Frequently asked questions

Updated at noon Friday, July 10, 2020

Frequently asked questions

These questions and answers have been developed to respond to feedback on Binghamton University's draft Restarting Binghamton Plan. This is a fluid process and the answers to the questions may change between now and the beginning of the fall semester. We will continue to update, and time stamp, this page as new information becomes available and new questions arise, and deliver our Restarting Plan once it has been approved by SUNY and the governor.


Search for terms within our FAQ page. Enter a search term, hit search and responses will open and be highlighted. Scroll down to find the highlighted sections.


Sections:


Move-in

  • When will I know what my assigned move-in time is?

    The University is continuing to work on details for move-in, which will take place over a series of days from Aug. 19-Aug. 25. Residential Life will send more detailed information to students via their Binghamton University email address at the end of July.

  • Can I change the time if I have a conflict?

    Students should make every attempt to arrive at their assigned move-in date/time. Contact Residential Life (reslife@binghamton.edu) at least 15 days before your scheduled arrival date/time only if it is not possible to arrive to campus at your assigned time due to extenuating circumstances. Exceptions will be made on a very limited basis.

  • Why can't my family help me move in?

    To keep everyone safe, the campus is modifying its traditional move-in process to allow for testing of students and the appropriate flow of students on to campus and into any particular residence hall. To best ensure the health and safety of other residents as well as Residential Life staff, and to give us the best chance of being able to maintain in-person instruction throughout the semester, we are limiting the number of people allowed into a building to residents only, who will have been tested. This policy will remain in effect during the academic year as well, when guests will not be allowed in residence halls. 

  • How many people can accompany me and what help will I have moving into the residence hall? 

    Two familiy members or friends can accompany a student to campus to move in, but they will not be allowed into the residence halls. Students will have to move themselves in, but the University will provide assistance such as laundry carts to transport belongings. Students are encouraged to plan ahead to limit what you bring to what you can carry yourself. Any student with a disability related need for assistance to move in must contact Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) at ssd@binghamton.edu or 607-777-2686 at least 10 days in advance of their move-in date to request University assistance.

  • Should I quarantine myself before I come to campus?

    Epidemiologists have advised us that they recommend a quarantine of 5 days before arriving to campus.


Housing


Costs


Student course options/academic testing

  • How do I understand what I’m seeing in the schedule of classes?

    The fall 2020 schedule shows courses offered in multiple formats:

    • A/B alternating week model:
      • A course on the A/B alternating week model will meet in a campus space one week and online the next week, alternating back and forth for the rest of the semester.
      • In the Course Schedule, these courses show up with DI Learn for the online weeks and a campus location/room number for the in-class weeks. If you use the “Week at a Glance” feature in My.Binghamton.edu, each week your calendar will indicate whether the course is online or in the classroom.
      • Here is an example of what a course on the A/B alternating week model looks like in the schedule of classes. The “Date” and “Location” columns show which weeks you’re in the classroom and which weeks you’re online:

        Sample class, Nutritonal Anthropology, with days, times, dates and locations the class is being held thoughout the semester. Date and Location are highlighted. UU120 is in person every other week, DI Learn is online the other weeks

    • Student Rotation model: Some classes (typically larger ones, but a few others as well) will have groups of students taking turns “rotating” into the classroom each day because the room is not large enough (with social distancing) to hold all of the students in the class at the same time.
      • Each “rotation section” will be assigned a specific day of the course meet pattern for in-person attendance.
      • For class days when a section is not assigned to be in the classroom, students in that section will participate online in real time.
      • Currently, all students’ schedules show them scheduled in person all days; in August, registered students will be evenly divided into sections and each section will have in-person and online days assigned.
      • Check your schedule before classes start to find out which day you will attend in person. This will show up in your “Week at a Glance” feature in My.Binghamton.edu.
      • Here is what the schedule of classes looks like now for these courses:

        Sample class, Humor in Film, with days, times, date and locations the class is being held thoughout the semester. Date and Location are highlighted. This class is being held in person the first half of the semester and online the second half of the semester

        Here is what the schedule of classes will look like in August after sections have been created to assign students to specific days for in-person attendance. This shows one of the sections for a Tuesday/Thursday course — this one is the section that will be in the classroom on Tuesdays and online on Thursdays:

        Sample class, Humor in Film, with days, times, date and locations the class is being held thoughout the semester. Date and Location are highlighted. This class is being held in person on Tuesdays and online on Thursday for the first half of the semester and all online the second half of the semster

      • Online: Some courses will be completely online. For these, there will be only one line on the schedule and the course will list only “DI Learn” as a location.

        Sample class, Sun, Stars And Galaxies, with days, times, date and locations the class is being held thoughout the semester. Date and Location are highlighted. This class is being held online the whole semester.

      • Combination: Some courses have multiple parts. For example, a lecture and discussion. You are required to register for both parts of the course. The different parts of the course may be taught in different ways. For example, the lecture might be online and the discussion section is in the A/B alternating week model, or the lecture is online and the discussion section is in the rotation model, or both the lecture and discussion are online. Here are some examples.

        Lecture online, discussion section in A/B alternating week model:

        Sample class, Western Civilization, with days, times, date and locations the class is being held thoughout the semester. This class has two parts, a lecture part and a discussion part split into an A and B section. The A and B sections alternates each week.

        Lecture on the Student Rotation model and discussion section in the A/B alternating week model:

        Sample class, Stats for Biologist, with days, times, date and locations the class is being held thoughout the semester. This class has two parts, the lecture part is being held in person for the first half of the semester and online the second half of the semester. The second part of the class is for discussion, which is split into an A and B section. The A and B sections alternates each week.

        In the example below, there are two combinations of a discussion and lab. The first combination has the discussion and lab both online. The second combination has the discussion and lab both on the A/B alternating week mode with the discussion section meeting in person one week and then online the next, and the lab meeting in person on weeks when the discussion is meeting online and online when the discussion is meeting in person.

        Sample class, Modeling and Simulation, with days, times, date and locations the class is being held thoughout the semester. The first combination has the discussion and lab both online. The second combination has the discussion and lab both on the A/B alternating week mode with the discussion section meeting in person one week and then online the next, and the lab meeting in person on weeks when the discussion is meeting online and online when the discussion is meeting in person.

        For each of these meeting patterns, your online “Week at a Glance” in My.Binghamton.edu will show which days you’re in class and which days you’re online.

  • I’ve heard about Bingflex and Hybrid. What’s the difference between these and which one are we using?

