Bachelor of Arts: Anthropological Perspectives

Bachelor of Arts - Anthropological Perspectives

The BA in anthropology allows flexibility in the sequencing and selection of courses toward the major. Students may value this flexibility if, for example, you wish to concentrate in a particular sub-discipline (or two) during the course of your undergraduate studies, or if you are a double major and need the flexibility of tailoring your anthropology major to complement your other major focus. Students who wish to concentrate in a particular anthropology sub-discipline must include the foundations' course for that sub-discipline as one of their lower-level courses (see worksheet). If you choose to concentrate in one sub-field, remember that no more than seven courses from a single sub-field may be used to fulfill the requirements for the BA.

Not all courses required for the major are offered every year, and new courses added to the department's offerings may well count toward the degree, so you should treat the list of courses as a guide, subject to change. Students are encouraged to see the Director of Undergraduate Studies if they have any questions about major requirements or course selection for the upcoming semester.

A worksheet is provided below in PDF form to help you chart your progress toward the degree. Please note that these worksheets are not a substitute for advising, or for the Degree Works reports issued by the University. Rather, they are to assist you in your course planning.

Note: Only courses passed with a grade of C- or better will be counted toward fulfilling major requirements and, only one course taken under the pass/fail option will be accepted in fulfillment of major requirements.

Worksheet for Major BA in Anthropological Perspectives


  • General Anthropology Minor

    The General Anthropology minor gives the student a broad background in the field of anthropology, and encourages a selection of courses from all of the sub-fields of anthropology, without specialization in any single sub-field:

    • Three courses (12 credits) taken at the 100-200 level; at least one must be at the 200 level;

    • Three courses (12 credits) taken at the 300-400 level.

    • No more than two courses (8 credits) of the total six courses required for the minor may be from any single sub-field (linguistic anthropology, archaeology, biological anthropology, sociocultural anthropology). At least one course (4 credits) should be an "area course" that focuses on the peoples and cultures of a specific world area or region. One of the 300-400 level courses (4 credits) may be in any cognate discipline, chosen in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

    Worksheet for Minor in General Anthropology

  • Biological Anthropology Minor

    The Biological Anthropology minor provides students with a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts of human biology, evolution and the relationships between humans as biological and cultural animals. The program is relevant to students with interests in biology, geology, environmental studies, psychology, nursing, dentistry, medicine and general bio-behavioral science:

    • The foundations' course in biological anthropology, ANTH 168 (4 credits);

    • Three courses (12 credits) taken at the 300 level, chosen from among ANTH 332-339, 420-429;

    • One lower-level course (4 credits) from among ANTH 240-249;

    • One elective course (4 credits) taken in any area of anthropology or in a cognate field, chosen in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

    Worksheet for Minor in Biological Anthropology

  • Sociocultural Anthropology Minor

    The Sociocultural Anthropology minor introduces students to a range of theories, problematics and questions in the study of social and cultural differences around the world. Such training is relevant to students in a wide variety of fields, including area studies (Asian and Asian-American studies, Africana studies, Latin American and Caribbean studies, Judaic studies), economics, geography, history, art history, political science, psychology, sociology and women's studies. This minor is also useful to students interested in cultural diversity and social behavior, and to those interested in gaining a global perspective on social problems and comparative cultural phenomena:

    • The foundations' course in sociocultural anthropology, ANTH 166 (4 credits);

    • At least one sociocultural "area" course (4 credits), probably taken at the 200 level (but does not have to be) that focuses on the peoples and cultures of a specific world area or region, such as ANTH 252, 254, 256, 258, 280 (with a sociocultural and geographic area focus), 370 and 377;

    • Three other sociocultural courses (12 credits) taken at the 300-400 level, such as ANTH 300, 349-354, 360-369, 380 (with a sociocultural focus), 430-439, 450-465, 477 and 480 (with a sociocultural focus);

    • Remaining credits (4) as electives, which may be taken in any area of anthropology or in a cognate field, to be chosen in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

    Worksheet for Minor in Sociocultural Anthropology

  • Archaeology Minor

    The Archaeology minor provides students with a basic understanding of how archaeologists study and reconstruct the past. Such training is relevant to students in a wide variety of fields, including history, art history, classical studies, medieval studies, Judaic studies, African American studies, and Middle Eastern and North African studies:

    • One foundations' course in archaeology (4 credits): ANTH 167 or 169; two archaeological area courses (8 credits), chosen from among ANTH 260-263, 374-377 and 379;

    • Two courses in archaeological methods (8 credits), chosen from among ANTH 320, 321, 371-373, 475 and 476;

    • One elective course (4 credits) in anthropology or any cognate field, chosen in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Any of the courses listed above that are not used for the first three requirements may be used to fulfill this requirement.

    Worksheet for Minor in Archaeology

  • Linguistic Anthropology Minor

    The Linguistic Anthropology minor introduces students to a broad range of theories and questions in the study of language and culture and how they influence each other. Such training is relevant to students in a variety of fields including area studies (Asian and Asian-American studies, Africana studies, Latin American and Caribbean Area studies, Judaic studies), linguistics, economics, geography, history, art history, political science, psychology, sociology, women's studies and romance languages:

    • two foundations' courses in linguistic anthropology (8 credits): "Language, Culture and Communication in the U.S." (ANTH 114) and "Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology" (ANTH 170).

    • one 200 level course in Linguistic Anthropology (4 credits) to choose among: ANTH 210-219 or 280 topics courses (with a linguistic anthropology focus).

    • two 300/400 level courses in Linguistic Anthropology (8 credits) to choose among: ANTH 310-329, 410, 440-449, or 380/480 topics courses (with a linguistic anthropology focus).

    • one elective course (4 credits) taken at any level and in any sub-field of anthropology or the other social sciences, to be chosen in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

    Worksheet for Minor in Linguistic Anthropology

  • Global Studies Minor (GSM)

    The Global Studies Minor (GSM) is multi-disciplinary program where you can investigate your cross-cultural experiences and better understand international, regional and global issues. The GSM is open to all undergraduate students who want to increase their intercultural competencies and add a global dimension to their program of study.

    Learn more about a minor in Global Studies

Students who wish to major in anthropology must complete the Declaration of Major/Minor Form below, which must be signed by the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Declaration of Major/Minor Form