR 8:30-9:55          LEE           
                -02                                                           MW 10:50-11:50;TR 11:40-1:05     SAMIANI

                -03                                                                MW 12:00-1:00;TR 1:15-2:40    COOK, M  Second part of communication-based foundation course.  Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. Students with credit for ITAL 115 or equivalent may not take this course.  PREREQUISITE: ITALIAN 111 OR MAXIMUM TWO YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL ITALIAN. NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS OR THOSE WITH PRIOR KNOWLEDGE OF THE LANGUAGE.  Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html . Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

ITAL 181A -01 ITALIAN FOR TRAVELERS “O”          T 6:00-9:00           HENNESSEY              In this course you will learn some of the basics of how to communicate in Italian, with an emphasis on things like directions, making plans, ordering food, etc. You will also be introduced to the various regions of Italy, and will have an opportunity to study some cities and regions in more depth. You will learn through online and in-class activities, dialogues, role play, video clips, etc

ITAL 211 -01 INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I                MWF 8:30-9:30               MORONI                                02                                                                MWF 9:40-10:40           MORONI

First part of communication-based intermediate-level Italian. Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. PREREQUISITE: ITAL 115 OR MAXIMUM THREE YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL ITALIAN. NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS. Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html.  Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

ITAL 215 -01 INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II               MWF 12:00-1:00            SAMIANI               Second part of communication-based intermediate-level Italian. Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out.  PREREQUISITE: ITAL 211, OR MORE THAN THREE  YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL ITALIAN.  NOT FOR HERITAGE/NATIVE ITALIAN SPEAKERS. Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html.  Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

 

ITAL 241 CONV/ COMP                                      TR 1:15-2:40                          SAMIANI           Intermediate-level course that focuses on the development of oral and written language skills through a variety of means, including Italian songs, movies and readings that reflect cultural topics of modern Italy. Conducted in Italian. FORMAT: Grade based on regular attendance, participation, quizzes, tests and assignments. PREREQUISITE: ITAL 215 or equivalent.


ITAL 481E/581H ITALIAN AND FOOD         TR 4:25-5:50             HENNESSEY                        
This course surveys the production and presentation of cuisine in Italian film, television, literature, and society. Italy is regarded as a center of Mediterranean culinary tradition and quality. The export of staples (olive oil, tomato sauce, cheese, wine), globalized foods (pizza, espresso), and culinary movements such as Slow Food constitute key components of Italian economic and cultural influence. From the examination of nourishment’s symbolic weight in both secular and religious texts to the rise of the televised celebrity chef, food, cooking, and eating will provide gateways for understanding notions of Italian gender, family, local, and international identity in the 20th and 21st centuries.       

ITAL 481L/581L  LOVE, SCIENCE, MAGIC    M 6:00-9:00             STEWART  coli480Z/531B/mdvl481V/560B                               
What is love? Medieval authors attempted to answer this question by drawing on knowledge from all spheres, including science. In this course we will read scientific and literary works as we consider the medieval views on such topics as the nature of lovesickness, the psychology of desire, the physics of love at first sight, the power of demons, and the magical properties of crystals. From Arthurian Romance to lyric poetry and bawdy short stories, we'll see how authors of all types of literature in the Middle Ages incorporated elements from both science and magic into their writings.

                                           

SPAN 111 -01  ELEMENTARY SPANISH I  MW 8:30-9:30;TR 8:30-9:55      SAMIANI                                02                                                   MW 9:40-10:40;TR 10:05-11:30  TOTOLIS                              03                                                  MW 10:50-11:50;TR 11:40-1:05    TOTOLIS           First part of communication-based foundation course.  Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. PREREQUISITE: NO PREVIOUS TRAINING IN SPANISH OR MAXIMUM ONE YEAR IN HIGH SCHOOL. NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS OR THOSE WITH PRIOR KNOWLEDGE OF THE LANGUAGE.  Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html .Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experienc

SPAN 115 -01  ELEMENTARY SPANISH II MW 8:30-9:30;TR 8:30-9:55       TOTOLIS                                02                                                   MW 8:30-9:30;TR 8:309:55       HAMDAN                                03                                                   MW 9:40-10:40;TR 10:05-11:30 HAMDAN            Second part of communication-based foundation course.  Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. Students with credit for SPAN 115 or equivalent may not take this course. PREREQUISITE: SPANISH 111 OR MAXIMUM TWO YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL SPANISH. NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS OR THOSE WITH PRIOR KNOWLEDGE OF THE LANGUAGE.  Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html . Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

SPAN 175 MEDICAL SPANISH                    TR 11:40-1:05              COOK, S                               This course will enable students in the medical fields to communicate with the increasing Spanish-speaking population. The course has a Spanish grammar component, an introduction to cultural awareness in health care and basic vocabulary needed for communication pertinent to medical issues, such as general expressions used to gather basic information from a patient, parts of the body and description of symptoms.   

