Decker College of Nursing and Health Sciences

School of Applied Health Sciences

Public Health - Graduate

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About the Master of Public Health (MPH) Program

The Master of Public Health (MPH) program at Binghamton University is a 48-credit multi-disciplinary professional degree program that offers both full-time and part-time study with selective scholarship in the areas of population health or global health. The MPH program is designed for individuals who are interested in pursuing a career in public health as well as those currently in the public health workforce who wish to further their education. Through a sequenced curriculum, students learn how to evaluate scientific evidence and translate it into meaningful health improvements for diverse populations and communities. Upon completion of their program of study, students earn a generic Master of Public Health (MPH) degree.

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Mission

The Master of Public Health program at Binghamton University prepares graduates to analyze complex public health issues and work collaboratively to create healthier communities in New York and throughout the world. 

With a focus on healthy communities and populations both local and global, the program educates students who can integrate the knowledge and values of public health into careers in a variety of fields such as epidemiology. Through a transdisciplinary approach integrating classroom learning, academic research, interprofessional collaborations, and community engagement, it prepares graduates for leadership positions developing evidence-based solutions for critical health problems. 

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Vision

The Master of Public Health program at Binghamton University will provide a collaborative and transdisciplinary environment in which students develop competency as public health professionals who actively engage with individuals from diverse cultures in local and global contexts to promote and protect the health and well-being of communities and to reduce health disparities for marginalized, disadvantaged, underserved and vulnerable populations.

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Values

Think Global, Act Local

  • Respect for Others is manifested through our caring interactions and civil discourse.
  • Diversity is embraced and valued believing that each member of a community uniquely contributes to its strengths.
  • Advocacy gives voice to health issues and intervenes on behalf of others especially those who are unable to do so for themselves.
  • Social Justice assures the fair and equitable distribution of opportunities and services and is viewed as the ultimate goal of all public health efforts.

Interprofessional Collaboration and Community Engagement

  • Collaboration is characterized by collegial relationships in which communication, consensus building and teamwork are valued.
  • Engagement involves bi-directional community learning and mobilizes the expertise of community partners to solve public health problems.
  • Community Service reflects our commitment to others and involves actions performed for public benefit or on behalf of organizations to meet community health needs.
  • Leadership is viewed as a responsibility of all public health professionals and involves skillful guidance of collective efforts to achieve public health goals.

Evidence-Based Solutions to Complex Health Problems

  • Systems Thinking is a vital skill for public health professionals to analyze complex health issues and to develop multi-faceted interventions at various socio-ecological levels across diverse regions.
  • Innovation refers to a culture that challenges conventional thinking, leverages technology, encourages transformational change, and cultivates creative solutions to public health problems.
  • Discovery involves scientific inquiry and scholarship and provides the basis for critique, translation and dissemination of evidence in public health practice.
  • High Impact refers to the data-driven capacity to analyze public health system operational performance and measurably improve the health of populations locally and globally.
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Code of Ethics

The publication Principles of the Ethical Practice of Public Health elucidates key principles, values and beliefs inherent to the ethical practice of public health. This code of ethics for public health recognizes the universal human right to the resources necessary for health and the interdependency of humans within communal environments. The public health mandate to preserve, promote and protect the health of the public is grounded in the moral imperatives of respect, empowerment, social justice and health equity. The code emphasizes the unique responsibility that public health practitioners have to communities for the promotion of health and prevention of disease, and the vital trust that communities place in public health institutions designed to serve them. This code of ethics functions as a guide for upholding these ideals as well as the standard to which public health students, practitioners, programs and institutions are held accountable. Students enrolled in the Master of Public Health program are therefore expected to uphold the public’s trust by exemplifying personal integrity and ethical behavior in social, academic and professional settings.

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Commitment to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

The MPH program is grounded in the principles of diversity, equity and inclusion. The MPH program is committed to creating inclusive learning environments where students from diverse backgrounds have equal opportunities to be actively engaged in rigorous scholarship and collaborative interactions that develop their potential and support their academic success. The MPH program recognizes that each individual possesses unique talents and abilities and that responsible stewardship of the academic endeavor requires that these differences be appreciated and respected. Individuals, as well as communities, are constantly engaged in complex interactions that influence cultural identity, social attitudes and behavioral norms as well as health. In the pursuit of scholarly inquiry in the field of public health, community members should be actively involved in all phases of the process: defining relevant issues and engaging expertise, setting goals and selecting priorities for action, assessing and securing resources, designing and implementing change, determining subsequent effects and impacts, and making findings accessible and understandable. Creating healthy communities and assuring health equity requires public health students to acquire essential public health competencies and to embrace reflective practice that is mindful of cultural diversity, inclusive of vulnerable and marginalized groups, and sensitive to community values.

