New Courses

Development and Approval
of New Graduate Courses

Course Numbering

All new graduate courses are developed by departments and approved at the school/college level. Contact your dean's office for additional information. All new courses should follow the numbering convention in the bulletin:

500-589 — master’s-level courses: at the option of the instructor (not the student), either S/U or regular letter grading may be used.

590, 592-596 and 598 — internship or practicum courses: at the option of the instructor (not the student), either S/U or regular letter grading may be used.

591 — supervised college teaching of the discipline: only S/U grading may be used.

597 — independent study: at the option of the instructor (not the student), either S/U or regular letter grading may be used.

599 — thesis: only S/U grading may be used.

600-696 — doctoral research seminars: at the option of the instructor (not the student), either S/U or regular letter grading may be used.

697 — independent study at the doctoral level: at the option of the instructor (not the student), either S/U or regular letter grading may be used.

698 — pre-dissertation research: only S/U grading may be used.

699 — dissertation: only S/U grading may be used.

Experimental courses generally run for one semester only. The course number is followed by an "X".

Topics courses have content that changes from semester to semester. The course number is followed by a letter (not "X"). Topics courses that run for more than three years should be made into permanent courses. Topics courses that have not run for four or more years should be deactivated.

Permanent courses have a number that follows the graduate course numbering convention described above and in the bulletin. Permanent courses that have not run for four or more years should be deactivated. Permanent course numbers cannot be reused for a different course for a period of 10 years after deactivation. 

Crosslisting Courses

Doctoral Level Courses (600 level)
600 and 500 level courses can be cross-listed. 600 level courses cannot be cross-listed with undergraduate level (499 and below) courses. 

Masters Level Courses (500 level)
500 and 600 level courses can be cross-listed. 500 level courses can be cross-listed with 400 level courses, provided that the 500 level course has significant elements worthy of graduate credit. If 300 level or lower are to be cross-listed with a 500 level course, approval is required from the Graduate Council*.

Upper Division Courses (300 & 400 level)
Upper division courses can be cross-listed. Upper division courses cannot be cross-listed with lower division courses unless the courses are the same subject. 400 level courses can be cross-listed with 500 level courses. Upper division courses cannot be cross-listed with 600 level courses. Cross-listing 300 level courses with 500 level courses requires Graduate Council approval*.

Lower Division Courses (100 & 200 level)
Lower division courses can be cross-listed. Lower division courses cannot be cross-listed with upper division courses unless the courses are the same subject. Lower division courses cannot be cross-listed with 600 level courses. Cross-listing lower division courses with 500 level courses requires Graduate Council approval*.

*Exceptions: MUSP and THEA courses can cross-list 500 level courses with 100, 200, 300 and 400 level courses as long as all courses are the same subject. ELI courses can cross-list 700 level courses with 100, 200, 300 and 400 level courses as long as all courses are the same level. Approvals are granted only for the semester requested.

New Graduate Course Template

The Graduate Council has developed and approved a new graduate course proposal template. The template includes important information on the new course and all components needed for coursebuilding.

New Graduate Course Proposal Template
New Graduate Course Proposal Template - Harpur College

  1. Listing:
    1. Department/school, course number, title

    2. Credits (if variable, in what range)

    3. Grading (normal, i.e. A through F, or S/U)

    4. Precise, brief catalog description, including prerequisites (follow catalog style)

    5. When offered (Fall, Spring or both)

    6. If you want enrollments to be counted for other than your normal department FTE, please enter the HEGIS code

    7. Is this a fixed course or "topics" course (topics change from semester to semester)?

  2. Reasons

    Explain the reasons for the proposal and the relation between this new course and the existing graduate program.  How does this course fill a need or pre-requisite for the graduate program? Does it complement, overlap, or compete with existing coursework in other programs?  If the course has been taught before as an experimental or topics course, comment on your reasons for wanting to make it permanent.

  3. Currency (Timeliness)

    Explain the course's relation to recent developments and new theories or knowledge in the field. Comment on its relation to current practice and/or the needs of other courses in the program. How is this course speaking to the development of the field itself?

  4. Diversity

    How do the learning objectives of the proposed course relate to the diversity, equity, and inclusion outcomes of the educational program(s) to which it belongs? In what ways do the required learning outcomes address the contributions of underrepresented groups; explore issues related to inequities based on race, gender, ability, socio-economic, or other differences; or otherwise address issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion?

  5. Format

    Describe how the class will be taught (seminar/discussion, lecture, laboratory, tutorial, programmed instruction, workshop, distance education, a combination of these).

  6. Budgetary and resource requirementsDescribe all new requirements associated with this course in the following areas:
    1. Funds

    2. Space and facilities

    3. Staff support

    4. Computers, software, computer time

    5. Laboratory needs

    6. Special scheduling

  7. Library requirements

    Describe any new library services, e.g. online services, databases, or periodicals this course will require, and any area in which the library collections will need enhancement for this course.

  8. Enrollments

    Provide anticipated numbers of students and frequency of offering. Describe the course's relation to requirements of the graduate program, and categories of students who would be likely to take this course.

  9. Interdisciplinary role

    How does this course relate to or complement existing courses in other programs? Does this course fill a need in another graduate program? How have you discussed this course with those programs? Please summarize their responses. It may also be appropriate to attach copies of emails indicating who approved and why.

  10. Undergraduate program

    Is the course taught simultaneously as an undergraduate and graduate course? If so, what differences will distinguish the graduate version? A graduate course co-taught with an undergraduate course must have significant elements that make it graduate-level (e.g., additional assignments and more rigorous grading). 500-level graduate courses may be approved when co-taught with 400-level courses, but will not be approved co-teaching with 100 to 300 level courses.

  11. Approval

    Has the course been approved by the graduate committee of the department or school? Indicate date of approval and chair of committee.