SPAN 211-01 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I MWF 8:30-9:30          ALONSO                                                  02                                                   MWF 9:40-10:40        ALONSO                                                   03                                                   MWF 10:50-11:50      ALONSO                                                 04                                               MWF 12:00-1:00            ALONSO                                                05                                                 MWF 9:40-10:40         CASTANEDA                                             06                                                TR   4:25-5:50              KAPRAL                                                      07                                              MW    5:50-7:15             BEDRIN                                                  08                                                   MW    7:25-8:50            BEDRIN                                                09                                                   TR      6:00-7:25             KAPRAL                              First part of communication-based intermediate-level Spanish. Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. PREREQUISITE: SPAN 115 OR MAXIMUM THREE YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL SPANISH.  NOT OPEN TO HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS. Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.htmlStudents may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

 SPAN 212 SPANISH GRAMMAR FOR BILINGUALS        MWF 9:40-10:40         VOGELY       For students raised in a bilingual environment; although some competence with spoken Spanish is presumed, no specific degree of proficiency is required. Concentrates on basic grammar, syntax, reading and writing. FORMAT: Grade based on quizzes and examinations, homework, written assignments and class participation.

 

SPAN 215 -01  INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II          MWF 10:50-11:50     VOGELY                                         02                                                               TR     4:25-5:50          BEDRIN                                         03                                                               TR     6:00-7:25            BEDRIN                                      04                                                               MWF 1:10-2:10        CASTENEDA                                    05                                                               MWF 2:20-3:20          CASTANEDA            Second part of communication-based intermediate-level Spanish. Reading, writing, listening comprehension and speaking skills emerge through practice in class and out. PREREQUISITE: SPAN 211, OR MORE THAN THREE YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL SPANISH. NOT FOR HERITAGE/NATIVE SPANISH SPEAKERS.                  Please consult the department's language placement guidelines found at

http://www.binghamton.edu/romance/placement.html .  Students may be removed from this course if they exceed the appropriate level of experience.

 

SPAN 250 -01   ADVANCED GRAMMAR                MWF 8:30-9:30     COOK, S                         

                    02                                                              MWF 9:40-10:40      COOK, S                                          03                                                              MWF 10:50-11:50   CASTANEDA               Students achieve accuracy of expression through emphasis on correct grammatical expression. Proficiency in the use of subject-verb and noun-adjective agreement and beginning ability to accurately use the subjunctive mood and appropriate choice of Spanish prepositions. Additionally, this course broadens students' active vocabulary and knowledge in contemporary culture.  Required for the major for non-native speakers of Spanish. PREREQUISITE: SPAN 215 or equivalent. NOT FOR HERITAGE/NATIVE SPEAKERS FLUENT IN WRITEN AND ORAL SPANISH.  Required for the major.

 

SPAN 251 -01 ADVANCED WRITING AND DEBATE        MWF 10:50-11:50       COOK, S.                         02                                                                           MWF  1:10-2:10  PIGNATIELLLO                     03                                                                           MWF  2:20-3:20   PIGNATIELLO   Continuation of SPAN 250.  In preparation for the 300 level courses, Span 251 will focus on improving students’ writing and argumentation skills through several oral and written assignments, as well as introduce the basics of academic writing. Students will practice the different components of debate, such as formulating opinions, analyzing information, and interpreting non-fiction and fictional texts. Class and small-group discussion of topics selected for compositions that require a moderately sophisticated use of vocabulary and syntactical and grammatical structures. Open to all students.  Required for the major.  PREREQUISITE: SPAN 250 or 212 or equivalent (sequential after SPAN 250). Required for the major.

 

SPAN 344 -01 /lacs 344  ADVANCED READING AND INTERPRETATION
TR 1:15-2:40                           FAJARDO

 

SPAN 344 -02/lacs 3344                                                                             
TR 8:30-9:55                           ROS
Students participate in and contribute to sophisticated classroom discussions of the readings and present their work orally. Gain ability to recognize and explain the whole range of grammatical usage as well as ability to recognize basic rhetorical figures and tropes. Read and understand works of literature -- poetry, prose, drama, essay--with a minimum of lexical, cultural and historical aids necessary for understanding. Specific application of general writing skills to literary genres and topics, with emphasis on clarity of thinking as the means leading to accuracy of expression. Required for the major. PREREQUISITE: SPAN 251 or equivalent.

SPAN 350 -01 ADVANCED SPANISH CONVERSATION  TR 10:05-11:30    SOBEJANO           This course will focus on controversial topics and universal themes that engage students in exciting and dynamic conversations and discussions.  To facilitate this discussion, we will introduce some literary texts –poems and short stories- that deal with the same topics of discussion and themes.