Thus, the MPH program at Binghamton University is dedicated to:

  • Fostering a culture of academic excellence and ethical scholarly inquiry.
  • Stimulating effective interdisciplinary and inter-professional communication and collaboration.
  • Promoting student and faculty achievement and success in academic endeavors.
  • Maximizing student and faculty professional potential and career mobility.
  • Valuing exploration, discovery, creativity and innovation through practice-based learning to address existing and emerging public health issues.
  • Infusing social responsibility for the health and well-being of communities served.
  • Engaging with partner organizations and stakeholder groups in a manner responsive to community needs.
  • Immersing students in substantive population health and global public health experiences that broaden their perspective on the social context of health.
  • Employing information systems technology and best evidence to inform decision-making about public health policy, programs and practice.
  • Ensuring that the curriculum meets accreditation standards for professional development of core public health competencies and acquisition of essential public health values.
  • Nurturing safe inclusive learning environments in which cultural diversity and individual expression are appreciated and respected.
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End of Program Objectives

  1. Scientific Foundations for Public Health Practice: Employ a broad mastery of the five core areas of public health including application of empirical methods and practical approaches to promote and protect the health of individuals, communities and populations.
  2. Health Promotion and Disease Prevention: Use relevant strategies and appropriate methods to identify current and emerging public health challenges, analyze determinants of health and disease, and implement evidence-based public health programs and policies that promote health and prevent disease across the lifespan.
  3. Scholarship and Research for Evidence-Based Public Health Practice: Conduct scholarly activities and scientifically rigorous research designed to solve public health problems, address health inequities, eliminate health disparities, and improve the health and well-being of individuals, communities and populations.
  4. Global Perspectives - Community Engagement and Cultural Context: Engage respectfully and effectively with diverse communities to promote the health of all members, appreciating the multi-layered cultural contexts of public health issues that shape health inequities, especially for individuals from marginalized, disadvantaged, underserved and vulnerable populations.
  5. Information and Health Technologies for Public Health: Leverage information and health technologies to achieve data-driven improvements in public health systems, infrastructure, and services including systems designed for surveillance of public health threats and monitoring of health outcomes.
  6. Inter-professional Collaboration for Improving Health Outcomes: Collaborate with professionals from across disciplines working interdependently as a constructive public health team member fostering organizational and community partnerships to achieve improvements in health outcomes for individuals, communities and populations.
  7. Public Health System Leadership: Demonstrate organizational and leadership skills aimed at transforming public health infrastructure and creating healthier environments through dynamic systems thinking, effective written and verbal communication, efficient project management and capacity building and responsible stewardship of resources.
  8. Public Health Policy and Advocacy for Health Equity: Advocate for social justice and health equity through use of participatory strategies, inclusive partnerships, high impact media communications and translation of scientifically rigorous research into public health policies, programs, and practices that yield measurable improvements in population health and elimination of health disparities.
  9. Ethical Public Health Practice: Exhibit personal and professional integrity in all areas of public health education, research and service that is reflective of the values, ideals and ethical standards that define public health practice.
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Admission Requirements

Students applying to the MPH program submit their application materials through the Graduate School. All students wishing to pursue an MPH must satisfy the general conditions and procedures for admission to Binghamton University's Graduate School. Application materials include:

  • Application form with application fee.
  • Transcripts.
  • Two letters of recommendation.
  • Personal statement.
  • Résumé.
  • Students are expected to have a GPA of 3.0 or above and a successful background in quantitative coursework.
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are not routinely required, but may be requested based on evaluation of official transcripts.

NOTE: An applicant who does not meet the academic requirements for admission may be admitted conditionally (refer to Graduate School Policies & Procedures). A conditional admission indicates that, although the candidate did not meet admission requirements, other elements of the application (such as the personal statement, reference letters, etc.) suggest that they possess the potential to be successful. Students admitted conditionally must have satisfactory academic performance in the first semester of the MPH Program to receive a change in status to “regular.”

