Human Development - College of Community and Public Affairs

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Programs

Binghamton University’s College of Community and Public Affairs (CCPA) provides an array of programs for undergraduate and graduate students and prepares its graduates to work with individuals, communities and organizations for the public good, focusing specifically on social services, local government and non-profit organizations.

The Department of Human Development offers an undergraduate program leading to the bachelor of science (BS) in human development.

The College of Community and Public Affairs offers an interdisciplinary doctoral program leading to the PhD in Community and Public Affairs.

The Department of Public Administration offers a graduate program leading to the master of public administration (MPA) degree.

The Department of Social Work offers both full-time and part-time graduate programs leading to the master of social work (MSW) degree.

The Department of Student Affairs Administration offers a graduate program leading to the master of science (MS) in student affairs administration.

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Human Development

The human development bachelor's program allows students to explore individual, social and structural aspects of human development as a basis of understanding principles that benefit themselves and others by (a) achieving a solid foundation in the theories and research defining the field of human development; (b) engaging in a critical exploration of social, cultural, economic, historical and political frameworks and the ways in which individuals, families and communities are situated within them; (c) developing the understanding and skills needed to enhance and promote diversity, equity and social justice; and (d) fostering a complex understanding of human conditions.

Our courses stress collaborative education and a multicultural curriculum, and our faculty strive to build supportive relationships with and among our students.

Learning objectives woven throughout our flexible curriculum encourage students to:

  • think critically;
  • analyze social issues;
  • effectively express ideas verbally and in writing;
  • apply knowledge by linking theory and practice;
  • understand and use technology;
  • develop an understanding of self and others as situated in history and community;
  • develop an understanding for global-local issues and relations of power;
  • develop a human rights based perspective to the empowerment of individuals and communities;
  • demonstrate an understanding of how oppression affects the process of development;
  • demonstrate knowledge, sensitivity and skill in working with diverse populations;
  • and engage in a critical analysis of the concept of human service in the social and institutional context of politics, history and economics.

Courses are situated in the social sciences, but also cross these and other disciplinary boundaries, applying what students learn to a variety of human services settings, including social services, schools, child-care organizations, the criminal justice system, healthcare agencies, mental health programs, community development organizations, and many others for which a human development understanding provides a useful grounding.

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Admission

The procedure for candidates applying for admission to the College of Community and Public Affairs (CCPA) is essentially the same as for other students applying for admission to the University. Specific information may be found in the general section on Admission in this publication.

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Undergraduate Academic Policies

The college generally follows the academic policies announced in this publication; however, students should be aware of the following policies pertinent to CCPA undergraduates only. Students are expected to be familiar with and to observe the regulations in this section.

All matriculated students follow the requirements for graduation listed in the Bulletin current at the time they are admitted to the degree program. However, students who interrupt enrollments for more than two consecutive semesters are governed by the Bulletin in effect when they are readmitted.

Upon the advisor’s recommendation and an approved petition through the human development department chair, students may elect a later Bulletin under which they fulfill these degree requirements; however, they may not use a combination of requirements from different Bulletins. When courses required in older Bulletins are no longer offered, or in other special cases, course substitution may be made with the approval of the human development department chair.

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Program Load and Planning

The term “full-time student” is applied to a person carrying 12 credits or more. The maximum number of credits a student may take, without the special approval of the advisor and department chair, is 18.

A student may drop below 12 credits without consent and be classified as a part-time student.

Students are enrolled in a major when accepted into the school. The CCPA undergraduate academic advisor, peer advisors and the Human Development department chair provide assistance in program planning for students.

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Grade Policies

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Grading System

Students taking CCPA undergraduate courses are graded in one of two ways:

  • A, A–, B+, B, B–, C+, C, C–, D, F; or
  • Pass/Fail.

Under the normal grading system, students choose the first option. However, undergraduates in CCPA may elect the Pass/Fail option for a total of four courses while a student at Binghamton University and receive a P (pass) or F (fail) rather than a traditional grade. Courses taken for a Pass/Fail option may not be used to complete major requirements or the general education requirements. Mandatory Pass/Fail courses do not count as part of the four total courses. A course taken on the Pass/Fail option is calculated into the student’s grade-point average only if the student receives an F.

The grading option for a course may be changed (either from normal to Pass/Fail, or vice versa) at any time up until the course-withdraw deadline, usually during the ninth week of the semester.

