Graduate Community of Scholars (GCOS)

Welcome to the Graduate Community of Scholars!

The Graduate Community of Scholars (GCOS) at Binghamton University offers resources to help you thrive in your personal life and gain a competitive edge in your professional life - whether you're starting your master's degree or completing your doctoral degree.

We are a learning community that welcomes all graduate students, at all levels, in all disciplines.

Each semester, GCOS hosts a series of workshops designed to develop the graduate community as scholars, teachers, professionals and members of the Binghamton University community. These workshops join with various campus organizations, departments, centers or units to tailor the information to the interests and needs of graduate life. These workshops follow the Binghamton University PREP Model, which resolves around four themes and competencies that are vital for every graduate student: planning, resilience, engagement and professionalism.

Planning: Learn skills that emphasize proper planning throughout your graduate career, such as resume- and grant-writing, thinking like a professional and creating a syllabus.

Resilience: Learn strategies to ensure and thrive through writing planning for dissertations and theses and managing mental health as a graduate student.

Engagement: Learn strategies for effective communication, networking, and active involvement in the workplace, classroom and community.

Professionalism: Learn and maintain the highest professional standards in teaching, research and publishing.

These workshops are free and open to all graduate students in all disciplines.

If you are interested in more information or if you have a request for a particular workshop topic, please email Ellen Tilden at gcos@binghamton.edu.

Fall 2022 workshop schedule:

Getting Ready for Fall - Planning Your Writing Project

DATE: Friday, September 9, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
LOCATION: Online (via Zoom)
PRESENTER: Robert Danberg, Coordinator of Campus-Wide Writing Support, The Writing Initiative

In this workshop, you’ll do a step-by-step review of your current writing and research project. You’ll review the current status of the project and begin the process of breaking the project down into tasks and actions. Then, you’ll review those tasks and actions so that you can identify your priorities and goals for your work this semester.  We will also discuss how to sustain yourself (maintain energy, maintain motivation, face setbacks) over the course of a long project.

Conducting A Statistical Project with STATA and R

DATE: Thursday, September 22, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
LOCATION:
Online (via Zoom)
PRESENTER:
Muhammet Furkan Karakaya, Graduate Academic Coding and Statistical Consultant

Running a statistical project can be cumbersome as it requires merging statistical knowledge and coding skills. This workshop will illustrate how to conduct a statistical project in both STATA and R environments. We will discuss how to upload a dataset, check its summary statistics, generate plots of certain variables, and explore correlations between dependent and independent variables.

NSF DDRIG (Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grant) Info Session 

DATE: Friday, September 30, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
LOCATION: Online (via Zoom)
PRESENTER: Dr. Robert (Beau) DiNapoli, Research Development Specialist, Office of Strategic Research Initiatives

This info session will introduce graduate students to the National Science Foundation’s Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grant programs (DDRIG). The DDRIG provides funds up to $20,000 for doctoral students to improve the quality of their dissertation research. An overview of the DDRIG programs, successful proposal preparation, NSF review criteria, and the submission process will be provided. We will also discuss an upcoming DDRIG writing support group for graduate students to help draft and submit their proposals, which will be offered by the Office of Strategic Research Initiatives.  

NSF currently offers the following DDRIG programs: Archaeology; Biological Anthropology; Cultural Anthropology; Decision, Risk, and Management Sciences; Economics; Human-Environment and Geographical Sciences; Law & Science; Linguistics; Methodology, Measurement, and Statistics; Political Science; Science and Technology Studies; and Sociology.

REGISTER HERE.

Defining Your Teaching Philosophy

DATE: Friday, October 7, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
LOCATION: Online (via Zoom)
PRESENTER: Robert Danberg, Coordinator of Campus-Wide Writing Support, The Writing Initiative

When graduate students face the prospect oDef writing the Teaching Philosophy Statement, they often realize that they’ve never quite worked out their philosophy of teaching.

In this workshop, we’ll look at questions to ask yourself about how you approach teaching and how you understand the goals of teaching in your discipline. We’ll explore some resources about teaching that can help you clarify your thinking. This is a workshop for graduate students at any stage in their program or teaching career. 