International applicants

Binghamton University does not currently issue forms I-20 or DS-2019 (necessary to apply for F-1 or J-1 nonimmigrant status) for the Master of Public Health (MPH) program. The program is working to become registered in the SEVIS system governed by the United States Department of Homeland Security and anticipates full registration prior to fall 2018. Noncitizens currently in the U.S. in visa classifications that allow for full-time study "incidental to status" are encouraged to apply.

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Academic Advising

Students enrolled in the Master of Public Health (MPH) program at Binghamton University will be assigned an academic advisor who is a faculty member in the MPH program. The academic advisor assists students to develop a program plan that supports their academic success. Students will have an opportunity to assess their academic progress, skill development and achievement of public health competencies at the beginning of the program and each semester thereafter. The academic advisor can also provide guidance on career opportunities and assist students with field placements that align with their professional interests. Note that students are required to maintain a 3.0 grade point average in order to be placed in internships. For students who encounter difficulties, the academic advisor serves as an important resource for a range of support services. Students are responsible for scheduling regular meetings with their academic advisor to assess progress and should promptly contact their academic advisor to address any questions or concerns that may arise during intervening periods.

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MPH Curriculum

The Master of Public Health (MPH) program at Binghamton University offers a generic master’s program with selective areas of focused scholarship in population or global public health. The curriculum includes two foundation courses (required), one course in public health biology, which may be waived for students with previous college-level coursework in the biological sciences, and one course focused on role development and socialization in public health. As well, the curriculum includes five core courses (required) in: Social and Behavioral Sciences in Public Health, Biostatistics, Environmental Health, Epidemiology, and Health Policy, Finance and Management. The curriculum also includes a required course in applied epidemiology that uses a case-based approach to integrate all core disciplines. In addition, a sequence of three experiential public health courses (required) engages students in inter-professional learning activities that foster socialization into the public health role, development of problem-solving skills, and proficiency in health policy analysis and advocacy. Each of the selective areas (population or global public health) consists of a three-course sequence: (a) research concepts and measurements, (b) determinants and disparities, and (c) policies, strategies and implementation. In addition, a topics course for each selective area explores current and emerging public health issues. Students are also required to complete an internship practicum and capstone project to meet degree requirements (9 credits). Electives are available to students including program planning and evaluation.

Sample curriculum and program plan for full-time students (48 credit hours):

 YEAR 1

FALL

Credits

SPRING

Credits

PH 510. Foundations of Public Health

2

PH 517. Public Health Biology *

2

PH 501. Experiential Public Health I

1

PH 502. Experiential Public Health II

1

PH 512. Social and Behavioral Sciences in Public Health

3

PH 522. Health Policy, Finance & Management

3

PH 520. Epidemiology I: Basic Principles & Methods

3

PH 515. Introduction to Biostatistics

3

PH 518. Environmental Health

3

PH 530. Global Health I

               or

PH 540. Population Health I

3

TOTAL CREDITS                                

12

TOTAL CREDITS                

12

 YEAR 2

FALL

Credits

SPRING

Credits

PH 524. Program Planning & Evaluation

2

PH 538. Global Health III

               or

PH 548. Population Health III

3

PH 503. Experiential Public Health III

1

PH 525. Epidemiology II: Applied Epidemiology

3

PH 595. Global Health Practicum & Capstone

               or

PH 598. Population Health Practicum & Capstone

9

PH 535. Global Health II

               or

PH 545. Population Health II

3

PH 550. Topics in Global Health

               or

PH 552. Topics in Population Health

3

 

 

TOTAL CREDITS

12

TOTAL CREDITS

12

* Required foundation course for students without previous coursework in the biological sciences.

  

Sample curriculum and program plan for part-time students (48 credit hours):