    Binghamton is actually using both models, which are explained here:

    Bingflex is the term we’re using to describe the way many of our courses will be taught this fall; some students will be in the classroom and others will participate simultaneously online. Students are either in the online section or the in-person section and don’t switch back and forth. The only exceptions are if a student is ill or quarantined/isolated and should not go to class, or if an instructor is unable to teach in person for a period of time. All courses with the Student Rotation model will be Bingflex. Courses in the A/B model will be Bingflex if any student registered in the course requests to be fully online for the semester.

    For all courses that have an in-person section and a simultaneous online section, we will be using the Bingflex model.

    Hybrid is a course that requires some in-person attendance and some online attendance. All courses in the A/B model are hybrid because they meet in person one week and online the next.

    Note: A/B alternating week courses will use the Bingflex model for the weeks when they’re in the classroom if one or more students registered for the course have chosen to be fully online for the semester, or if a student gets ill/quarantined during the semester.

  • I’m enrolled in an in-person section of a course that has a Bingflex online section. Can I just participate online when I feel like it?
    • No. If you are enrolled in the in-person section of the course, instructors expect you to be in class and regular attendance policies will apply. You can’t choose to be online some days and in class other days.
    • If you get sick or are asked to go into temporary quarantine or isolation, you will temporarily participate online while you are unable to attend in person. Inform your instructor and follow carefully any University health instructions that you are given.
  • If I have a class in the Student Rotation model, can I attend class on a different day than the one I am scheduled?

    No. You can only attend the in-person class on the day listed in your schedule in BU BRAIN because section sizes and room capacity are carefully matched. Currently, your schedule for a Student Rotation course reflects all days of the week that the course meets. In August, the day you are scheduled to attend in person will be reflected in your “Week at a Glance” schedule feature in my.Binghamton.edu.

  • Currently, I’m registered for at least one course that has an in-person component but I’d like to choose to be fully online. Can I do that?

    Yes, you can be fully online, but there are a few things to consider:

    • Some courses (including some lab courses, activity sections or performance courses) require in-person attendance. (Find the list of these courses online.) If you want to be fully online, you’ll need to take these courses at a later date.
    • All other courses can be taken fully online.
    • To switch to fully online, send an email to registrar@binghamton.edu. If you’re registered for a course that can only be taken in person, we'll contact you to talk about changing your schedule. Otherwise, we’ll create an online section of the course and put you in it.
  • Can a student living on campus choose to be fully online?

    Yes, but there are a few things to consider:

    • Some courses (mostly lab courses, activity sections or performance courses) require in-person attendance. (Find the list of these courses online.) If you want to be fully online, you’ll need to take these courses at a later date.
    • All other courses can be taken fully online.
    • To switch to fully online, send an email to registrar@binghamton.edu. If you’re registered for a course that can only be taken in person, we'll contact you to talk about changing your schedule. Otherwise, we’ll create an online section of the course and put you in it.
  • I have two courses scheduled online and two others scheduled in person. Can I choose to switch one of my in-person courses to online but not the other?
    • No, not now. You can request to be fully online for all the courses in your current schedule, but not for individual courses.
    • If you want to change individual courses, you will have a chance to adjust your schedule during the adjustment period in August. You can drop an in-person course and add an online course if it is not a restricted online section available only to fully online students.
    • Note: Restricted online sections of courses are the online sections (if they exist) of courses scheduled on the A/B Alternating Week model, or the Student Rotation model. Only students who have opted to be fully online can register for these online sections.
  • I am enrolled in a course that is listed as “Required In-person” but I have concerns about being on campus this fall. What should I do?
    • If you are not a graduating senior, you may want to discuss this with your departmental advisor or the director of undergraduate studies in your major department. You can request to be fully online by sending an email to registrar@binghamton.edu. You will be contacted with information about changing your schedule. You will have a chance to take the “in-person required” course at a later date.
    • If you are a graduating senior and the course is required for graduation, contact your departmental advisor or the director of undergraduate studies in your major department for assistance.
  • I saw that some online courses will have in-person tests. Will I be required to take in-person tests if all my courses are online?

    It depends on your schedule and where you live.

    • Students who are taking all their courses online and living off campus WILL NOT be required to take in-person tests and exams. Faculty will make other arrangements for academic assessments for these students; these assessments may not be identical to the in-person tests.
    • Students who are taking all their classes online and living on campus WILL need to take in-person tests if instructors schedule them.
    • Students who have some courses in person and some courses online WILL need to take in-person tests if instructors schedule them, regardless of where they live.
  • On the schedule, there is one version of a course offered in person and another version of the same course offered fully online. Can I choose which one I want to take or must I take the in-person version?
    • That depends. Some online versions of courses are available only to students who are fully online. These are designated as "ROL-Restricted Online Only." Only students who have opted to be fully online can take those courses. The example below shows a course where the online version is restricted to fully online students.

      schedule of classes with date and location highlighted

    • If the course has an in-person and a fully online version that is not designated as "Restricted Online Only," you can choose the version that fits your schedule and preference, as long as you meet the other registration requirements and prerequisites. The example below shows a course where there are in-person and online versions available and there is no restriction for fully online students.

      schedule of classes with date and location highlighted

  • I see a course that shows an online section. How can I tell if the online section is restricted or open to everyone?
    • Courses designated as "ROL-Restricted Online Only" are available only to students who have opted to be fully online. If a course has that designation, only students who are fully online can take that version. If that designation is not on the course, anyone who meets the registration and prerequisite requirements can take the couse online. The example below shows a course where the online version is restricted to fully online students.

      schedule of classes with date and location highlighted

  • Is it possible that the Schedule of Classes will change again?

    Yes. We may need to make further changes based on health and safety concerns or government directives.

  • When can I make changes to my schedule?
    • For transfer students and incoming first-year students, initial course selections will be made at the time of their advising appointment in the summer. Further adjustment can be made during the adjustment period in August or during the add/drop period.
    • For continuing students, selections can be made/changed during the adjustment period in August or during the add/drop period.
  • If my online course has in-person tests, how will I find out the schedule?

    Space for in-person tests will be available during the following weeks, typically during your scheduled class time:

    • Sept. 14-18
    • Oct. 5-9
    • Oct. 26-30

    In addition, two-hour tests will be held Nov 22-24, when classes are not in session. A few courses (e.g. MATH 223, 224, 225, 226, 227) with special requirements or schedules may have slight modifications to this schedule.

    Information about in-person test requirements and dates will be included in course syllabi.

  • Can I still take in-person tests if my instructor schedules them even if I’m fully online and not living on campus?

    Once the semester begins, contact your instructor to inquire.

