Active Alert: Classes canceled rest of today and tomorrow

B-ALERT:Due to forecast, all classes effective 4:30pm today Nov 25 are canceled. There will be no classes Wednesday Nov 26. Adjust travel plans accordingly.

Alert updated: Tuesday, November 25, 2014 3:50 PM

Transdisciplinary Areas of ExcellenceCitizenship, Rights and Cultural Belonging

Archived relevant events

Past events and speakers of interest to the Citizenship, Rights and Cultural Belonging Transdisciplinary Area of Excellence

Quick Conversations: Research and Scholarship event

The Citizenship, Rights and Cultural Belonging Transdisciplinary Area of Excellence is sponsoring a faculty networking event for faculty interested in its research topics and themes from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday, April 25. See our research themes as an introduction or reminder of the themes. The event, which includes lunch, is modeled on "speed dating." To participate, RSVP to ami@binghamton.edu by Monday, April 7. For planning purposes, if you cannot attend the entire time, specify when you will be there. Come prepared with a 120-second "elevator pitch" description of your current or future research or scholarship ideas. Read more

"A Common Denominator? The Making of Religious Peace in Sixteenth-Century Augsburg"

Sean Dunwoody, visiting assistant professor of medieval and early modern studies at Binghamton University, will speak on "A Common Denominator? The Making of Religious Peace in Sixteenth-Century Augsburg" at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 5, in the IASH Conference Room, LN-1106, on the Binghamton University campus.The German city of Augsburg offers an interesting case study that confounds familiar stories about religious violence in the early modern period. In the sixteenth century, when religious identity and religious bigotry drove communities across Europe into civil and religious war, Augsburgers— Catholic and Protestant—remained largely at peace. Realizing that religious uniformity was impossible in their town, Augsburgers felt their way toward a means of mutual toleration and the civic peace that, in the end, offered a common ground between the religious and other differences. In this talk, Dunwoody will offer an introduction to some of the ways in which this was done — with a focus on the importance of spatial management and on the relations between civil authorities and the clergy. In both cases, we will see how and why Augsburgers saw in differentiating religion and politics the means for achieving the common, worthy goal of civic peace.

Last Updated: 6/22/14