 YEAR 1

FALL

Credits

SPRING

Credits

PH 510. Foundations of Public Health

2

PH 517. Public Health Biology *

2

PH 501. Experiential Public Health I

1

PH 502. Experiential Public Health II

1

PH 512. Social and Behavioral Sciences in Public Health

3

PH 522. Health Policy, Finance & Management

3

TOTAL CREDITS                                

6

TOTAL CREDITS                

6

 YEAR 2

FALL

Credits

SPRING

Credits

PH 520. Epidemiology I: Basic Principles & Methods

3

PH 515. Introduction to Biostatistics

3

PH 518. Environmental Health

3

PH 530. Global Health I

               or

PH 540. Population Health I

3

TOTAL CREDITS                                

6

TOTAL CREDITS                

6

 YEAR 3

FALL

Credits

SPRING

Credits

PH 535. Global Health II

               or

PH 545. Population Health II

3

PH 538. Global Health III

               or

PH 548. Population Health III

3

PH 525. Epidemiology II: Case Applications

3

PH 595. Global Health Practicum & Capstone

               or

PH 598. Population Health Practicum & Capstone

3

TOTAL CREDITS

6

TOTAL CREDITS

6

 YEAR 4

FALL

Credits

SPRING

Credits

PH 524. Program Planning & Evaluation

2

PH 550. Topics in Global Health

               or

PH 552. Topics in Population Health

3

PH 503. Experiential Public Health III

1

PH 595. Global Health Practicum & Capstone

               or

PH 598. Population Health Practicum & Capstone

3

PH 595. Global Health Practicum & Capstone

               or

PH 598. Population Health Practicum & Capstone

3

TOTAL CREDITS

6

TOTAL CREDITS

6

* Required foundation course for students without previous coursework in the biological sciences.

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Degree Requirements

The Master of Public Health degree requires completion of 48 credits of graduate-level coursework that includes:

  • Two foundation courses [total 4 cr.]:
    • PH 510. Foundations of Public Health (2 cr.)
    • PH 517. Public Health Biology (2 cr.) **
      [** Required foundation course for students without previous coursework in the biological sciences]
  • Three courses in Experiential Public Health [total 3 cr.]:
    • PH 501. Experiential Public Health I (1 cr.)
    • PH 502. Experiential Public Health II (1 cr.)
    • PH 503. Experiential Public Health III (1 cr.)
  • Five discipline-specific core courses [total 18 cr.]:
    • PH 512. Social and Behavioral Sciences in Public Health (3 cr.)
    • PH 515. Introduction to Biostatistics (3 cr.)
    • PH 518. Environmental Health (3 cr.)
    • PH 520. Epidemiology I: Basic Principles & Methods (3 cr.)
    • PH 522. Health Policy, Finance & Management (3 cr.)
  • One integrative course in applied epidemiology [3 cr.]
    • PH 525. Epidemiology II: Case Applications (3 cr.)
  • Selective course sequence in either Global Health or Population Health [total 12 cr.]
    • PH 530 or PH 540 - Course I: Research Concepts and Measurements (3 cr.)
    • PH 535 or PH 545 - Course II: Determinants and Disparities (3 cr.)
    • PH 538 or PH 548 - Course III: Policies, Strategies, and Implementation (3 cr.)
    • PH 550 or PH 552 - Topics Course (3 cr.)
  • Public health elective [2 to 4 cr.]
    • PH 524. Program Planning and Evaluation (2 cr.)
    • Other public health elective ** (2 cr.)
      [** if PH 517 Public Health Biology waived based on prior course work]
  • Internship Practicum and Capstone Project in either Global Health or Population Health [total 9 cr.]
    • PH 595 or PH 598 - Internship Practicum and Capstone Project 
      [may be completed in a single semester as an intensive Internship Practicum and Capstone Project (9 cr.) or over two or more semesters as an extended Internship Practicum and Capstone Project (3 cr. or 6 cr.)]

Students are responsible for their academic progression in the curriculum and for compliance with MPH program, Graduate School, and Binghamton University policies and procedures.

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Experiential Public Health Requirement

A required sequence of three Experiential Public Health courses (1 credit each) engages students in inter-professional learning activities that foster socialization into the public health role, development of problem-solving skills, and proficiency in health policy analysis and advocacy. For each of the Experiential Public Health courses, one credit hour represents 4 hours per week or 60 hours per semester of public health socialization and role development activities. The Experiential Public Health courses are graded as satisfactory or unsatisfactory. A grade of satisfactory is required to receive credit for the course and meet degree requirements.

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Internship Practicum and Capstone Project Requirement

Gaining practical field experience is an integral part of the Master of Public Health program. Students are required to complete nine (9) Internship Practicum and Capstone Project credits that may be undertaken at various public health agencies or community organizations. The Internship Practicum and Capstone Project requirement provides opportunities for applied learning with integration of core conceptual knowledge and development of interdisciplinary, interprofessional, and cross-cutting competencies. This field experience is designed to be responsive to the interests of students, align with faculty strengths, and meet the needs of employers by offering a supervised, rigorous, in-depth, skills-based education in a real-world setting.