  • What happens if I change my mind after classes begin?
    • For questions about your Housing License and the Housing License Addendum, check out the Housing section of these FAQs.
    • For questions about your courses:
      • Students can make changes to their schedule during the add/drop period as usual.
      • Students registered for one or more courses with an in-person meeting pattern who wish to change to fully online should contact registrar@binghamton.edu.
      • Students who wish to drop classes or withdraw from the University at any time will follow regular University procedures.
  • What about students who do not have sufficiently powered devices to accommodate online learning?

    The Center for Learning and Teaching (CLT) has created an Equipment Request Form for students to request a laptop, Wi-Fi HotSpot or other electronic equipment. All efforts will be made to expedite requests; however, due to high demand, the CLT cannot guarantee the fulfillment of your request. 


Faculty course information/academic testing

  • Why is the Schedule of Classes so complicated: Online, A/B Alternating Weeks, Student Rotation?

    The biggest factor is the need to reduce density in classrooms. When we calculated classroom capacity with 6-foot spacing between individuals, we were left with only about 45 of our general purpose classrooms able to hold 20 or more students. Only 20 classrooms can hold more than 30 students, and only six can hold more than 40 students. The schedule was developed to give as many courses as possible a chance for in-person instruction within those space constraints. 

    Faculty indicated their strong preference for in-person courses. Students said the same thing and told us that having in-person courses and activities was a big part of their decision to come back this fall. International students aren’t allowed to be here if they don’t have an in-person class. Using the A/B model gives twice as many courses a chance for an in-person presence and using the Student Rotation model allows some of our larger courses a chance for in-person instruction. 

  • How do I understand what I’m seeing in the schedule of classes?

    The fall 2020 schedule shows courses offered in multiple formats:

    A/B alternating week model

    • A course on the A/B alternating week model will meet in a campus space one week and online the next week, alternating back and forth for the rest of the semester.
    • In the Course Schedule, these courses show up with DI Learn for the online weeks and a campus location/room number for the in-class weeks. When faculty use the “Week at a Glance” feature in My.Binghamton.edu, their calendar will indicate whether the course is online or in the classroom that week.

    Here is an example of what a course on the A/B alternating week model looks like in the schedule of classes. The “Date” and “Location” columns show which weeks you’re in the classroom and which weeks you’re online:

    Sample class, Nutritonal Anthropology, with days, times, dates and locations the class is being held thoughout the semester. Date and Location are highlighted. UU120 is in person every other week, DI Learn is online the other weeks

    Student Rotation model

    Some classes (typically larger ones, but a few others as well) will have groups of students taking turns “rotating” into the classroom each day because the room is not large enough (with social distancing) to hold all of the students in the class at the same time. Each “rotation section” will be assigned a specific day of the course meet pattern for in-person attendance.

    • For class days when a section is not assigned to be in the classroom, students in that section will participate online in real time.
    • Currently, all students’ schedules show them scheduled in person all days; in August, registered students will be evenly divided into sections and each section will have in-person and online days assigned.
    • Students will need to check their schedule before classes start to find out which day they will attend in person. This will show up in students’ “Week at a Glance” feature in My.Binghamton.edu.
    • Courses are labeled “SRM” in the Special Course Attribute Column in the Schedule of Classes.

    Here is what the schedule of classes looks like now for these courses: 

    Sample class, Humor in Film, with days, times, date and locations the class is being held thoughout the semester. Date and Location are highlighted. This class is being held in person the first half of the semester and online the second half of the semester

    Here is what the schedule of classes will look like in August after sections have been created to assign students to specific days for in-person attendance. This shows one of the sections for a Tuesday/Thursday course — this one is the section for students who will be in the classroom on Tuesdays and online on Thursdays: 

    Sample class, Humor in Film, with days, times, date and locations the class is being held thoughout the semester. Date and Location are highlighted. This class is being held in person the first half of the semester and online the second half of the semester

    Online

    Some courses will be completely online. For these, there will be only one line on the schedule and the course will list only “DI Learn” as a location.

    Sample class, Sun, Stars And Galaxies, with days, times, date and locations the class is being held thoughout the semester. Date and Location are highlighted. This class is being held online the whole semester.

    Combination

    Some courses have multiple parts. For example, a lecture and discussion, and students are required to register for both parts of the course. The different parts of the course may be taught in different ways. For example, the lecture might be online and the discussion section is in the A/B alternating week model, or the lecture is online and the discussion section is in the rotation model, or both the lecture and discussion are online. Here are some examples.

    Lecture online, discussion section in A/B alternating week model:

    Sample class, Western Civilization, with days, times, date and locations the class is being held thoughout the semester. This class has two parts, a lecture part and a discussion part split into an A and B section. The A and B sections alternates each week.

    Lecture on the Student Rotation model and discussion section in the A/B alternating week model:

    Sample class, Humor in Film, with days, times, date and locations the class is being held thoughout the semester. Date and Location are highlighted. This class is being held in person the first half of the semester and online the second half of the semester

    In the example below, there are two combinations of a discussion and lab. The first combination has the discussion and lab both online. The second combination has the discussion and lab both on the A/B alternating week mode with the discussion section meeting in person one week and then online the next, and the lab meeting in person on weeks when the discussion is meeting online and online when the discussion is meeting in person.

    Sample class, Modeling and Simulation, with days, times, date and locations the class is being held thoughout the semester. The first combination has the discussion and lab both online. The second combination has the discussion and lab both on the A/B alternating week mode with the discussion section meeting in person one week and then online the next, and the lab meeting in person on weeks when the discussion is meeting online and online when the discussion is meeting in person.

    For each of these meeting patterns, faculty's online “Week at a Glance” in My.Binghamton.edu will show which days they should be in class and which days they will be online.

  • My class or section is scheduled in an A/B alternating week model or a Student Rotation model. Can I switch it to fully online?

    Contact your dean’s office. Courses scheduled with an in-person component in one of these models have been carefully selected to offer as many students as possible across all departments, majors and levels access to in-person instruction. Your dean’s office can discuss any concerns you may have and work with you to find an appropriate solution.

  • I’m teaching an online course. Can I give an in-person test ? How should I plan my syllabus and class schedule for this?

    Yes, but students who have no in-person courses AND who do not live on campus will not be required to take in-person tests. Faculty will need to provide alternative academic assessments for these students.

    Space will be available in the West Gym and the Events Center for this purpose during the following weeks:

    • Sept. 14-18
    • Oct. 5-9
    • Oct. 26-30

    In addition, space will be available Nov. 22-24, when classes are not in session. Two-hour time slots will be available.