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Repeating Courses

Students may retake courses in which they have received a passing grade, or C or better in core courses required for the Human Development major, by submitting a special petition to the faculty member teaching the course and the CCPA undergraduate academic advisor. This provision allows a student to demonstrate mastery of a given subject matter most notably (but not exclusively) in foundation courses, on which successful performance in later courses may depend. If approved, the repeated course does not count toward rate of progress. That is, when a student repeats a course previously passed, both grades appear on the transcript, but only the first grade is counted in the grade-point average (GPA) calculations for rate-of-progress purposes.

Students may retake courses in which they have received a failing grade, or below the minimum required grade of C in core courses required for the Human Development major. When a student repeats a course previously failed or below the minimum grade of C in core courses required for the HDEV major, both grades appear on the transcript, and both are counted in the GPA. Students are encouraged to speak with the CCPA undergraduate academic advisor as they make their decision about repeating any failed course.

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Notation of Incomplete

A notation of Incomplete, rather than a grade, may be reported by the instructor when a student has made substantial progress, but has not been able to complete a course. In addition, the student must have a valid reason, because of illness or other justifiable circumstances, for requesting an Incomplete. The questions of substantial progress, potential to pass the course, and a valid reason for the request are decided by the instructor. When requesting an Incomplete, the student must:

  • complete the Contract for Fulfilling an Incomplete form, which is signed by the student and the instructor;
  • specify in the contract how the course will be completed, by what date the work will be completed, and specifically list all outstanding assignments (tests, papers, presentations) to be completed;
  • submit the contract to the CCPA undergraduate academic advisor, who ensures that the student is in compliance with Department of Human Development rules governing the number of Incomplete credits a student may carry at one time. A student may not carry more than eight credits of Incompletes at any time;
  • when necessary, include the signature of any additional instructor needed for successful completion of the course. This circumstance may occur when the original faculty member is on sabbatical or no longer teaching the course. A student must first obtain the secondary instructor’s signature before having the original instructor sign the form.

An Incomplete becomes an F at the end of the semester following that in which the Incomplete was granted, unless a Change of Grade form is submitted by the instructor. It is the student’s responsibility to ascertain that the coursework has been completed according to the contract, and the new grade is submitted by the instructor. An extension of the deadline must be approved by the CCPA undergraduate academic advisor on a Request for Extension of Incomplete Grade in an Undergraduate Course form, and is approved only in highly unusual circumstances.

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Withdrawal from a Course

If a student withdraws from a course after the official deadline to drop a course, the instructor may assign a grade of WP (Withdrawn Passing) or WF (Withdrawn Failing). The grade of WP does not count as a course taken. A WF is equivalent to an F.

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Grade Changes

No changes from one letter grade to another and no extensions of an Incomplete are permitted after 12 months from the date of the last day of class in the semester in which a course was offered.

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Academic Standing

The faculty in the Department of Human Development in the College of Community and Public Affairs (CCPA) expect academic excellence for our students.

Students in human development must maintain a minimum of a 2.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) to make satisfactory progress toward the BS or BA degree. A minimum of a 2.0 cumulative GPA is required of students for graduation.

The GPA is calculated on a 4.0 system using the following grade-point equivalents:

A

=

4.0

C+

=

2.3

A–

=

3.7

C

=

2.0

B+

=

3.3

C–

=

1.7

B

=

3.0

D

=

1.0

B–

=

2.7

F

=

0.0

The assessment of satisfactory progress to degree will be conducted for students at the end of the fall and spring semesters. The failure to maintain a minimum of a 2.0 cumulative GPA at the end of a semester will result in the student’s academic probation. As such, an academic probation notation will be placed on the student’s internal academic transcript.

Students who do not achieve a minimum of a cumulative 2.0 GPA in a subsequent semester following academic probation may be subject to academic suspension from Binghamton University. An academic suspension notation will be placed on a student’s internal academic transcript. Students that receive academic suspension may be readmitted to the University after one year. Please note that students may be re-admitted to the University after one semester upon the successful completion of 12 credits or more with earning a grade of B or better in all courses taken at an accredited college or university.

Students who do not have the minimum of a 2.0 cumulative GPA in the semester following academic suspension, or any subsequent semester, may be subject to permanent academic dismissal from the University. Please note that a student will not be suspended or dismissed if the student’s semester GPA is greater than a 2.0 GPA.

