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Job Search

Searching for a job entails much more than simply clicking an "apply" button. By researching each employer and making thoughtful connections between the employer's needs and what you, as a candidate, have to offer, you will make yourself a much more attractive candidate.

The Fleishman Center can help you develop a successful job or internship search strategy. Our Career Consultants are available to provide feedback on CVs, resumes and cover letters; conduct mock interviews; provide advice on creating a job search plan; and answer any career-related questions.

Master’s-Level Job Search

If you conducted a job search at the conclusion of your undergraduate degree, you will see many similarities in the process at the master’s level. Employers still want to see many of the same things they did from bachelor's-level candidates: strong academics, relevant skills and experiences, and targeted documents that convey your fit with the position and strong interest in their organization. The differences may lie in how much experience and depth of knowledge is expected from a master’s candidate.

PhD-Level Job Search

Academic Job Search

It’s no secret that faculty-track positions are highly competitive. You will need to put together a comprehensive search campaign, including deciding on where, and to which types of positions, to apply, building your network, securing letters of recommendation, writing a strong CV, and developing an excellent one-hour job talk. Start cultivating your network as early as possible by actively making faculty contacts at Binghamton and other institutions. Attend professional association meetings and professional conferences, and if possible, present at or chair a session. This will build both your CV and your network. Teaching and research will be critical components of your application, so actively seek out teaching and publishing opportunities.


Non-Academic Job Search

There are several things to think about when considering and embarking upon a non-academic search. First, it is important to take time to reflect on your interests and how the skills you developed in your doctoral program might translate into non-faculty roles. PhDs work in nearly every industry, so it can help to speak with professionals who work outside of academia to learn about their experiences, get advice, and begin building a professional network; the Fleishman Center recommends LinkedIn for identifying potential contacts. It is also important to spend time learning how the non-academic job search is structured, and the differences in expectations, timelines and application documents. The Fleishman Center can help you understand and navigate these differences, through one-on-one appointments, programs and resources.

Job Search for International Students

The Fleishman Center has compiled a variety of information and resources to help international students navigate the United States job search process. Learn more about the United States employment process, common cultural barriers faced by international students, immigration and legal processes, and more here.

View All JOB SEARCH Resources

Warning: Employment Scam Targeting College Students

The Federal Bureau of Investigation recently released a public service announcement regarding an employment scam targeting college students:

College students across the United States continue to be targeted in a common employment scam. Scammers advertise phony job opportunities on college employment websites, and/or students receive e-mails on their school accounts recruiting them for fictitious positions. This "employment" results in a financial loss for participating students.

Learn more about how to protect yourself from employment scams here.

Last Updated: 11/16/17