    • Requests for in-person testing for the three weeks when classes are in session, Sept. 14-18, Oct. 5-9 and Oct. 26-30, can be made starting Aug. 3 in the B There room scheduling system {link: http://btheretest.binghamton.edu/portal/}.
    • Requests must be made at least a week and a half before the start of the exam week: Sept. 2 for the week of Sept. 14-18; Sept. 23 for the week of Oct. 5-9; and Oct. 14 for the week of Oct. 10-26.
    • Requests for the Nov. 22-24 dates, along with the online period of Dec. 8-10, will follow a process similar to final exam requests in previous semesters. The Course Building and Academic Space Management Office will coordinate with academic departments on courses needing testing times and locations during these dates.
  • My course has an in-person component but not all students are present at the same time. Can I request to use the large-capacity testing spaces for my course?

    Yes. You can, but students who have no in-person courses AND who do not live on campus will not be required to take in-person tests. Faculty will need to provide alternative academic assessments for these students.

    Space will be available in the West Gym and the Events Center for this purpose during the following weeks:

    • Sept. 14-18
    • Oct. 5-9
    • Oct. 26-30

    In addition, space for in-person testing will be available Nov. 22-24, when classes are not in session. Two-hour time slots will be available.

    • Requests for in-person testing for the three weeks when classes are in session, Sept. 14-18, Oct. 5-9 and Oct. 26-30, can be made starting Aug. 3 in the B There room scheduling system.
    • Requests must be made at least a week and a half before the start of the exam week: Sept. 2 for the week of Sept. 14-18; Sept. 23 for the week of Oct. 5-9; and Oct. 14 for the week of Oct. 10-26.
    • Requests for the Nov. 22-24 dates, along with the online period of Dec. 8-10, will follow a process similar to final exam requests in previous semesters. The Course Building and Academic Space Management Office will coordinate with academic departments on courses needing testing times and locations during these dates.
  • How do I request space for in-person testing?
    • Requests for in-person testing for the three weeks when classes are in session, Sept. 14-18, Oct. 5-9 and Oct. 26-30, can be made starting Aug. 3 in the B There room scheduling system.
    • Requests must be made at least a week and a half before the start of the exam week: Sept. 2 for the week of Sept. 14-18; Sept. 23 for the week of Oct. 5-9; and Oct. 14 for the week of Oct. 10-26.
    • Requests for the Nov. 22-24 dates, along with the online period of Dec. 8-10, will follow a process similar to final exam requests in previous semesters. The Course Building and Academic Space Management Office will coordinate with academic departments on courses needing testing times and locations during these dates.
    • Exam times and locations for the Nov. 22-24 and Dec. 8-10 exam periods will be posted to the final exam website.
    • Additional details will be posted on the Course Building and Academic Space Management website.
  • Will all students in my course be required to take in-person tests/exams if my course has them?

    It depends on the student’s schedule and where they live.

    • Students who are taking all their courses online and living off-campus WILL NOT be required to take in-person tests and exams. Faculty should make other arrangements for academic assessments for these students; these assessments need not be identical to the in-person tests.
    • Students who are taking all their classes online and living on campus WILL need to take in-person tests if instructors schedule them.
    • Students who have some courses in-person and some courses online WILL need to take in-person tests if instructors schedule them, regardless of where they live.
  • How will I know which students are required to take in-person tests and exams if my course has them?

    After the add/drop deadline, you will receive a list for your course indicating which students are required to take in-person tests/exams.

  • How do I inform students that I will be giving in-person tests for my online course?
    • Add this information to your syllabus so that students can plan accordingly. If you are teaching one of the few courses that typically gives evening tests to consolidate sections, include the test times in the syllabus as well, but be sure to wait until you have received confirmation of availability after submitting your schedule request in B There.
    • For all courses requesting space for tests/exams, make sure to request space in B There and have confirmation before you include dates in your syllabus.
    • Requests for tests/exams can be made in B There starting Aug 3.
  • What times can I select for my in-person tests?
    • Tests should be scheduled for your regular class period. Courses with multiple sections sometimes request evening time slots for tests and can use this option; students with conflicts will need to be accommodated.
    • Tests in the West Gym and Events Center must follow standard meet patterns during prime-time hours. Evening options will also be available. Requests for tests/exams can be made in B There  starting Aug 3.
    • Nov. 22-24, when no classes are in session, will be scheduled to accommodate requests across the three-day period, similar to our current final exam period scheduling process. If you plan to have a test during this time period, inform your students in the course syllabus.
  • How will tests during the online assessment period be scheduled?
    • Tests during Dec. 8-10, the online testing period, will follow a process similar to final exam requests in previous semesters.
    • The Course Building and Academic Space Management Office will coordinate with academic departments on courses needing testing times during these dates.
    • Exam times will be posted to the final exam website.
    • No in-person exams can be given during this time.
    • Additional details will be posted on the Course Building and Academic Space Management website.
  • Do tests for my online course need to be in-person or can they be online?

    You decide. Shorter, more frequent academic assessments are another approach to consider.

  • My course is scheduled on the A/B alternating week model. How should I plan my course?

    You’ll have a chance to be in person for half the weeks in the semester, so you might want to consider which parts of your course work best in person and plan for those weeks. Since there’s always a chance that we’ll need to go fully online again sometime in the fall, consider planning for the most important in-person activities to be early in the semester if that makes sense for your course. Staff in the Center for Learning and Teaching (CLT) will help you assess your course materials to see how to adapt things effectively for online delivery. Workshops and assistance will be available all summer. For more information: https://www.binghamton.edu/clt/ and you can email the CLT at clt@binghamton.edu.

  • I’ve heard about Bingflex and hybrid. What’s the difference between these and which one are we using?

    Binghamton is actually using both models, which are explained here:

    Bingflex is the term we’re using to describe the way many of our courses will be taught this fall; some students will be in the classroom and others will participate simultaneously online. Students are either in the online section or the in-person section and don’t switch back and forth. The only exceptions are if a student is ill or quarantined/isolated and should not go to class, or if an instructor is unable to teach in person for a period of time. All courses with the Student Rotation model will be Bingflex. Courses in the A/B model will be Bingflex if any student registered in the course requests to be fully online for the semester.

    For all courses that have an in-person section and a simultaneous online section, we will be using the Bingflex model.

    The Center for Learning and Teaching has resources to help instructors plan and deliver these courses: https://www.binghamton.edu/clt/

    (For additional background on Bingflex, see BingUNews.)

    Hybrid is a course that requires some in-person attendance and some online attendance. All courses in the A/B model are hybrid because they meet in person one week and online the next.

    Note: A/B courses will use the Bingflex model for the weeks when they’re in the classroom if one or more students registered for the course have chosen to be fully online for the semester, or if a student gets ill/quarantined during the semester.

  • I have an A/B alternating week course. Will all of my students be in the classroom when I’m on campus?