In cases where students demonstrate continuous unsatisfactory academic performance, including but not limited to, a consistent pattern of failing grades, multiple withdrawals and/or a low cumulative GPA, these circumstances may result in receiving a letter of academic warning. The letter of academic warning will indicate that academic probation will occur in the event that the student does not improve his/her academic performance in a subsequent semester. Those students that continue to demonstrate unsatisfactory academic performance in any subsequent semester may be subject to academic probation followed by academic suspension and ultimately academic dismissal from the University.

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Dean’s List

To qualify for the CCPA Dean’s List at the end of the fall or spring semesters, a human development student must have completed at least 16 credit hours for a letter grade with a 3.75 or better semester GPA and have no missing or incomplete grades. Recognition is given for each semester in which students meet these criteria. The award is noted on the student’s academic transcript.

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Graduation with Honors

Human Development students with outstanding academic records receive honors upon graduation. To qualify, students must meet the cumulative grade-point averages specified below, have at least 48 graded Binghamton University credits and have no missing grades or Incompletes. Honors are awarded as follows:

3.50-3.69 GPA: cum laude

3.70-3.84 GPA: magna cum laude

3.85-4.00 GPA: summa cum laude

The appropriate graduation honors are indicated on the diploma and on the final transcript.

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Withdrawal and Readmission

If students who withdraw from the College of Community and Public Affairs wish to remain in good standing, they must follow a formal withdrawal procedure. Mere absence from class does not constitute withdrawal. Withdrawal applications may be obtained from the Registrar's Office website under Forms or from the CCPA Undergraduate Academic Advising Office, either in person or through the mail. A grade of W is assigned when the student has withdrawn from all courses and thus from the University. Grades of W do not count as courses taken.

CCPA applies the same withdrawal and readmission policies as established for the University, except that CCPA students may drop below a three-course program without consent.

Undergraduate students must apply for readmission through the Undergraduate Admissions Office.

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Grievance Procedure

Students should first try to resolve any grievance with their instructor. If, after meeting with the course instructor, the student wishes to pursue further action, he or she should meet with the Human Development department chair to discuss options. A copy of the CCPA Grievance Procedure is available from any of the above or from the CCPA Dean’s Office.

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Financial Aid

College of Community and Public Affairs students are eligible to participate in the University’s financial aid program. Aid is available to full-time and selected part-time matriculated students. Students interested in obtaining financial aid should contact the Financial Aid and Student Records Office as soon as possible to determine their eligibility.

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Activities and Student Services

All CCPA students are eligible to receive the services provided for all students at Binghamton University and to participate in its various student activities. Students should be familiar with the Bulletin sections that deal with services for students and student activities.

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Awards and Prizes

See the Scholarships, Awards and Fellowships section of the University Bulletin.

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Undergraduate Major Program

The Department of Human Development offers the bachelor of science in human development. This undergraduate degree is designed to prepare students for careers in which they will work with people, in communities and organizations, addressing complex social problems such as poverty, drug and alcohol abuse, victimization, equity and justice. Students design their own individualized plans of interdisciplinary study within the general framework of the program requirements based upon their specific personal, educational and career goals.

The undergraduate curriculum is organized in three core areas: (1) Theories of Human Development, (2) Social Action and Policy, and (3) Working with Individuals and Groups. Theoretical courses examine core concepts that relate to human development across the lifespan including but not limited to child and adolescent development, as well as death, dying and bereavement. Social Action and Policy courses explore how the influence of macro- and micro-level processes interface individuals and communities. Working with Individuals and Groups courses examine the philosophies, strategies and techniques for working effectively with individuals, organizations and communities; they also emphasize sociocultural factors that influence practice.

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Required Course Prerequisites

The following courses are required prerequisites to begin the major in Human Development: three lower-level social science courses (any 100- or 200-level) including psychology, sociology and another social science course outside of psychology and sociology (e.g., anthropology, political science, history, economics, etc.). Once these courses are completed with a grade of C or better, and once students have sufficient credit hours to constitute sophomore 2 standing, they are eligible to take HDEV 200, the first course in Human Development.

