February 29, 2024
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Kanad Ghose named a 2016 National Academy of Inventors Fellow

Professor Kanad Ghose from the Computer Science Department at the Watson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Professor Kanad Ghose from the Computer Science Department at the Watson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.
Professor Kanad Ghose from the Computer Science Department at the Watson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Image Credit: Jonathan Cohen, Binghamton University.

Computer science Professor Kanad Ghose has been named a 2016 Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

Election to NAI Fellow status is a high professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society.

Ghose and other 2016 Fellows will be inducted on April 6, 2017, as part of the Sixth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston.

During his career, Ghose has researched high-performance computing and computer architecture. His most recent patents are on power management and security. The work has resulted in several breakthrough designs in processor architecture, power-aware systems and high-performance computing infrastructures, setting the stage for better and faster computing power and function. Much of the work he and his students do is in partnership with scientists from IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Intel and BAE Systems, among many others.

Ghose has 21 U.S. patents. Four of them are licensed and he is the sole inventor of 17.

His work on run-time communications and a parallel programming library for a chip multiprocessor (for Lockheed-Martin) and a real-time Avionics file system (for BAE Corporation) have been transitioned to industry applications.

Ghose was chair of the Computer Science Department for nearly two decades before stepping down this semester. He has over 130 peer-reviewed technical publications in his research areas in journals and conferences and has directed 30 PhD candidates.

With the election of the 2016 class there are now 757 NAI Fellows, representing 229 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2016 Fellows are named inventors on 5,437 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 26,000.

The National Academy of Inventors is a 501(c)(3) non-profit member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 3,000 individual inventor members and fellows spanning more than 240 institutions. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society.