    Perhaps. If one or more students choose to be fully online for the semester or if one or more students is quarantined or ill, then not all students will be in the classroom and the course will be taught with the Bingflex model.

  • How can I teach a Bingflex course effectively?

    The most important thing will be to remember that you have some students in the room with you and others participating online. Discussions, small group breakouts and other parts of your class time can be adapted to create an effective learning experience for both groups of students. A classroom technology assistant (CTA) will be available to manage the technical side of things for you, so you won’t have to focus on that. The Center for Learning and Teaching is holding workshops and meeting with instructors all summer to help faculty develop effective Bingflex courses and teaching strategies. The key idea is to be intentional about learning activities for both your in-class students as well as those who are online. For more information: https://www.binghamton.edu/clt/ and you can email the CLT at clt@binghamton.edu.

  • Can someone help me coordinate the online part of my Bingflex course? Trying to manage the online part while teaching could be a challenge.

    Yes. A trained classroom technology assistant (CTA) will be assigned to your Bingflex course if you request one or if you are assigned one by your department. The CTA will set up the online session, make sure that your online students can see and hear, help share any presentations, monitor chat responses, set up breakout rooms and so forth. CTAs are not teaching assistants. They will not take attendance, hand out assignments or participate in classroom management. They help manage the technology for the online section so you can focus on teaching. Visit the CLT webpage: https://www.binghamton.edu/clt or email the CLT at clt@binghamton.edu.

  • Will any academic policies be modified for the fall 2020 semester?

    We plan to return to our normal academic policies for 2020-21, including our pass/fail and satisfactory/unsatisfactory policies as well as the course withdrawal and grade change option deadlines. Specific guidance for implementation may be modified in some cases (e.g., hearings for academic honesty cases).

  • What are the expectations for physical distancing and wearing a face covering for in-person classes?

    All participants in the instructional space (students, teaching or course technology assistants, instructors) are required to wear face coverings and maintain 6-foot spacing between people. Face coverings should fully cover the nose and mouth.

  • Will students know what the expectations are for wearing face coverings? What are the consequences for refusing to wear a face covering or not wearing it in the required manner?
    • All students (on-campus residents as well as off-campus residents) will need to accept a statement that outlines expectations for compliance with wearing face coverings and other public health and safety requirements.
    • Occasionally a student may forget to bring a face covering or lose it on the way to class; instructors can ask the student to leave the room and return when they’ve secured a face covering.
    • Refusal to wear a face covering in a classroom or instructional space is a health risk that inhibits or prevents safe course participation for the instructor and other students. In addition to campus-level consequences, instructors can implement course-level consequences for noncompliance.
    • Suggested language for inclusion in course syllabi will be made available to instructors to help address issues such as compliance and potential course-level consequences that could include lowering the student’s grade or removal from the course.
  • Is there anything new that I should include in my course syllabus for fall 2020?
    • If you are teaching an online course and giving in-person tests, indicate this on the syllabus.
    • If you will have an in-person test during the Nov. 22-24 testing period, inform students in the syllabus.
    • If you have a course with an in-person section and a fully online section, your learning objectives should be identical for all students. Your assignments or academic assessments should be comparable/equivalent for all students, but these assignments/assessments need not be identical. If there are differences, your syllabus should indicate the expectations for each section/delivery mode.
    • If your class has in-person meeting times, indicate whether there will be course-level consequences (e.g. lowered grades) for:
      • refusal to wear a face covering properly
      • ignoring the seating guidelines for 6-foot spacing between people
      • not following the designated calendar to be in person for Student Rotation or A/B alternating week models
      • (sample statements and text will be provided)
  • If courses with an in-person presence need to switch to fully remote delivery at some point in the semester, may I change my syllabus?

    Yes, with some conditions:

    • You can’t retroactively re-weight assignments for the course to give them a bigger or smaller impact on the overall course grade. 
    • If you choose to change future assignments or testing requirements, you should inform students within three days of the shift to remote instruction and the overall requirements should be comparable to those originally in the syllabus.
    • Assessment should continue to be aligned with the course learning outcomes after a shift to remote instruction, just as it was while the course met in person.

Teaching/academic calendar/technology

  • When will I learn my schedule?

    Schedules for continuing students who registered for classes this spring have not changed, although the mode of delivery may change. New students — first-year and transfer — will register for classes at orientation sessions in late June and July. The fall class schedule, as readjusted, became available June 18.

  • I don’t learn well in an online environment. Why should I return if all or most of my classes will be virtual?

    We are planning for much more than just courses on campus this fall, so your experience will include a variety of extracurricular activities on campus beyond your academics. And for many students, taking courses online and away from their peers is more challenging than being in an environment among other students who are also taking online courses. For in-person classes, we have purchased additional technology and are providing course assistants to assist faculty who are teaching in a HyFlex format that will allow students to take a course in person, synchronously online or asynchronously online. We'll have the infrastructure and support system in place to help you establish the discipline and skills to succeed.

  • Will all classes be live-streamed or recorded for students to take them online if they so choose?

    Most of our classes will be available online to students who do not wish to return to campus. Some classes, however, cannot be offered online and will only be in person. The schedule of classes is now available and indicates the format of the course.

  • Will all exams have to be in person?

    Some courses that are taught online will have in-person tests and exams and some will have online tests. Students who do not return to Binghamton and enroll in exclusively online classes will not have to come to campus to take exams. However, instructors will have the option to administer different exams to students taking them remotely or to employ proctoring services such as ProctorU to ensure academic integrity.

  • How will exams be handled when classes have both in-person and online participants?

    We will have some students who are taking a class online who are physically living on campus or in Binghamton. They will take exams in person, either at the Events Center or West Gym. Students who are taking classes online and are not living in the greater Binghamton community will take their exams online. Depending on the instructor's decision, these exams may be different than those given to students in person and they may require use of a proctoring software like ProctorU to ensure academic honesty for students taking the class online. The exams may be different that the in-person exams, but they will assess the same knowledge and be of similar difficulty as those given in person. We are being explicit with students at this point so that they can make an informed decision about how they take classes this fall.

  • What tools are available to help students academically?
  • What kind of access will there be to the libraries?

    In accordance with the Restarting Binghamton plan and its guiding principles, the Libraries plan to be open at the start of the fall 2020 semester. The Libraries' plan includes information on hours; study spaces; the Information Commons; Collections; Special Collections and the University Archives, reader services; research and instructional services; digital scholarship; and scholarly communications. The complete plan can be found online.

  • Why don’t you start the semester earlier so we don’t have to finish all of our classes online after Thanksgiving?