REGISTER HERE

Writing Your Teaching Philosophy Statement

DATE: Friday, November 11, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
LOCATION: Online (via Zoom)
PRESENTER: Robert Danberg, Coordinator of Campus-Wide Writing Support, The Writing Initiative

Once you've identified your own teaching philosophy, it's time to write your teaching philosophy statement. In this workshop, we will look at examples to identify the features of a teaching philosophy statement with special attention to organization, contents and style. We will also discuss how to adapt your statement to different jobs, as well as strategies for drafting your statement. 

REGISTER HERE

Mathematica Essentials: Introduction & Overview

DATE: Thursday, December 1, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
LOCATION: Online (via Zoom)
PRESENTER: Professor Hiroki Sayama, Systems Science & Industrial Engineering Department

Mathematica is a computer software package for doing mathematical computation and exploration. It contains hundreds of mathematical functions, commands for producing graphics, and a complete programming language. During this one-hour workshop, attendees will get a hands-on introduction to using Mathematica. They will learn how to use Mathematica to create notebooks, perform symbolic and numeric calculations, and generate 2D and 3D graphics. 

REGISTER HERE.

Dissertation Bootcamp

DATES: Monday, January 9 - Friday, January 13
LOCATION: Online (via Zoom)

A week-long, writing intensive workshop for graduate students working on their dissertation or thesis that will consist of morning and afternoon sessions and include "Write on Site" sessions, writing accountability groups, and faculty presentations.  Space is limited and it is expected that students who register will attend all sessions during the week. 

REGISTRATION WILL OPEN IN DECEMBER. 


Past Workshops

SPRING 2022 workshop schedule:

Getting Ready for Spring - Planning Your Writing Project

Friday, February 11, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Robert Danberg, Coordinator of Campus-Wide Writing Support, The Writing Initiative

In this workshop, you’ll do a step-by-step review of your current writing and research project. You’ll review the current status of the project and begin the process of breaking the project down into tasks and actions. Then, you’ll review those tasks and actions so that you can identify your priorities and goals for your work this semester.  We will also discuss how to sustain yourself (maintain energy, maintain motivation, face setbacks) over the course of a long project.

How to Ask for What You Want (and Get It)

Friday, March 4, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Bathabile Mthombeni, University Ombudsman

What is the secret to increasing the likelihood that you'll get what you want when you ask for it? In this session we will explore how to identify what you really want and will reveal the number one mindset shift you can make to make it more likely that you will get it.

The Coding World; Tools and Languages

Wednesday, March 23, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Furkan Karakaya and Sanket Rathod, Graduate Academic Coding Consultants

The coding world in a maze. To find the right path, we must know the basics of this world. In this workshop, we will review the tools and languages that are available to us. Specifically, we will cover Python, R, STATA, JavaScript, Java, HTML and CSS.

Writing Your Teaching Philosophy Statement

Friday, March 25, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Robert Danberg, Coordinator of Campus-Wide Writing Support, The Writing Initiative

Once you've identified your own teaching philosophy, it's time to write your teaching philosophy statement. In this workshop, we will look at examples to identify the features of a teaching philosophy statement with special attention to organization, contents and style. We will also discuss how to adapt your statement to different jobs, as well as strategies for drafting your statement. 

Stress Management Guide for Graduate Students

Thursday, April 7, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Samantha Symes, MHOPE (Mental Health Outreach Peer Educators)

This workshop will focus on stress management and coping techniques, as well as discuss the signs of depression and anxiety, and how to tell the difference. 

Copyright and Your Thesis or Dissertation

Friday, April 8, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Jillian Sandy, Assistant Instruction & Outreach Librarian, University Libraries, and Amy Gay, Assistant Head of Digital Initiatives for Digital Scholarship

Not sure if copyright applies to an image, data, text, or other information in your thesis or dissertation? Librarians can help! This workshop will address copyright considerations from creating your work through submitting the final copy electronically. We will discuss other resources including Creative Commons, Open Access content in the ORB (Open Repository), and additional options for digital projects.  Bring your questions!