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Degree Requirements

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Credit Requirements to Qualify for a Baccalaureate Degree from CCPA

Liberal Arts and Sciences 60 cr.
Upper Division - 300 and 400 level courses in HDEV (includes HDEV 200 taken as 2nd semester sophomore or higher) 40 cr.
In Residence - courses satisfactorily completed in HDEV department 40 cr.
Total Required for graduation 124 cr. (minimum)
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Other Requirements to Qualify for a Baccalaureate Degree from CCPA

  • Earn a minimum of 124 credit hours, including transfer credits, with a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 and a minimum GPA of at least 2.0 in the major program.
  • No more than eight credit hours in internship and independent study courses may be applied toward the 124 credit total for degree.
  • No more than ten credit hours of health and wellness (HWS) courses and up to 2 credits of outdoor pursuit courses (OUT) having a general education designation, may be applied toward the 124-credit total for degree. Outdoor pursuit courses that do not meet the general education requirement will not count toward the degree. For transfer students, eight credits of wellness courses and two credits of physical activity courses may be applied toward the degree.
  • Meet general education requirements as stated elsewhere in this document.
  • Complete the specified requirements in the major program in which they are candidates for the degree.
  • Not be on probation or under disciplinary action, and pay or make a satisfactory adjustment of all tuition, fees or other bills incident to their attendance at the University.
  • Be recommended by the faculty of the College of Community and Public Affairs.
  • Be admitted to the degree by the State University Trustees, by formal action.

The College of Community and Public Affairs (CCPA) reserves the right to make changes in the requirements listed above for graduation, except that no increase in total credit hours required for graduation shall retroactively affect any student already matriculated in CCPA when the change is made.

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Health and Wellness (HWS) Requirements

Ten elective credits of health and wellness (HWS) courses may be applied toward the degree. Up to 2 credits of outdoor pursuit courses (OUT) with a General Education designation may be applied toward the degree. Outdoor pursuit courses without the General Education designation will not apply toward the degree. For transfer students, eight credits of wellness courses and two credits of physical activity courses may be applied toward the degree.

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Independent and Internship Study Policy

Students are restricted to a maximum of eight credit-hours for independent study and internship courses toward the degree. Independent study or internship courses may be taken for 1-4 credits only. Specific academic guidelines for independent and internship study courses are available on the CCPA Human Development website or in the Department of Human Development.

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Major Course Requirements

A total of 10 four-credit human development courses are required for the human development major. Four core courses (HDEV 200, HDEV 300, HDEV 400, HDEV 475) and two courses from each of the Core Learning Areas (Theories of Human Development, Social Action and Policy, and Working with Individuals and Groups) are required for the human development major.

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Core Courses

Students will select three introductory classes from three different social science disciplines (one must be from psychology, one must be from sociology, one must be from a different social science discipline [i.e., anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science]). 12 cr.
HDEV 200. Introduction to Human Development 4 cr.
HDEV 300. Social Science Research Methods 4 cr.
HDEV 400. Social Justice 4 cr.
HDEV 475. Practicum in Human Development 4 cr.
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Core Learning Areas

Students are required to select two additional courses from each of the following three Core Learning Areas.
HDEV 301-339. Theories of Human Development 8 cr.
HDEV 340-379. Social Action and Policy 8 cr.
HDEV 401-479. Working with Individuals and Groups 8 cr.
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Sequencing of Core Courses

HDEV 200 (Introduction to Human Development) is a prerequisite for HDEV 300 (Social Science Research Methods). HDEV 300 is a prerequisite for HDEV 400 (Social Justice). HDEV 400 is a prerequisite for HDEV 475 (Practicum in Human Development). These courses cannot be taken simultaneously as each one provides a critical preparation for the subsequent course. In general, students will begin the sequence of courses when they have sufficient credit hours to constitute sophomore standing.

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Grade Policies for Core Courses

Core courses in human development (HDEV 200, HDEV 300, HDEV 400, HDEV 475) must be completed with a grade of C or better. Core courses may not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. All courses from the Core Learning Areas (Theories of Human Development, Social Action and Policy, and Working with Individuals and Groups) must be completed with a grade of C or better. Courses from the Core Learning Areas may not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.The three required lower division social sciences courses (psychology, sociology, and outside of social sciences) must be completed with a grade of C or better. These lower division social sciences courses may not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. For this requirement, please note that one course must be from psychology, one course must be from sociology, and one course must be from a different social science discipline (e.g., history, political science, geography, anthropology, economics).