    The academic calendar balances public health, academic and summer teaching/research needs and best practices. Since a number of courses will be fully or partially online already, the transition to all-online after Thanksgiving will not be a big change for most students as the University continues efforts to adhere to public health guidance.

  • Why not simply go completely online as we did in the spring semester?

    Binghamton is a residential university, and we believe that an in-person experience offers students rich co-curricular as well as academic experiences. We have done extensive planning and believe that we can bring students, faculty and staff back to campus safely in August. Consequently, we are committed to resuming campus life while providing remote instruction opportunities to students who do not feel comfortable returning to campus.

  • How do you expect me to maintain my mental health without any breaks between the first day of classes and Thanksgiving?

    We understand that the fall semester will be much different than in the past, but our decisions to minimize the possibility of the coronavirus being brought onto campus has driven our decision to shorten the overall time of the fall semester. We remind students, faculty and staff of the many resources we have on campus to support positive mental health, including our University Counseling Center, CARE Team and recreational offerings for students, and our EAP program for faculty and staff. We encourage all members of the campus community to take advantage of these resources, eat well, get plenty of sleep and reach out for help if needed.

  • Why will there be classes on Yom Kippur, a major Jewish holiday?

    This, we know, will be an unusual semester, in part because we are eliminating all breaks from the academic calendar, including Yom Kippur. We did not make this decision lightly but made it with the understanding that any student or faculty member who wishes to observe Yom Kippur will not be penalized academically in any way. Faculty, as always concerning religious holidays, have been instructed to make accommodations for any individual students who miss class for religious reasons.

Code of Student Conduct

  • Will I have to sign a pledge before being allowed to live on campus?

    Binghamton University has put in place measures to meet public health standards established by state and local public health officials, the State University of New York (SUNY) and the State of New York as a result of COVID-19. Students choosing to live on campus agree to comply with all University and Residential Life policies and procedures established to support compliance with these public health standards through the Housing License and Housing License Addendum they sign.

    All students will agree to a Rights and Responsibilities document. The scope of that document is intended to apply to the on-campus behavior of off-campus students.

  • What happens if I do not follow the social distancing and other guidelines that I have agreed to?

    On-campus students who fail to comply with the terms of this addendum including violation of social distancing standards and quarantine/isolation requirements may be administratively removed from University housing. Such action will ordinarily be taken only after prior warning and repeated non-compliant behavior; however, the University reserves the right to remove a student on the basis of a single substantial and intentional violation of the COVID-19-related safety measures noted here and in other University official communications.

    Off-campus students who fail to comply with the terms of the Rights and Responsibilities document may also be sanctioned. Such action will ordinarily be taken only after prior warning and repeated non-compliant behavior. Sanctions may include loss of access to campus wireless.


International students

  • Can I stay in my home country and take all of my classes online?

    International students are academically eligible to enroll in 100% online courses, as long as they do so from outside the U.S. It should be noted that the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) issued updated guidance pertaining to international student enrollment for the fall 2020 academic semester, citing that it is no longer possible for students in F/J status to maintain their SEVIS record/non-immigrant status if they are outside the U.S. and enrolled in 100% online courses. International students who wish to maintain their non-immigrant status within the U.S. will need to enroll in a minimum of one course that counts toward their degree that involves in-person components. For additional information, contact International Student and Scholar Services at isss@binghamton.edu.

  • Will the rule about taking only one class online if I anticipate being present in the United States be relaxed again this fall like it was in the spring?

    On Monday, July 6, the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) issued updated guidance pertaining to international student enrollment for the fall 2020 academic semester, clarifying that international students who wish to remain in the US in F-1 or J-1 status will need to be enrolled in at least one in-person or hybrid (mixed in-person and remote/blended) course. For additional information, contact International Student and Scholar Services at isss@binghamton.edu.


College experience

  • I am an incoming student. How will you make this experience valuable for me?

    It is Binghamton University’s intent to provide the richest experience possible for all students, but particularly students who are new to campus. In addition to the many resources that will be available to students on campus — from recreational facilities to the Libraries and from student organizations to mental health supports — the University will be providing programming for students that will include both in-person and virtual non-academic events that safely follow social distancing guidelines in approved indoor and outdoor spaces. All events will be posted in B-Engaged.

  • Why should I live on campus when I won’t fully experience college life with so many restrictions?

    Returning students are already familiar with the hundreds of student organizations that regularly hold meetings and events, as well as University and department-sponsored functions. These opportunities will continue to be available, providing students with the myriad opportunities for engagement that provide a base for a robust college experience. Some events will be in person, others will be in hybrid or virtual formats. All events and programming will be announced in B-Engaged.

  • Can I take a gap year, or defer my first year until 2021?

    Binghamton University’s deferral policy can be found online. Deferrals are reviewed and granted on a case-by-case basis and, if granted, are for one year. The deadline to request a deferral for fall 2020 enrollment is Wednesday, July 1. To request a deferral, send an email to admit@binghamton.edu.

  • How will campus recreational activities and students organizations operate?

    Recreational services has prepared a full reopening plan for programs, outdoor pursuits and fitness that will comply with social distancing guidelines while providing services to students. As for student organizations, they will use B-Engaged to help monitor different events for compliance and ensure that virtual events are accessible. In addition, information is being gathered and plans developed to allow for some signature events.

  • What campus recreational facilities will be open?

    Campus Recreation is currently planning to reopen all areas of its program, including FitSpace, to the degree possible, taking into account all required local, SUNY and NYS safety measures and guidelines. There will likely be changes to hours of operation, max capacities and some operational policies and procedures, but our goal remains to offer students the opportunity to recreate safely on campus and in-person.

    We will also continue to offer virtual opportunities when possible and appropriate. As details are finalized, our website, as well as the University's  Restarting Binghamton website, will be updated. We encourage you to check these sites frequently.

  • What is the maximum number of students who can gather for group activities?

    The University will follow public health and New York state guidelines for the maximum number of individuals who can gather for group activities while maintaining social distancing guidelines. The Southern Tier, where Binghamton University is located, is currently in Phase Three of reopening. Gatherings of up to 25 people are allowed in Phase Three. However, we will follow guidance from the governor and SUNY based on what phase we are in as a region.


Health

  • How are individuals diagnosed with COVID-19?

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) people with COVID-19 have reported a wide range of symptoms ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

    • Fever or chills
    • Cough Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
    • Fatigue
    • Muscle or body aches
    • Headache
    • New loss of taste or smell
    • Sore throat
    • Congestion or runny nose
    • Nausea or vomiting
    • Diarrhea

    This list does not include all possible symptoms. Individuals may be diagnosed by a medical professional to have COVID-19, and will be considered a Person Under Investigation (PUI) and must be isolated. Their close contacts must be quarantined.