To be eligible and register for Internship Practicum and Capstone Project courses, students are required to:

  1. Hold a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or higher.
  2. Have completed coursework in the five core areas.
  3. Have completed or be concurrently enrolled in PH 525 Epidemiology II: Case Applications.

The nine (9) MPH Internship Practicum and Capstone Project credits equate to 540 hours of practical field experience which can be filled by a single intensive Internship Practicum and Capstone Project, or combinations of 3 credit (180 hours) or 6 credit (360 hours) courses. Note that one credit hour represents 4 hours per week or 60 hours per semester of supervised public health practicum (field work). Blocks of 3 practicum credit hours equate to 180 total hours of fieldwork per semester.

All internships must be approved by the field placement coordinator or MPH program director. The academic advisor has an important role in this process by monitoring progress toward fulfilling degree requirements, discussing how to select an internship practicum that can advance the student’s career goals, and guiding development of the capstone project. In most cases, the academic advisor will be the supervising faculty for the Internship Practicum and Capstone Project and will evaluate performance at the placement site as well as oversee the Capstone Project. Fieldwork is evaluated by the supervising faculty as well as the site supervisor, who judge and certify different aspects of the student’s work. Internship Practicum and Capstone Project courses are graded as satisfactory or unsatisfactory. A grade of satisfactory is required to receive credit for the course and meet degree requirements.

Options for fulfilling the Internship Practicum and Capstone Project requirement may include placement in local health departments, public or private sector healthcare agencies, as well as governmental or non-governmental community-based organizations. Students may identify other internship practicum opportunities and should work closely with the field placement coordinator and academic advisor to ensure that all degree requirements can be met by the fieldwork experience. Students may also seek internship practicum opportunities outside of the geographic region through formal programs that have experience coordinating internships to meet students’ academic requirements. Note that ALL internship practicums for which academic credit is sought must be approved by the field placement coordinator or MPH program director prior to starting the fieldwork experience.

Some practice sites may have specific requirements that students must meet prior to placement in the agency, institution, or organization. Students are responsible for meeting these requirements and any ensuing costs (e.g., cardiopulmonary resuscitation certification, health evaluation and immunizations, or criminal background checks). Students are responsible for any travel, accommodations, or meal expenses associated with the MPH Internship Practicum and Capstone Project.

Students are accountable for knowing the policies and procedures related to fieldwork experiences, for meeting the Internship Practicum and Capstone Project requirements, and for ensuring that all required approvals and mandatory documentation for the field experience are submitted in a timely manner in order to meet Master of Public Health degree requirements. Policies and procedures that guide the Internship Practicum and Capstone Project can be found in the Internship Practicum and Capstone Project: A Field Work Guide.

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Internship Practicum Waivers

Up to 3 credits of internship practicum may be waived for students with significant public health experience prior to entry into the MPH program. Information about the waiver request process can be found in the Internship Practicum and Capstone Project: A Field Work Guide. Students with prior public health experience who plan to request a waiver should plan to meet with their academic advisor at the beginning of their program of study for development of an individualized program plan.

Note that course waivers do not reduce the number of credits required for the MPH degree. If waivers are approved, students must work with their academic advisor to identify additional coursework that will be needed to achieve the minimum 48 credits for awarding of the MPH degree. Students who receive a 3-credit waiver of internship practicum are still required to complete 6 credits of Internship Practicum and Capstone Project coursework to meet degree requirements. 

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Capstone Project

The Capstone Project represents a culminating and integrative learning experience in the MPH program. To meet this requirement, students develop a formal Capstone proposal, maintain a project log with a minimum of 180 hours dedicated to the Capstone Project, compose a final written report of the Capstone Project, prepare a slide set presentation that details the Capstone Project for oral defense in a professional/public venue, and submit a Capstone portfolio that includes all of the required Capstone documentation. The Capstone Project should demonstrate substantive application of the knowledge and skills acquired through didactic and experiential courses completed during their program of study.