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Core Course Learning Objectives

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Introduction to Human Development (HDEV 200)

In this course, students will:

  • Contextualize the history and evolution of the study of human development and the social sciences in the United States and internationally.
  • Examine the concept of development more broadly and across disciplines.
  • Explore the research approaches of the social science disciplines.
  • Understand interdisciplinarity and comprehend its significance for the study of human development.
  • Analyze the relevance of social science perspectives for the study of real world problems and social relations.
  • Understand the substantive and methodological programmatic underpinnings in the Department of Human Development, Binghamton University, including 1) critique of service, 2) multiculturalism, 3) translating theory into practice, and 4) action research.
  • Understand practice requires an equitable and socially just process.
  • Undertake the exercises of conducting library research, writing a literature review, and compiling a bibliography.
  • Receive feedback on the process of writing critically and have an opportunity to further develop skills in this area.
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Social Science Research Methods (HDEV 300)

In this course, students will:

  • Explore the different ways of knowing (epistemologies) including scientific research.
  • Understand the processes and institutions that are responsible for the production of social science research including the political contexts and processes of those institutions.
  • Examine the ethics of different research projects in their design and uses. Students will be introduced to human subjects protections and review.
  • Be introduced to the concepts of social science research, including hypothesis, measurement, reliability, measurement validity, design, sampling, sampling bias, and internal and external validity. They will also gain familiarity with some common fallacies including correlation versus causation, errors in logic, ad hoc explanations, and false generalization.
  • Learn about different philosophies and methodologies of quantitative and qualitative research, their advantages and disadvantages. Analysis will include the compatibility of different methodologies and how they frame the participants of their research.
  • Be introduced to participatory research strategies as a means to address some of the shortcomings of traditional research paradigms. Students will explore how researchers can be agents of social change.
  • Gain skills and confidence to find scholarly articles on a given topic, then read, evaluate, and critique the methods used in the articles. Learn how to read and provide a critique of quantitative and qualitative social science findings as reported in scholarly journals, but also in project reports, updates to funders, and the popular media (print, broadcast, Internet).
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Social Justice (HDEV 400)

In this course, students will:

  • Understand social justice in its forms including distributive (how resources are distributed), sense of justice (how justice and injustice feel), procedural (how one is treated), restorative (how remedies are made), and scope of justice (who is understood to be deserving).
  • Examine the dynamic variation across race, class, gender, ethnicity, disability, and sexuality identity formation, differential treatment based on marginalized identities at varying societal levels, and responses to the structural arrangements that affect people's lives within local and global contexts.
  • Develop critical consciousness and awareness of privilege in connection with dynamics of power and powerlessness that have an impact on the work of, and personal lives of practitioners in communities.
  • Demonstrate the acquisition and/or proficient use of analytical skills in terms of critically examining socio-historical, -cultural, -political, and -economic contexts.
  • Consider the meaning of justice in a global context by exploring the various consequences of globalization.
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Practicum in Human Development (HDEV 475)

In this course, students will:

  • Engage in a systematic internship process whereby student learning is maximized by simultaneously participating in fieldwork experiences, seminar activities, and by interacting with students working in a variety of other field settings.
  • Integrate theories in the study of human development with an understanding of practice in the human services from a critical perspective.
  • Develop multicultural competence in the areas of self-awareness, knowledge, and skills that enables an individual to work effectively as a practitioner in the field of human development and to understand how multi-layered constructions of difference affect the delivery of services.
  • Demonstrate an ability to provide a critique of service of micro- and macro-sociopolitical processes through an exploration of the impact of social structures and asymmetrical power relationships (i.e., political, economic, social, legal) in communities.
  • Evaluate how conceptions of empowerment and equity prevalent in the human development and related literatures actually play out in practice.
  • Explore the role of a social change agent and advocate in relation to institutional structures.
  • Discuss and analyze the internal practices of organizations and social service agencies.
  • Discuss and analyze the macro-level structures that influence organizational missions and practices.
  • Critically examine the concepts of empowerment, helping, intervention and service.
  • Understand the ethical considerations in a practicum experience as well as their consideration in organizations.
  • Gain an in-depth understanding of a human services practicum site, its "clients," various stakeholders, and programmatic goals.
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Core Learning Area Descriptions

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Theories of Human Development (HDEV 301-339)

Goal: Understanding theoretical orientations and applying knowledge to particular populations.

Courses in this area will examine human growth and development across the lifespan from conception to life’s ending. Students will learn about traditional as well as new directions in developmental theories. A solid grounding in a broad range of theories will provide a basic background for students’ work as practitioners across developmental domains such as physical, cognitive, and social emotional development. Students will learn foundational areas in traditional human developmental theories, place theories in historical context, and will discover the applications and limitations of theoretical concepts. Students will understand how theories develop, change and drive research, as well as how theories can be useful for understanding developmental trajectories. A key emphasis will be an application of developmental theories and concepts to work as practitioners. Students will examine how social context, as a major approach to the study of development, provides a central focus and understanding of people’s lives and their work as practitioners.