  • What is the difference between quarantine and isolation?

    Quarantine separates and restricts the movement of people who were exposed to COVID-19 before any symptoms might arise, to see if they become sick. Isolation separates people who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 from people who are not sick. Individuals who are isolated should:

    • Stay in their own room and not share a bathroom.
    • Only leave their room for medical appointments or emergencies. If one must leave their room, a mask should be worn.
    • Monitor for fever, cough or shortness of breath and report to a medical provider should those symptoms occur.
    • Wash hands frequently with soap and water for 20 seconds, or with hand sanitize that contains at least 60% alcohol.
    • Avoid sharing personal items like towels, dishes and bedding.
    • Clean all surfaces in rooms/bathrooms that are touched often, every day, with normal household sprays or wipes.
    • Cover coughs and sneezes with tissue or elbow.
    • Get rest and stay hydrated.
    • If a medical emergency occurs, call 911. Notify the dispatcher that you may have been exposed to COVID-19 and put on a mask before the ambulance arrives.

    Individuals who are quarantined should follow compulsory separation from others, including restriction of movement.

  • How are students who test positive for COVID-19 isolated?

    The University practices with respect to quarantine/isolation of students have been and will continue to be in consultation with the Broome County Health Department (BCHD).

    Returning home for quarantine/isolation is always an option for students if they are able and have private transportation.

    A residential hall has been reserved for on-campus residing students who need quarantine/isolation and who wish to remain on campus. This hall has two separate wings of three floors each where students will be assigned; ill students in the wing designated for isolation, those requiring quarantine in the other. There are two additional residential spaces on campus identified if surge capacity is needed.

    Off-campus students will be quarantined/isolated in their off-campus residences as per the guidance of the BCHD.

  • How are isolated students cared for?

    Students in on-campus quarantine/isolation spaces will be provided with a “care” kit that includes items such as a thermometer, Tylenol, masks, hand sanitizer, water pitcher, etc. This kit will also include educational materials on what students should do in quarantine/isolation; expectations of behavior in the designated spaces; instructions on meal ordering, laundry and trash removal; and resource and emergency numbers.

  • How do I know I haven't been in contact with someone who has a confirmed case of COVID-19?

    Binghamton University works with the Broome County Health Department (BCHD) — the lead agency in our county for COVID-19 — to support the health and wellness of anyone who is diagnosed with COVID-19. Individuals with the diagnosis are isolated and receive medical care, and the BCHD works with them to identify anyone they may have been in contact with. Those individuals will be notified by the BCHD of actions they should take to care for themselves.

  • What if a student is told to self-quarantine?

    In most cases, quarantined individuals will not be sick, but are being quarantined on the chance that they could become symptomatic and therefore, infect others. This is a strategy to reduce transmission. A student who has had a potential exposure to someone with COVID-19 may be told to self-quarantine. The student will be advised to go home for a period of 14 days post-exposure. If the student has elected to remain in the residence halls and cannot go home, the student will be quarantined on campus as space allows. 

    On-campus students who are quarantined should follow these nine steps. If you are an off-campus student who is quarantined, follow these nine steps

  • What should I do if I suspect someone I know has COVID-19?

    If the individual is a student, urge the person to contact the Decker Student Health Services Center (DSHSC) at 607-777-2221, or the person's medical provider. If the individual is an employee, urge the person to contact the person's medical provider. The individuals should call the DSHSC or their medical provider first to be screened and, based on responses to questions about symptoms, will be told next steps.

  • What should students who think they are sick do?

    Students who think they may have coronavirus should CALL THE DECKER STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES CENTER at 607-777-2221 to be screened before arriving at the facility.

    Students using an off-campus walk-in or urgent care facility should also call ahead, and faculty and staff should contact their healthcare provider by phone to make an appointment.

    All students wishing to receive medical care at Decker Student Health Services must call ahead for an appointment at 607-777-2221. Students who walk in for an appointment will be given the next available scheduled appointment, which may not be immediate.

  • Do I have to make an appointment to be seen at Decker Student Health Services Center?

    All care delivered at Decker Student Health Services Center is by appointment only.

    All students wishing to receive medical care at Decker Student Health Services must call ahead for an appointment at 607-777-2221. Students who walk in for an appointment will be given the next available scheduled appointment, which may not be immediate.

  • What counseling and support options are available to students?

    Both the CARE Team and the University Counseling Center (UCC) are available to all students who may need to speak with a case manager or counselor.

    To contact the CARE Team

    Appointments with case managers can be conducted through Zoom, email or phone:

    The CARE Team will provide same day phone-in services from 1-4 p.m. Monday through Friday at 607-777-2804. Students can call for an over-the-phone consultation with a case manager. 

    To contact the University Counseling Center (UCC)

    The UCC is currently using a telecounseling platform for services as described below.

    • Telecounseling services are being delivered through the Zoom platform whenever possible, but also include some telephone calls depending upon the technology available to students and/or staff. The UCC uses procedures and settings in Zoom to ensure full IT security of sessions.
    • Individual service options continue to evolve to meet the needs of our student community as we strive to adapt our services to the ever changing impact of the ongoing pandemic. Students may call the UCC front desk at 607-777-2772 to schedule a tele-meeting with a counselor to discuss your mental health concerns, some ways to cope and what follow-up options might be available given the UCC’s scope of service. We continue to provide referral assistance to students seeking to connect with off-campus counseling or psychiatry services. Students are encouraged to check secure messages (Health portal link) for previous communications from UCC staff.
    • A variety of pre-recorded as well as synchronous (live) workshops have been offered during the spring semester to provide students with support and resources regarding anxiety management, meditation practices, improving motivation and coping strategies specific to the challenges posed by the ongoing quarantine. Prerecorded workshops are available on our website and additional workshops are under development for the fall semester. If you are interested in a UCC staff member providing outreach presentations to a class or program, contact the front desk at 607-777-2772.
    • The UCC is currently reviewing options to resume group counseling in the fall semester in compliance with social distancing guidelines as well as recommended best practices. We will continue to post updates about this as information becomes available.
    • During the summer months, the UCC provides telecounseling services to Binghamton University students who are registered for summer classes. Current Binghamton University students who are residing in the Binghamton area during the summer and who are enrolled for the coming fall semester can also access services at the UCC within our scope of care by paying a one-time summer health services fee of $45.00. Call the front desk at 607-777-2772 to schedule a tele-triage consultation to discuss your therapy needs. Treatment recommendation(s) (e.g., brief counseling at the UCC, off-campus referral, psychiatry referral) will be discussed at the end of this consultation with consideration of the UCC's scope of services.
    • Staff will respond to urgent and emergent needs via same-day teleservice, with emergencies triaged to determine what is the appropriate level of care.
    • After-hours support remains available through the main counseling number at 607-777-2772 and press #2.
    • For assistance during regular hours and after-hours, call the UCC main number at 607-777-2772.
    • For emergency assistance call 911 or your local hospital, or see the Emergencies page on our website for other resources.
  • What resources are available to help me stay healthy, mentally and physically?

