School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

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Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program

The SOPPS currently offers a graduate-level pharmacy program culminating in the professional degree of Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD). This program will prepare graduates with the professional competencies for entry-level pharmacy practice in any setting; to ensure optimal medication therapy outcomes, patient safety and patient-centered team-based care; and to satisfy the educational requirements for licensure as a pharmacist. Binghamton’s program develops caring professionals with the knowledge, skills, attitudes and values required for the ethical and effective practice of pharmacy. The PharmD program has three objectives: (1) to educate skilled pharmacists to serve their communities with competence and compassion and in an ethical manner, (2) to promote public health by educating pharmacists to provide drug information and education and (3) to develop skills in pharmacy management, medication distribution and control and in counseling of patients on medications. 

The Binghamton University SOPPS PharmD program has been granted Precandidate status by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), 135 South LaSalle Street, Suite 4100, Chicago, IL 60503 (Phone: 312-644-3575; Fax: 312-664-4652; www.acpe-accredit.org).

On December 13, 2016, the New York State Board of Regents authorized Binghamton University to award the PharmD degree. The New York State Education Department reviewed the program and registered it for professional purposes on February 6, 2017.

 

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Admission

See the SOPPS page of the Admission section of the University Bulletin

 

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Additional Matriculation Requirements

Professional students in the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences must adhere to the following policies related to professional practice. Some policies will require students to pay additional fees.

Professional Ethics and Academic Honesty: Students are expected to comply with the University’s Rules for Student Conduct and the policies related to professional ethics, professional practice and academic honesty as stated in the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Student Handbook.

Program Fees: Students are required to pay fees that are associated with their professional development that are above and beyond tuition. Those fees include but are not limited to appropriate immunization costs, various clinical certification costs (diabetes care, medication therapy management and immunization certifications), CPR certification costs, simulation fees and third-party professional development software (like CORE-ELM) costs.

Malpractice and Liability Insurance: All students are required to obtain Pharmacist Professional Liability Insurance through the Healthcare Providers Service Organization (HPSO; http://www.hpso.com).

Health Insurance: All students enrolled in the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences are required to submit proof of personal health insurance. This documentation must be submitted prior to beginning any clinical experience. Failure to demonstrate evidence of health insurance will prevent the student from beginning clinical experiences in any semester. Health insurance is available for purchase through the University for those students who do not have coverage.

Drug Testing: Students are routinely required to undergo drug testing. Students will be asked to submit to drug testing prior to admission through PharmCAS and at the beginning of each academic year through the services of CertiPhi (https://www.certiphi.com). The student is responsible for all costs associated with these requirements. For more information about this process and its associated fees, please see the CertiPhi website (https://www.certiphi.com). All matriculated students assigned to an experiential site may be required by that site to submit to a drug test. The student will comply with directions given regarding the designated vendor and any appropriate follow-up that may be required. Although variable, most required panels test for amphetamines, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, cocaine, meperidine, methadone, oxycodone, opiates, phencyclidine and propoxyphene. Costs associated with the additional testing may be incurred by the students.

Criminal Background Checks: All School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences students are required to undergo a criminal background screening. Students will be asked to submit to a background check prior to admission through PharmCAS and at the beginning of each academic year through the services of CertiPhi (https://www.certiphi.com). The student is responsible for all costs associated with these requirements. For more information about this process and its fees, please see the CertiPhi website (https://www.certiphi.com).

Immunizations: Prior to enrollment, all students are required to submit immunizations to CertiPhi (https://www.certiphi.com). Pharmacy students will not be allowed to register for classes until they have fulfilled these requirements. The immunizations must include:

  • Influenza: Please provide documentation of a current flu vaccine.
  • Meningitis: Please provide documentation of a Meningitis (MCV4) vaccine administered. Vaccine must be within the past 5 years.
  • MMR: Please provide documentation of 2 MMR vaccines OR a positive quantitative antibody titer showing immunity. If the titer provided is negative or equivocal, students must repeat the 2-shot series AND provide a second titer.
  • Varicella (Chicken Pox): Please provide documentation of a positive quantitative titer showing immunity. Students with history of disease MUST demonstrate immunity by a quantitative titer. If the titer provided is negative or equivocal, students must repeat the 2-shot series AND provide a second titer.
  • TDAP: Please provide documentation of a TDAP vaccine administered within the past 10 years. If the TDAP vaccination is older than 10 years, please provide documentation of a current TD booster. Previous TDAP vaccinations must be provided in order for TD boosters to be accepted.
  • Hepatitis B: Please provide documentation of 3 Hepatitis B vaccines AND a positive quantitative antibody titer showing immunity. If the titer provided is negative or equivocal, students must repeat the 3-shot series AND provide a second titer. Students repeating the HEP B series will be marked complete at the first shot, but with an expiration date set for one month later when the second shot is due. Once the second shot is provided it will be marked complete, but with an expiration date set for 5 months later when the third shot is due. Once the third shot has been provided the requirement will be marked complete and an expiration date will be set for a month later when the final titer is due. Once a positive titer is provided an indefinite expiration date will be set. Example 01/01/2099.
  • PPD: Please provide documentation of a 1-step PPD test or Quantiferon TB Gold test. If test is positive, please provide documentation of a clear chest x-ray. Chest x-rays will be good for just one year.

