not but nothing other: African-American Portrayals, 1930s to Today

Day Thursday, November 14
Time 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Where Binghamton University Art Museum, Main gallery, FA 213

Titled after a poem by Fred Moten, “not but nothing other: African-American Portrayals, 1930 to Today” presents depictions of and by Black Americans, providing a wide-ranging survey of how artists over the last 80 years have responded to the challenge of picturing African-American selfhood. Key eras of creative production — the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights and Black Power eras, as well as our present moment — are represented by artworks drawn from four prominent U.S. public collections: the Art Bridges Foundation; the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art; the Albright-Knox Art Gallery; and the Fisk University Galleries. From portraits to re-imaginings of historical figures such as Harriet Tubman to realistic renderings to conceptual experiments, these works evidence the ongoing struggle to affirm Black identity within an America marked since its founding by the legacy of slavery, segregation and racial discrimination. Organized by Tom McDonough, associate professor of art history, Binghamton University. Generous support for this project is provided by Art Bridges.


Add to Calendar 14/11/19 12:00 PM 14/11/19 4:00 PM 15 not but nothing other: African-American Portrayals, 1930s to Today Titled after a poem by Fred Moten, “not but nothing other: African-American Portrayals, 1930 to Today” presents depictions of and by Black Americans, providing a wide-ranging survey of how artists over the last 80 years have responded to the challenge of picturing African-American selfhood. Key eras of creative production — the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights and Black Power eras, as well as our present moment — are represented by artworks drawn from four prominent U.S. public collections: the Art Bridges Foundation; the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art; the Albright-Knox Art Gallery; and the Fisk University Galleries. From portraits to re-imaginings of historical figures such as Harriet Tubman to realistic renderings to conceptual experiments, these works evidence the ongoing struggle to affirm Black identity within an America marked since its founding by the legacy of slavery, segregation and racial discrimination. Organized by Tom McDonough, associate professor of art hi Binghamton University Art Museum, Main gallery, FA 213 DD/MM/YY