PREREQUISITES:  SPAN 250 and 251 or equivalent or permission of instructor

 

SPAN 351/ling380K  INTRODUCTON TO SPANISH LINGUISTICS        TR 6:00-7:25                       KIRSCHEN  

This course serves as an introduction to the field of Spanish Linguistics. We begin by discussing fundamental theories related to how one acquires a language. Taking Spanish as the primary language of exploration, we review various linguistic fields throughout the semester, including phonetics (the sounds of a language), phonology (the interaction and organization of sounds), morphology (the structure of words), and syntax (the structure of sentences). Our course will also provide an overview of the historical development of the Spanish language, including regional variation today. This course will be taught in Spanish. Prerequisite:  SPAN 251.


SPAN 360/mvl360    HISPANIC CULTURE           MW 5:50-7:15                   MONTENEGRO
Selected readings and visual material that allow students to understand historical, political, geographical, and cultural developments in Hispanic societies, from the Middle ages to the present, from a transatlantic perspective. This course builds on the analytical skills and clarity of thinking developed in Span 344, as a means of perfecting oral and written communication. Students are expected to participate actively and effectively in class through small group activities and presentations. Required for the major. PREREQUISITE: Required for the major. SPAN 251 or equivalent. This course can be taken simultaneously with but not after Span 37

SPAN 370/lacs370   HISPANIC LITERATURE                    TR 10:05-11:30                 ROS
Hispanic literature from the Middle Ages to the present. Ability to participate in and to contribute actively and comfortably to classroom, as well as small-group discussions of sophisticated topics with minimal loss of communication due to inadequate control of grammatical structures. Building on the skills and knowledge developed in the study of literary themes and topics in SPAN 344, this course will emphasize the interrelationship of analytical skills and clarity of thinking as the means of developing a personal style of expression. Required for the major. PREREQUISITE: SPAN 344 or equivalent. Spanish 360 and 370 can be taken simultaneously but 360 cannot be taken after 370.


SPAN 382A BUSINESS SPANISH                            TR 1:15-2:40                         SOBEJANO
Main objective is mastery of written and oral proficiency in Spanish for commercial use and emphasis on the acquisition of new vocabulary related to the business world. Studying new terminology and understanding business concepts is an important aspect. Another aspect is the focus on cross-cultural differences and understanding that are so important as a key to business success when dealing with other countries. FORMAT: Oral presentation, quizzes, discussion of different topics. PREREQUISITE: SPAN 250 or 251 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. NOT OPEN TO NATIVE SPEAKERS.

SPAN 480F/581C/ling 480V   SPANISH PHONETICS & PHONOLOGY  TR 2:50-4:15                       KIRSCHEN

This course will provide a systematic review of the Spanish sound system from the fields of phonetics, or how sounds are articulated, and phonology, or how sounds fit together in speech. Reviewing a number of Spanish dialects will allow us to understand how the language varies throughout the Spanish-speaking world. We will also examine the sound system of English, so as to explore the particular difficulties that sounds of Spanish present to English-speaking learners of the language. Additionally, this course will be practical for both second language learners as well as heritage and native speakers of Spanish, for both groups will acquire a greater understanding of the fields of phonetics and phonology in relation to the Spanish language. Second language learners will achieve a greater mastery of Spanish pronunciation, providing them with the ability to continuously improve their pronunciation beyond this course. Native and heritage speakers will also benefit from this course by becoming cognizant of regional variation and registers within the language, allowing them to better understand their own variety of Spanish. This course will be taught in Spanish.  Prerequisite: at least one 300 level course in Spanish required, a course in linguistics is recommended

SPAN 481B/581F FEMNISM IN THE 19C. WOMEN WRITERS OF SPAIN                                               FAJARDO

                                                                                                                           TR 4:25-5:50
This course will examine Spanish women writers of the 19th Century from both a literary and a cultural point of view. We will consider whether some of the texts may be viewed as proto-feminist, and discuss the position of women in a traditional, patriarchal society where, though they were infrequently encouraged as writers, they became actively engaged in the issues of the day both as women and artists.


SPAN 483F/581I/lacs 483B    BANG, BANG THEORY: CRIME AND DETECTIVE                 PIGNATIELLO

FICTION IN THE   SOUTHERN CONE                                                           MW 7:25-8:50
Trappers, pathfinders, sheriffs, private eyes, criminals, bandits, gangsters, preachers, priests, journalists, and writers inhabit one of the most popular genres in the Southern Cone: crime/detective fiction. This course presents a history of this form in both literature and film in the three countries of the Southern Cone: Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay. We will cover its main productions since the mid 19th century until the present, and we will focus on the relationship between fictional form and history. Throughout the course, students will study and analyze different tropes and topics of this particular genre and their relation with the state and society, borders and frontiers, private property, and the law in the specific context of this region in Latin America.

PREREQUISITE: SPAN 360 or 370 (or equivalent).

 

 

 

Last Updated: 10/21/16