 

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Program Requirements

The Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree program is a four-year course of study. The curriculum is designed to prepare students to become pharmacy practitioners who possess the knowledge and skills required to function as authorities on the use of medicines and who can apply pharmaceutical and biomedical science to the practical problems of drug therapy. Pharmacists are capable of contributing to the interdisciplinary delivery of primary health care and can function as drug therapy specialists. Students also are prepared for specialty professional studies and for graduate study in the pharmaceutical sciences.

Below is the required curriculum for the PharmD students. 

Year 1 (P1)

Fall

Course 

Hours

PHRM 501. Foundations I

5

PHRM 504. Integrated Pharmacotherapy I

3

PHRM 508. Professional Communications and Medical Info

2

PHRM 510. Health Care Delivery

3

PHRM 513. Pharmaceutics I

3

PHRM 514. Pharmaceutical Calculations I

1

PHRM 579a. Lifelong Learning

0

Subtotal

17

 

 

Spring

Course

Hours

PHRM 502. Foundations II

3

PHRM 503. Foundations III

2

PHRM 505. Skills Lab – Integrated Pharmacotherapy I

2

PHRM 509. Foundations for Interprofessional Communications

1

PHRM 511. Biostatistics

3

PHRM 512. Pharmacy Law

3

PHRM 515. Pharmaceutics II

3

PHRM 516. Pharmaceutical Calculations II

1

PHRM 561. Intro to Pharmacy Practice Experiences

0

PHRM 579b. Lifelong Learning

1

Subtotal

19

PHRM 562. Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience I: Community Practice (summer)

4 


Year 2 (P2)

Fall

Course 

Hours

PHRM 520. Integrated Pharmacotherapy II

2

PHRM 521. Integrated Pharmacotherapy III

3

PHRM 522. Integrated Pharmacotherapy IV

3

PHRM 525. Skills Lab – Integrated Pharmacotherapy II-IV

2

PHRM 528. Population Health and Study Design Evolution

3

PHRM 533. Skills Lab – Pharmaceutical Compounding and Dispensing

2

PHRM 579c. Lifelong Learning

0

PHRM 564a. Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience IIA: Hospital Pharm

2

Elective

3

Subtotal

20

 

 

Spring

Course

Hours

PHRM 523. Integrated Pharmacotherapy V

4

PHRM 524. Integrated Pharmacotherapy VI

4

PHRM 526. Skills Lab – Integrated Pharmacotherapy V - VI

2

PHRM 529. Drug Information and Health Informatics

3

PHRM 530. Health Care Ethics

2

PHRM 534. Pharmaceutics III

2

PHRM 579d. Lifelong Learning

1

PHRM 564b. Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience IIB

2

Subtotal

20


Year 3 (P3)

Fall

Course 

Hours

PHRM 541. Integrated Pharmacotherapy VII

3

PHRM 542. Integrated Pharmacotherapy VIII

5

PHRM 544. Skills Lab – Integrated Pharmacotherapy VII - VIII

2

PHRM 548. Pharmacoepidemiology, Pharmacoeconomics and Health Outcomes

3

PHRM 553. Pharmacy, Pharmacogenomics and Precision Medicine

2

PHRM 566a. Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience IIIA: Elective Experience

2

Elective

3

Subtotal

20

 

 

Spring

Course

Hours

PHRM 543. Integrated Pharmacotherapy IX

3

PHRM 545. Skills Lab – Integrated Pharmacotherapy I - IX

3

PHRM 549. Topics in Pharmacy Law

1

PHRM 550. Contemporary Pharmacy Leadership and Management

3

PHRM 551. Public Health and Global Health Problems

2

PHRM 554. Advanced Skills Lab – Pharmaceutical Compounding

1

PHRM 566b. Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience IIIB: Elective Experience