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Social Action and Policy (HDEV 340-379)

Goal: Influencing public discourse and the social world.

Courses in this area will explore the relationship between social policy, ideology, and activism. Students will be introduced to the processes that shape and develop social policy, including the historical background and competing societal values and interests that underlie enactment of social policy and the development of programs to address social problems. They will gain an understanding of the organizational, bureaucratic, political, and legislative processes that influence policy development and implementation. In addition, students will develop skills to critically evaluate existing policies and how those policies impact practice. This critical inquiry will lead students to consider the importance of social and institutional change through activist practice. Activism can be defined as participating in social issues discussions and activities within communities, organizations, and institutions. For some, this means working within institutions to make them live up to their objectives. These activists understand their role as making current social institutions work effectively and justly. For others, activism is social change that would involve the dismantling of current social institutions and replacing them with other visions. Students will have the opportunity to investigate how various strategies have developed to bring about meaningful social change within people’s lives and contexts.

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Working with Individuals and Groups (HDEV 401-479)

Goal: Learning professional skills and developing skill sets.

Courses in this area will introduce students to major principles and theories of individual and group practice. A key emphasis will be placed on integrating theory and practice and making applications of this learning to various kinds of work settings. Students will explore ethical, legal, and professional issues as well as major concepts, techniques and approaches used in individual and group practice. One of the central aims of courses in this area is to provide an interdisciplinary analysis of how individuals and groups function within families, institutions, and social structures. In this context, these courses will provide students with opportunities to move beyond more traditional principles of individualism and universalism through broadening the scope of interdisciplinary inquiry including exploring social stratifications and relations of power in individual and group identities. In particular, students will consider how people's daily life experiences as well as their individual psychologies (i.e., cognitions, attitudes, behaviors, challenges, emotions, expectations, motivations, needs, wants) and world view may be linked to structural differences in resources and opportunities, as well as assumptions about themselves and others.

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Human Development Minor in Immigration Studies

The Department of Human Development in the College of Community and Public Affairs offers a minor in Immigration Studies. The objective of this interdisciplinary minor is to grapple with the complex and multiple ways in which citizenship is defined and experienced at global, societal, institutional, community, and individual levels. The key focus is on the effect of contemporary conceptualizations of citizenship and their translation into policies and actual everyday practices on the lives of those deemed as immigrants, refugees, or the displaced. The minor applies a social justice and rights-based philosophy to an examination of citizenship, immigration, emigration, and immigrant lives in transnational, national, and local contexts. A key emphasis of the minor is to explore the intersectionality of discourses on belonging, justice, and displacement in a variety of global, national, and localized contexts.The requirements for the Human Development minor in Immigration Studies are as follows:

  • A minimum of six courses including four core courses and two elective courses.
  • The four core courses will be taken within the Department of Human Development:
    1. HDEV 361. Global Migration Flows and Processes
    2. HDEV 379. Migration, Citizenship, and Social Justice
    3. HDEV 465. Researching Immigrant Lives
    4. HDEV 475. Practicum in Human Development (this is the capstone course for the minor)
  • The two elective courses may be taken outside the Department of Human Development.
  • The two electives may be selected from courses that focus on immigration and immigrant related issues offered across BU in different departments. These courses must be approved by the Human Development department chair.
    1. The first elective course will focus on immigration/immigrants with a historical emphasis (e.g., courses in History; Sociology; Geography; English; Africana Studies; Latin American and Caribbean Area Studies; and Asian and Asian American Studies have been identified)
    2. The second elective will be a course that focuses in-depth on one specific immigrant community, population, or context (e.g., courses in History; Sociology; Geography; English; Africana Studies; Latin American and Caribbean Area Studies; and Asian and Asian American Studies have been identified)
  • For participation in the Human Development minor in Immigration Studies, a student must have declared a major (HDEV or other) and completed at least 60 credits.
  • For human development students, at least four of six courses for the Immigration Studies minor must be in addition to courses counted toward fulfillment of the human development major.
  • For students outside of human development, at least four of the six courses for the Immigration Studies minor must be in addition to courses counted toward the fulfillment of the student’s major.
  • At least four of the six courses for the Immigration Studies minor must be completed at Binghamton University.
  • Courses for the minor in Immigration Studies must be completed with a grade of C or better. These courses may not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.