Center for the Study of the 1960s

Binghamton University Libraries Center for the Study of the 1960s is the nation's first virtual center promoting excellence in research, scholarship, teaching and programs in the social, cultural and political history of the United States during the 1960s. Thanks to the generosity of alumni Stephen R. McKiernan, Binghamton University Libraries was able to launch the Center in fall 2017.

 More about the CenteR

The Center for the Study of the 1960s is the nation’s first virtual center promoting excellence in research, scholarship, teaching and programs in the social, cultural and political history of the United States during the 1960s.
The focus of the Center is research and scholarship, which it collects, organizes, disseminates, and generates in collaboration with faculty and students at the University and beyond. An intellectual forum for academic discourse, the Center offers innovative programming (e.g., conferences, colloquia, exhibits, and workshops) and publications in both virtual and traditional formats.
An innovation hub, the Center is breaking new ground in its approach to applying technology to research, scholarship and pedagogy. The Center is a public resource with its website presenting the best scholarship on one of our nation’s most significant eras.
The Libraries have already begun to draw together items from our collections to comprise part of the Center.   Browse the Libraries' 1960s collection in the Library Catalog.
Click here to support the Center for the Study of the 1960s.

Center for the Study of the 1960s Events

Binghamton University Homecoming, Class of 1967 50th Anniversary Luncheon
October 7, 2017 (Registration required).  

Grateful Dead Concert Replay
Re-playing of the May 2, 1970 performance of the Grateful Dead at Harpur College
9 pm - Midnight.  October 7, 2017 

Summer of Love Exhibit
Through October 8, 2017. 
Click here to support the Summer of Love Exhibit. 

Summer of Love

 

Resources 

Our intention is to provide curated access to or information about resources pertaining primarily to the social, cultural and political history of the United States during the 1960s. The Center takes an expansive view of the "1960s," and considers the period from the beginning of the Kennedy Administration through the end of direct American involvement in the Vietnam War to be within its purview.

The Libraries have already begun to draw together items from our collections to comprise part of the Center. Browse the Libraries' 1960s collection in the Library Catalog.

Civil rights

 Civil Rights Digital Library 
"The Civil Rights Digital Library is a comprehensive meta-archive, bringing together primary source materials from the collections of many libraries, museums, public broadcasters, and other organizations. The collection is well cataloged and easily searchable and browsable. There is a particularly strong collection of unedited news footage, which could be of particular interest for classroom instructors. There is also a large collection of links to secondary educational materials, including lesson plans, instructional materials, and bibliographies.” 1
Access: http://crdl.usg.edu/ 

Voices from the Southern Civil Rights Movement
"This archive provides access to digital files of noncommercial radio programs from the 1950s and 1960s, documenting the experiences of activists in the Civil Rights Movement. Programs include interviews with well-known civil rights figures and unknown participants, and documents activities such as sit-ins and boycotts. Ideological issues such as nonviolence, the development of the Black Power movement, and reactions to white resistance are explored through first-person accounts. This archive illustrates how journalism produced during historic events can be valuable source material for later research.”
Access: http://americanarchive.org/exhibits/civil-rights

Wisconsin Historical Society: Freedom Summer Collection
"The Wisconsin Historical Society Collection is a valuable digital archive of civil rights material related to the Freedom Summer of 1964. These include photographs, posters, and visual materials that are free for nonprofit educational use. There are records from major organizations, such as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and personal papers from major movement leaders, as well as letters and first-person accounts of the everyday students involved. The collection is a deep dive into a particularly interesting time in the civil rights struggle and offers many opportunities for primary source research.” 3
Access: http://content.wisconsinhistory.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/p15932coll2/