2

Elective

3

Subtotal

18


Year 4 (P4)

Progression to Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs)

Course

Hours

PHRM 572. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience I: Community Pharmacy

 

6

PHRM 573. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience II: Ambulatory Care Pharmacy

 

6

PHRM 574. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience III: Pharmacy Administration/Institutional

 

6

PHRM 575. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience IV: General/Internal Medicine

 

6

PHRM 581– PHRM 589. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience: Elective

 

6

PHRM 581– PHRM 589. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience: Elective

 

6

PHRM 595: Pharmacy Capstone Project

 

6

Subtotal

42

 Total credit hours required for graduation: 160

 

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Capstone Project 

Students will complete a pharmacy capstone project that will expose them to research or clinical problems that will require critical thinking and problem-solving skills. 

Capstone Project Design

Acceptable categories for the capstone project include bench or clinical research, business plans, retrospective chart or protocol reviews, educational research, or other pharmacy-related topics

Year

Activity

Length

P3

Clinical, tenure-track or adjunct faculty member assigned to mentor a group of 5 students. One TA is assigned to the group. Students design an independent, pharmacy-related research endeavor that follows the established guidelines for a research paper. Workflow is designed and IRB submission is prepared.

5 hours

P4

During an APPE rotation, the TA assists the student(s) to collect and analyze data for the project resulting in a rough draft for the mentor by the end of the rotation.

6 weeks (40 hours each week)

P4

A final poster or platform presentation is due at the end of the fourth professional year. These will be presented in a public forum at the annual School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Capstone Poster and Presentation Day in late April.

5 hours

Throughout the curriculum, students will be presented and equipped with tools and methods that enable their life-long learning; the educational philosophy emphasizes that healthcare professionals must be able to replenish their knowledge and skills continually. Skills and methods extend beyond the pharmacotherapy knowledge and clinical skills developed in the integrated pharmacotherapy and accompanying skills lab courses to include human subject research studies that ultimately inform and quickly evolve “best clinical practice” and evidence-based guidelines as well as “bench” or exploratory biomedical research. 

 

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Grades

Grades are on a letter scale: A through C–, D, and F. Grades of S (satisfactory) and U (unsatisfactory) may be used in a limited number of cases, as described in the Academic Policies and Procedures — Graduate section of the University Bulletin, for which no greater precision in grading is required. The grades of S and U are not assigned numerical value and thus are not averaged in with other grades in computing grade-point averages. A grade of S denotes a minimum level of academic performance equivalent to at least a B. 

For the purpose of computing semester or cumulative averages, each letter grade is assigned a quality point value. These quality point values are combined with course credit hours to produce a grade-point average. A cumulative grade-point average of a 2.5 is required for graduation. Courses for which a student has received a D or F do not count toward the number of courses required for a graduate degree or certificate.

The School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences percentage ranges are as follows: 

Letter Grade

Numeric Grade

Percentage Grade

A

4.0

92.5 - 100

A-

3.7

89.5 – 92.4

B+

3.3

86.5 – 89.4

B

3.0

82.5 – 86.4

B-

2.7

79.5 – 82.4

C+

2.3

74.5 – 79.4

C

2.0

69.5 – 74.4

C-

1.7

66.5 – 69.4

D

1.0

59.5 – 66.4

F

0.0

< 59.5

 

 

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Course Schedule Change Policies

The School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences follows all of the Graduate School policies regarding changes in course schedules. The SOPPS strongly discourages changes in any course within a pharmacy student’s schedule without consultation from the associate dean for curriculum and assessment and the assistant dean for student affairs within SOPPS. Dropping a course or changing a schedule in any way could result in a significant extension of the time required to earn the PharmD degree. Due to this, changes in academic schedules should only happen in extreme situations. 

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Residence Requirement

PharmD students will be expected to complete the entirety of their required coursework at Binghamton University. Exceptions for accepting transfer credits from other institutions will be granted only in rare occasions. See the Transfer Credit section below for more information. 

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Transfer Credit

Approval must be received in writing from the associate dean for curriculum and assessment and the dean of the PharmD program the applicant is transferring to before registering at another institution. Students transferring credits to Binghamton University will need to complete the Request for Transfer Credit form, which is available from the Graduate School.  

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Part-Time and Non-Matriculated/Non-Degree Study

Part-time and non-matriculated/non-degree study options are not available. 

