News

July 2019

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Mark Poliks

Binghamton University's new Center for Flexible Hybrid Medical Device Manufacturing has been designated a Center for Advanced Technology and will receive nearly $8.8 million in funding during the next 10 years, Empire State Development's Division of Science, Technology and Innovation (NYSTAR) announced. For more information, please click here. 

May 2019

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Shawn Sallis

After completing his Ph.D. in materials science at Binghamton University, Shawn Sallis joined the Advanced Light Source as a postdoc. For the last four years he’s worked with Wanli Yang on higher-capacity batteries. Read more about Shawn's Post-Doctoral Fellowship at ALS.


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Art matters exhibit

Art Matters. Science Matters. Materials Matter. A seed grant funded exhibition that served as an incubator for the Natioanl Endowment for the Humanities funded Materials Matter course was featured in the latest issue of the Binghamton University Magazine.


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Professor Gokhan Ersan

Assistant Professor, Department of Art and Design, Gokhan Ersan, is the winner of the Binghamton University Harpur Subvention Award for Art and Design. His submission is entitled, "Cognitive art of atomic bonding: from ball-and-stick to molecular orbital (MO) theory, and beyond".


April 2019

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Christopher Singh

Christopher N. Singh, graduate student and winner of the poster award, represented  the MURI team at the "Physics of Artificial Intelligence" conference held at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights on Friday, April 26, 2019. The poster highlighted the collaborative efforts of the MURI team, while focusing on recent theoretical results connecting quantum waves to brain inspired circuits. The work was awarded first place in the poster competition with a cash prize of $150.


March 2019

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Advanced Light Source (ALS)

Researchers used the Advanced Light Source (ALS), in collaboration with Dr. Louis Piper, have quantified a strong, beneficial, and reversible (over hundreds of cycles) chemical reaction involving oxygen ions in the crystal lattice of battery electrode materials. The results open up new ways to explore how to pack more energy into batteries with electrodes made out of low-cost, common materials.


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The HydroGEN consortium

The HydroGEN consortium has entered into new collaborations with four National Science Foundation (NSF) projects linking academic research in energy materials with the Department of Energy EERE Energy Materials Network, leveraging the world class capability nodes of the national-labs. Four innovative energy material research projects, anchored at Pennsylvania State University, the Colorado School of Mines, and University at Buffalo (in Collaboration with Dr. Louis Piper at Binghamton University), were selected to work with the HydroGEN cross-lab consortium. HydroGEN team members at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) will add their expertise and capabilities to the research projects, which are already underway through the NSF Designing Materials to Revolutionize and Engineer our Future (DMREF) program. Learn more about the four innovative energy material research projects.


February 2019

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DOE Office of Science

Director Piper's work on "New Water Splitting Catalyst Could Make it Easier to Generate Solar Fuel" has been publicized on the DOE Office of Science website. The key idea is to generate a solar fuel: hydrogen gas, which can be burnt to release energy on demand without releasing carbon dioxide," said Binghamton University Associate Professor of Physics Louis Piper. "For water splitting, we use visible light to generate photo-excited negative electrons and positive holes that are then separated in order to catalyze water into oxygen and hydrogen gases. Storing gases is more straightforward (and cheaper) than employing battery set-ups, so this approach has the benefit of clean energy harvesting and storage." For more information, click here. 


January 2019

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Easter Island Statues

Dr. Carl Lipo's work on the "Easter Island Statues, Mystery Behind Their Location Revealed" was featured in The Guardian, finding that the statues were built next to fresh water. The huge stone figures of Easter Island have beguiled explorers, researchers and the wider world for centuries, but now experts say they have cracked one of the biggest mysteries: why the statues are where they are. Researchers say they have analysed the locations of the megalithic platforms, or ahu, on which many of the statues known as moai sit, as well as scrutinising sites of the island's resources, and have discovered the structures are typically found close to sources of fresh water. They say the finding backs up the idea that aspects of the construction of the platforms and statues, such as their size, could be tied to the abundance and quality of such supplies.


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Director Louis Piper

Director Louis Piper was featured in Phys Org for his work on water splitting catalysts. Water splitting, the process of harvesting solar energy to generate energy-dense fuels, could be simplified thanks to new research including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. "The key idea is to generate a solar fuel: hydrogen gas, which can be burnt to release energy on demand without releasing carbon dioxide," said Binghamton University Associate Professor of Physics Louis Piper. "For water splitting, we use visible light to generate photo-excited negative electrons and positive holes that are then separated in order to catalyze water into oxygen and hydrogen gases. Storing gases is more straightforward (and cheaper) than employing battery set-ups, so this approach has the benefit of clean energy harvesting and storage." 


November, 2018

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MetamorWorks / Getty Images

Drs. Louis Piper and Wei-Cheng Lee of IMR, along with researchers at Georgia Tech, are working on developing a kind of neuristor circuit that will allow all device processing to take place at the chip level, meaning there'll be no network load or indeed any requirement to communicate using a network at all. Neuristor circuits are brain-copying computer chips. Read more about in the Network World article found online.


October, 2018

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Chancellor's Award Image Credit: Jonathan Cohen.

Director Louis Piper is the winner of the Chancellor's Award of Excellence of Scholarship and Creative Activities at Binghamton University. The Chancellor Award, given by the SUNY Chancellor Kristina M. Johnson, is a special honor in recognition of outstanding service to the University. This award was presented to Dr. Piper at a special awards ceremony on October 9, 2018.


September, 2018

The Institute for Materials Research - 2.0 (IMR-2.0) Organized Research Center has been established. IMR-2.0 is looking to pursue research collaborations in the areas of Smart Energy Materials and Interfaces.