Python for Beginners

Wednesday, April 13, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Furkan Karakaya and Sanket Rathod, Graduate Academic Coding Consultants

Python is one of the most popular languages in the coding world. It is used for data wrangling, exploration, analysis, and visualization. This workshop will illustrate the basic functions, packages, and integrated development environments (IDE's) that are available for users.

Introduction to Text Analysis

Wednesday, May 4, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Dr. Jeremy Blackburn, Department of Computer Science

Text analysis offers a powerful data-gathering process to extract meaning from digital text. This workshop will examine methods and practices for text analysis. We will cover the major techniques for mining and analyzing text data to discover interesting patterns, extract useful knowledge, support decision making, and find and prepare texts. To do so, we cover computational text analysis techniques and statistical approaches that can be generally applied to arbitrary text data in any natural language. You will learn the basic concepts, principles, and major algorithms in text mining and their potential applications. The goal of the workshop is for you to walk away knowing how to assemble a corpus and some of the tools available to analyze it.

Getting Ready for Summer - Planning Your Writing Project

Friday, May 13, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Robert Danberg, Coordinator of Campus-Wide Writing Support, The Writing Initiative

In this workshop, you’ll do a step-by-step review of your current writing and research project. You’ll review the current status of the project and begin the process of breaking the project down into tasks and actions. Then, you’ll review those tasks and actions so that you can identify your priorities and goals for your work this summer.  We will also discuss how to sustain yourself (maintain energy, maintain motivation, face setbacks) over the course of a long project.

FALL 2021 workshop schedule:

Getting Ready for Fall - Part I: Set Your Writing Project Goals

Friday, September 10, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Robert Danberg, Coordinator of Campus-Wide Writing Support, The Writing Initiative

In Part One of this two-part series of guided workshops, you’ll do a step-by-step review of your current writing and research project. You’ll review the current status of the project and begin the process of breaking the project down into tasks and actions. Then, you’ll review those tasks and actions so that you can identify your priorities and goals for your work this semester.  We will also discuss how to sustain yourself (maintain energy, maintain motivation, face setbacks) over the course of a long project.

Getting Ready for Fall - Part II: Map Your Goals to Time

Friday, September 17, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Robert Danberg, Coordinator of Campus-Wide Writing Support, The Writing Initiative

In Part Two of this two-part series of guided workshops, you’ll explore how you can map your priorities and goals to the time available.  We will do a step-by-step review of your time commitments so that you can identify the best times for you to write. We will discuss how to organize your writing sessions so that you can use your time well and discuss strategies that help writers maintain motivation and maintain a sense of control over the process, such as routine reflection.  We’ll continue a discussion of how to prioritize sustaining yourself even when you feel as though you have no time.

Teaching Assistant (TA) Training Workshop

Friday, October 1, Noon - 2:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Andrea MacArgel & Cherie Vanputten, Center for Learning and Teaching (CLT)

Join us to learn more about improving your teaching skills, overcoming common classroom issues, and developing active learning strategies for your students.

Defining Your Teaching Philosophy

Friday, October 8, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Robert Danberg, Coordinator of Campus-Wide Writing Support, The Writing Initiative

When graduate students face the prospect of writing the Teaching Philosophy Statement, they often realize that they’ve never quite worked out their philosophy of teaching.

In this workshop, we’ll look at questions to ask yourself about how you approach teaching and how you understand the goals of teaching in your discipline. We’ll explore some resources about teaching that can help you clarify your thinking. This is a workshop for graduate students at any stage in their program or teaching career. 

Dissertation Bootcamp

Monday, January 10 - Friday, January 14
Online (via Zoom)

A week-long, writing intensive workshop for graduate students working on their dissertation or thesis that will consist of morning and afternoon sessions and include "Write on Site" sessions, writing accountability groups, and faculty presentations.  Space is limited and it is expected that students who register will attend all sessions during the week.