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Misconduct Procedures

Students are subject to disciplinary action for violations of any of the SOPPS policies held within the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Student Handbook and any policies held within Binghamton University’s Student Handbook or Student Code of Conduct. Any suspected violations of academic, ethical or professional standards may be reported to the SOPPS Offices of Academic or Student Affairs which, at their discretion, may forward these violations to the Committee on Awards and Progression (CAP) for evaluation, and/or to the Binghamton University Division of Student Affairs, for evaluation and adjudication. (See the Student Code of Conduct for more information on the Binghamton University Division of Student Affairs student conduct process and outcomes.)

Within the SOPPS, disciplinary action will be taken by CAP for students who breach the SOPPS Honor Code. The severity of action will depend on the severity of the infraction, the frequency of infractions, and if it is a repeated infraction. Actions can include but are not limited to verbal or written warnings, professional remediation, professional probation, or dismissal. CAP decisions will be communicated to students and their faculty advisors by either the associate dean for academic affairs and assessment or the dean as appropriate. In cases where professional remediation is warranted, a professional remediation plan will be developed incorporating input from the faculty advisor, course faculty and/or preceptors. Students will have the opportunity to have a hearing, given ample notification of the hearing’s time and location, and will be able to follow an appeals process regarding the outcome of the hearing. (For a more detailed description of the conduct process or appeals process, check the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Student Handbook and the SOPPS Office for Student Affairs.)  

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Grievance Procedures

Students are encouraged to make every effort to solve problems informally, by working with their class representatives and class advisors, faculty members, and both the associate dean for academic affairs and assessment and the assistant dean for student affairs. For more formal complaints/grievances, please refer to the process outlined in the SOPPS Student Handbook. Examples of potential reasons for a complaint/grievance include but are not limited to perceived discrimination or harassment, bias of any type, a perceived level of unfairness, etc. Refer to the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Student Handbook for the full grievance process. At any time, a student may file a grievance to Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education. For a statement of the ACPE complaint policy and procedures on how to file a complaint, refer to the following website: https://acpe-accredit.org/complaints/

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Academic Grievance Procedures

The student should first attempt to resolve any academic disagreement with the course director/lecturer. If the student fails to reach a satisfactory resolution, the student may appeal the grade in accordance with the following policy on academic appeal. 

  • The student must submit the appeal in writing along with a description of the results of the communication with the course director/lecturer, and any pertinent graded materials to the Committee on Awards and Progression (CAP). The information that the student presents to the CAP will be shared with the involved course director/lecturer who will be given an opportunity to respond to the student’s appeal. The appeal must be made within five business days after the official end of semester grades are reported.

Grounds for Academic Appeal

For an appeal of a course grade to be considered, it must be based upon one or more of the following grounds and upon allegation that the ground or grounds cited influenced the grade assignment to the student’s detriment:

  1. Arithmetic or clerical error
  2. Documented ineffectiveness of the course instructor to prepare students for success in the course, on tests or in assignments

(See the Grievance Appeals Procedure within the Graduate School Manual for appeals processes outside of the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.) 

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Student Progression and Dismissal Policies

Students are expected to progress through the PharmD program in four-years while maintaining a minimum 2.50 GPA and upholding the academic honesty and professional codes of conduct as delineated in the SOPPS Student Handbook.

However, student progression may be delayed or deferred. Additionally, under some conditions a student can be dismissed from the PharmD program.

Student progression can be delayed due to poor academic performance, professional or academic misconduct, or student election due to medical or personal issues. The range of potential routes for delayed progression or dismissal and SOPPS policies related to progression/dismissal are described below.

Failure to maintain minimum GPA

Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or better during their didactic coursework (pre-APPEs) and must have at least a 2.50 cumulative GPA to enter APPEs. Should a student not be able to maintain a cumulative 2.50 GPA, he or she will be placed on Academic Probation. A student must have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or better by the end of P3 year or he/she cannot enter APPEs.

When a student is placed on Academic Probation (see below), his or her semester and cumulative GPAs are monitored by the Office of Academic Affairs and Assessment. Should a student be mathematically eliminated from obtaining a 2.50 cumulative GPA by the end of P3 year, then he/she will be given the option of withdrawing and re-entering with another cohort before being dismissed from the program.

Students must meet the following requirements to progress/complete the program:

  1. By end of P1 Year: Students with cumulative GPAs below 2.0 at the end of P1 cannot progress to P2 and may be eligible for a 5-year plan (see requirements for 5-Year Plan).
  1. By end of P3 Year: A student must have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or better by the end of P3 year or he/she cannot enter APPEs.

Dismissal from the PharmD program

The Dean confers all dismissal decisions with input from the Office of Academic Affairs and Assessment (OAAA) and the Committee on Awards and Progression (CAP). Students can be dismissed from the program for the reasons listed below.