The Capstone is accomplished as part of the Internship Practicum and Capstone Project coursework with project hours accounting for at least one-third of the total academic credit (3 out of the 9 credits). Students should begin planning for their Capstone Project as early as possible, but no later than the start of their Internship Practicum and Capstone Project coursework. The Capstone Project may require Institutional Review Board approval and/or organizational clearance. Students will need to plan accordingly to stay on projected timelines and meet deadlines for completion of coursework and fulfillment of degree requirements. Students who fail to complete the Capstone Project within the expected time frame will be required to register for continuing credit (one credit per term) until all Capstone requirements are complete.

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Full-Time or Part-Time Study

The Master of Public Health program offers full-time or part-time study options. Students are encouraged to meet with their academic advisor to develop an individualized program plan. Students who wish to change their status from full-time to part-time or vice versa should discuss the change with their academic advisor and develop a new program plan. Students must make a formal request for any change in status to the MPH program director. Per the Graduate School policy, a master’s degree curriculum must be completed within five years from the date of matriculation to remain eligible for awarding of the degree.

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Transfer of Credit

A maximum of 12 graduate credits completed with a B or better that were taken within the previous five years at an accredited college or university may be considered for transfer credit. Courses for transfer are considered and approved on a course by course basis. Students requesting transfer credits must provide syllabi for each course they wish to transfer and an official transcript showing successful completion of coursework (with a minimum grade of B). All decisions regarding transfer credits are at the discretion of the MPH program director and the approval of the Graduate School.

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Course Repeat Policy

MPH students must earn a grade of B or better in required foundation courses, core courses, applied epidemiology, and all courses in the selective course sequence. Students are permitted to repeat for credit a graduate course in which they earned a grade of B- or lower. This option is contingent on approval by the graduate program director and then approval by the Graduate School. A course may be repeated only once. Students should refer to the course repeat policy in the Binghamton University Graduate School Manual.

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Withdrawals

Students who are considering withdrawal from a course or from the program are encouraged to meet with their academic advisor to discuss the challenges or issues that they are facing and to explore options that will support attainment of their academic goals. Students should familiarize themselves with policies related to graduate student withdrawals in the Binghamton University Bulletin and the Graduate School Manual. Students are required to speak with the MPH program director if there is any change in their enrollment/registration status and must follow Binghamton University policies and procedures for all withdrawals.

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Grievance Policy

Graduate students who believe they have been subjected to unfair treatment in the administration of academic policies or procedures must first seek informal resolution of their concerns within the MPH program before invoking the formal processes of the Graduate School. The first step of the informal process involves attempting to find resolution by discussing the issue with the person most directly involved. If no mutually agreeable resolution is reached by this process, then the next step is to seek resolution from the MPH program director. If there are concerns about reprisals or other unpleasant consequences, then a meeting with the MPH program director may be requested directly. The program director will attempt to mediate the dispute through discussions with the persons involved, either together or separately. If a mutually agreeable resolution is not reached through this informal mediation process, the individuals involved may request further review of the issue by following the formal procedure of the Graduate School. Students should refer to the Graduate School Manual for policies and procedures related to what constitutes a grievance, jurisdiction of the Grievance Appeal Committee, and the steps involved in a Formal Grievance Appeal Procedure.

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Academic Honesty

Graduate students enrolled in the Master of Public Health (MPH) program are expected to adhere to the highest standards of academic honesty and integrity. Academic honesty and integrity are essential behaviors for graduate students to meet the ethical competencies expected of public health professionals. The code of ethics for public health guides public health institutions and practitioners in ethical behavior and serves as a standard to which they are held accountable. Graduate students in the MPH program are expected to be aware of Binghamton University policies and procedures related to academic honesty and integrity. Misappropriation of academic or intellectual credit to oneself or to the discredit of others constitutes a violation of academic honesty. Although not an exhaustive list, Binghamton University has identified the following forms of academic dishonesty: plagiarism, cheating on examinations, multiple submissions, unauthorized collaboration, fabrication and misrepresentation, forgery, sabotage, and bribery. The appropriate procedures for addressing academic dishonesty differ depending on the nature of the violation. Category I violations are considered serious but may be handled by the instructor and student(s) involved. Category II violations are more grievous in nature and appropriately dealt with by an Academic Honesty Committee. Category II violations may result in letters of reprimand, probation, suspension or expulsion from the University, transcript notation, and/or revocation of degree or honors. Students should refer to the Binghamton University Bulletin and the Graduate School Manual for policies and procedures related to categories of violations and enforcement procedures.