Political and Social Activism

The Digger Archives Access
"The Digger Archives is an ongoing Web project to preserve and present the history of the anarchist guerrilla street theater group that challenged the emerging Counterculture of the Sixties and whose actions and ideals inspired (and continue to inspire) a generation (of all ages) to create models of Free Association.” Access: http://www.diggers.org/overview.htm
The Pacifica Radio/UC Berkeley Social Activism Sound Recording Project
“UC-Berkeley was a hotbed of student activism during the Vietnam era, and Pacifica Radio reporters covered most of the major events of that time. This website provides a timeline of antiwar actions in California with links to audio, video, and primary sources such as newspaper articles. While the timeline is extensive, unfortunately many of the links require UC library access, and the age of the site (it was first created in the 1990s) means the audio clips are short and of low quality.”
Access: http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC/pacificaviet.html
Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee
“SNCC Digital Gateway - The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) was the only national civil rights organization led by young people. Organized in 1960 and mentored by legendary Black organizer, Ella Baker, SNCC activists became full-time organizers, working with community leaders to build local grassroots organizations in the Deep South.”
Access: https://snccdigital.org/#sncc-home-content

Vietnam War

Vietnam Center and Archive
The Vietnam Center and Archive at Texas Tech University collects and preserves the documentary record of the Vietnam War, and supports and encourages research and education regarding all aspects of the American Vietnam Experience.
Access: https://www.vietnam.ttu.edu
Research in Military Records: Vietnam War.
"This site is the National Archives portal to their records on the Vietnam War. Most of the records relate to casualty counts, available for both the United States and Vietnamese. U.S. casualty counts are further broken down by state, year, branch of service, and other pertinent factors. Files on prisoners of war and soldiers missing in action can also be searched and downloaded in PDF form.”
Access: http://www.archives.gov/research/military/vietnam-war/
Vietnam War Bibliography
"A compilation of hundreds of books, articles, and dissertations by Edwin Moise, professor of history at Clemson University. France has a long history of involvement in Vietnam, and some researchers will surely appreciate the inclusion on this list of several French-language sources. While its length and layout make this bibliography appear daunting at first, very specific categories help the user find materials on their topic. Another helpful feature—many entries are also annotated."
Access: http://edmoise.sites.clemson.edu/bibliography.html

Women’s Liberation Movement

Women’s Liberation Movement Print Culture Collection at Duke University
“This collection contains manifestos, speeches, essays and other materials documenting various aspects of the Women’s Movement in the United States in the 1960s and 1970s. The Women’s Liberation Movement refers to a series of campaigns for reforms on issues such as reproductive rights, domestic violence, and equal pay. Feminist print culture, such as the examples provided in the collection, supported and sustained the Women’s Movement and connect it to other movements for social justice.” 10 
Access: http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/wlmpc/

For Further Reading

Bibliography

1Jennifer Kaari “Social activism in the United States: Digital collection and primary sources.” College and Research Libraries News, Vol 78, No 8 (2017) http://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/issue/view/1081
2Jennifer Kaari “Social activism in the United States: Digital collection and primary sources.” College and Research Libraries News, Vol 78, No 8 (2017) http://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/issue/view/1081
3Jennifer Kaari “Social activism in the United States: Digital collection and primary sources.”College and Research Libraries News, Vol 78, No 8 (2017) http://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/issue/view/1081
4 The Digger Archives (www.diggers.org) / CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 /
5Seth Kershner and Michael Mannheim “A guide to Vietnam War resources: Government documents, oral histories, antiwar movements” College and Research Libraries News Vol 76 No 9 (2015)
6Made possible by the generous support of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the SNCC Digital Gateway: Learn from the Past, Organize for the Future, Make Democracy Work is a collaborative project of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC—pronounced “Snick”) Legacy Project, Duke’s Center for Documentary Studies, and Duke University Libraries.”
7Seth Kershner and Michael Mannheim “A guide to Vietnam War resources: Government documents, oral histories, antiwar movements” College and Research Libraries News Vol 76 No 9 (2015)
8 Seth Kershner and Michael Mannheim “A guide to Vietnam War resources: Government documents, oral histories, antiwar movements” College and Research Libraries News Vol 76 No 9 (2015)
9 Seth Kershner and Michael Mannheim “A guide to Vietnam War resources: Government documents, oral histories, antiwar movements” College and Research Libraries News Vol 76 No 9 (2015)
10Ginny Daley, Anne Valk, Rosalyn Baxandall and Linda Gordon, Women’s Liberation Movement Print Culture Collection, 1997-

Last Updated: 9/30/17