  1. Exhausted the limits of the remediation policy (>4 courses including IPPEs throughout P1 - P3).
  2. Failure to maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher by the end of P3 year.
  3. Cumulative GPA < 2.0 at the end of the P1 year.
  4. GPA below 2.0 at the end of any semester or academic year.
  5. Failure of two or more APPE experiences.
  6. Severe or continued academic or professional misconduct.

Students can appeal the dismissal decision. The process for appeal is outlined in the SOPPS Student Handbook.

5-Year Plan

Students can be placed on a 5-year plan—defined as withdrawing at the end of a semester/academic year and returning with the next cohort to reattempt the curriculum—for the following reasons:

  1. Failing remediation of a course.
  2. Need for remediating more than 2 courses in a given semester.
  3. Cumulative GPA < 2.0 at the end of P1 year.
    1. Requires review and permission of CAP

Stipulations and conditions regarding expectations of student academic performance will be administered individually.

Remediation

If at the end of any pre-APPE semester (P1-P3), a student has failed (defined as a final grade below C-) one or more courses, he or she may be eligible to remediate the course content. However, if a student has failed more than 2 courses in any semester or has already remediated 4 courses throughout P1-P3, he or she will not be eligible for remediation and will instead be offered the opportunity to re-enter the program with another cohort (5-year plan) as long as the student has not exceeded the course remediation limit. A student can be placed on a 5-year plan one time.

If a student is not able to successfully remediate a course, he or she will also be offered a 5-year plan opportunity.

Students can remediate 1 APPE experience. After that, any additional failure in APPEs will result in potential dismissal from the program.

Monitoring Student Academic Progress

At the mid-point of each semester, CAP in conjunction with the Office of Academic Affairs and Assessment, examines student grades in all courses. Students who are struggling (defined as a mid-point course grade of D or F) will receive a letter detailing a success plan for each course in which the student is struggling. Students’ individual cases will be reviewed by CAP and an individualized “success plan” will be developed by CAP/OAAA and appropriate faculty. The “success plan” will be designed to focus on ensuring students are being given appropriate supplemental assistance to achieve the learning outcomes and competencies expected of them.

Additionally, students who were already on Academic Probation or who are at-risk in more than 1 course will meet individually with CAP to discuss progress.

Student Academic Probation

The criteria for academic probation are:

  1. Failure to maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.50 for any given academic year during P1 - P3.
  2. A semester GPA of <2.0 for any given semester.

Students will be notified of academic probation via letter from the Office of Academic Affairs and Assessment. Students on academic probation may have restrictions on extra-curricular activities as deemed appropriate.

While on academic probation, students’ academic progress will be monitored closely and students may need to meet with CAP at the mid-point of the semester if academic performance has not improved.

Students will be removed from academic probation when they attain good standing, defined by all of the following:

  1. Maintaining a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or greater.
  2. Current semester GPA >2.0
  3. Adherence to Academic Integrity Guidelines

Students will be notified of their removal from academic probation by letter from the Office of Academic Affairs and Assessment.

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Glossary and Definition of Terms

Academic probation - Student fails to maintain the minimum GPA of 2.50 either in a given semester or cumulatively and is placed on a “success plan” with monitoring.

Academic dismissal - Removal of a student from the PharmD program due to poor academic performance. Dismissal decisions are made by the dean.

Deferred academic progression - Delay of a student’s academic progress/program continuation for up to a full academic year due to circumstances approved by the ADSA, ADAAA such as need for family or medical need. This can be initiated by the student with consultation with the CAP and the ADSA. 

Delayed academic progression - Mandatory delay of a student’s academic progress/program continuation for up to a full academic year due to poor academic performance.

Professional probation - Student is placed on a “success plan” with monitoring due to a violation(s) of the honor code, academic honesty code or policies unrelated to academic achievement. Probation may have restrictions on extra-curricular activities.

Professional dismissal - Removal of a student from the PharmD program due to a violation(s) of the honor code, academic honesty code or policies unrelated to academic achievement. Dismissal decisions are made by the dean.

Remediation - Supplemental education for students failing to demonstrate minimal competence during the regular course schedule. This allows students additional opportunities to demonstrate core competencies and learning outcomes for course content and skills.  Remediation opportunities are usually made available to students immediately after the semester in which the course is routinely offered and are completed prior to the subsequent semester.

Undelayed progression - Student continuation and successful completion of the curriculum/PharmD program in the prescribed four-year course timeline.