    A number of resources are available to students, faculty and staff to help them through this unusual spring semester — all available virtually.

    For faculty and staff:

    For students:


COVID-19 testing and contact tracing

  • What kind of testing will be done when I arrive on campus?

    The University is currently developing a testing protocol for when students arrive to move into their residence halls and it will be communicated when it is finalized.

  • Will I have to be tested throughout the semester?

    As the University continues to develop its testing protocol, it is expected that, after the initial screening upon a student’s arrival to move into a residence hall, surveillance testing (testing of people selected from the overall student population on campus) or diagnostic testing (testing of those who are exhibiting symptoms) may be put into place. However, it is currently difficult to predict what our final testing protocol would be, dependent upon testing supplies and other necessary resources.

  • What happens if someone tests positive for COVID-19?

    If someone tests positive, the University will work in consultation with the Broome County Health Department (BCHD) to isolate that individual until the individual's health has improved and they are no longer considered infectious. Returning home to recover will be the first option explored. For on-campus residing students who are unable to return home to recover, designated isolation spaces will be available on campus. For off-campus students, recommendations regarding isolation will be made in consultation with the BCHD considering the student's current off-campus living situation. Case investigators and contact tracers from the BCHD will work with students to identify and educate contacts in need of quarantine, and to provide support. 

  • Can I become a contact tracer?

    The University is initially working with the graduate programs in nursing, public health and perhaps social work to identify interested students who will act as the University's contact tracing team, aligned with the team from the Broome County Health Department (BCHD). These are not paid positions, but students will receive credit toward needed clinical hours through this assignment. At this time, we are not able to determine if we will need to recruit contact tracers from additional groups.


Travel


Parking and transportation


Off campus


Dining

  • How will dining on campus work?

    Campus dining facilities, both resident and retail, will adopt operating procedures that provide food in single-serving, ready-for-takeout packaging and will also institute increased sanitation at customer touch points. Dining facilities will be configured so diners will have only one entry point  and one exit point, with patrons queued in lines that adhere to social distancing guidelines and a greeter who will control the entry to the serving area. Some seating will be available consistent with social distancing guidelines. Menu selections will be offered as pre-packaged meals and self-service condiment, food and beverage stations have been discontinued. Touchless payment will be used at all locations and Plexiglass barriers have been installed at cashier stations. For additional details, visit the Binghamton University Dining Services website.

  • How will Dining Dollar rollovers work?

    If you will live in a Residence Hall on campus this fall (Mountainview, Hinman, CIW, Dickinson or Newing), your dining dollars will automatically roll over to your fall meal plan account. The default meal plan selection is Plan C, but if you have a large carryover balance, you may want to select a smaller meal plan for the upcoming semester. You will make this change using BU BRAIN.

    If you will be a commuter student this fall (including students living in Hillside and Susquehanna communities) and have:

    • A spending balance greater than $100, your meal plan dining dollars can be easily transferred, dollar for dollar, to the $25 Plan at no additional cost. This is a retail plan and does not include resident pricing. Details can be found on our website. You will need to contact the meal plan office at mealplans@budining.com or 607-777-6000 to choose this option.
    • A spending balance greater than $340 can be used to purchase a Commuter Semester Plan at no additional cost. You will need to contact the meal plan office at mealplans@budining.com or 607-777-6000 to choose this option.
    • A spending balance greater than $650 can be used to purchase a Commuter Annual Plan at no additional cost. You will need to contact the meal plan office at mealplans@budining.com or 607-777-6000 to choose this option.

    If you will be taking fall 2020 off, or attending only online classes and plan to return to campus for spring 2021:

    • And your dining dollars spending balance is greater than $100, the balance will be carried over to the meal plan you purchase for the spring 2021 semester.
    • If your balance is less than $100, it will not automatically be carried forward and will not be refunded. You may choose to enroll in the $25 Plan before the end of the fall 2020 semester, which will protect your carryover balance, and will be available for use through the end of the spring 2021 semester. If you return to live on campus for the spring 2021 semester, you will be required to enroll in a resident meal plan for that semester.

    If you will be graduating in fall 2020 and will be completing your final term remotely, we can offer you a refund of your dining dollar balance. Carryover dining dollars from any previous academic year are not eligible for refund.

    If you are transferring to another university or discontinuing your studies at Binghamton for more than one semester, you will not be eligible for a refund.


Employees

  • I have been told by the NYS Department of Health that I need to quarantine due to close contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19. What do I do?

    Contact Human Resources at 607-777-4939 to report this. State employees are eligible for one 14-day quarantine period without charge to leave credits in this situation.

  • I am planning to travel to a state that now requires that I quarantine for 14 days upon my return. What do I do?

    If you make the voluntary decision to travel to a state that requires you to self-quarantine for 14 days, you should expect that the 14-day quarantine period without charge to leave credits does NOT apply in this situation. You would be required to work remotely if feasible or charge your leave credits, other than your sick leave, for the 14-day quarantine period.

  • If I am working remotely do I need to fill out the daily health questionnaire?

    If you are on vacation or working remotely and will not physically visit the campus, you do not need to fill out the daily questionnaire. If you access your PODS account during this time, you will be required to click on the red button indicating that you are working remotely that day.

  • I'm stressed. Where can I find help on campus?

    The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) at Binghamton University is a resource available to all employees. As critical/essential employees, our New York state EAP coordinators are professionally trained to respond to critical incidents that impact the University’s community, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Employees can schedule a virtual appointment with EAP between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at 607-777-6655 or eap@binghamton.edu. Contact EAP for guidance, referrals or simply a confidential sounding board for anyone in distress.

    EAP offers the following information and resources for faculty and staff:

    • Information on coping with stress and managing social distancing during a pandemic
    • Childcare resources for essential workers
    • Financial relief and guidance
    • Online medical assistance
    • Relief available to workers under New York state law

    More information about these resources is available on the EAP website.

    New Yorkers can also call the COVID-19 Emotional Support Hotline at 1-844-863-9314 for mental health counseling.

    Remember, to schedule an appointment with EAP, call 607-777-6655 or email eap@binghamton.edu.

  • Will all regular state employees continue to be paid?

    All employees, whether considered critical or non-essential, and whether you have been given an alternative work assignment or not, will continue to be paid. A timesheet must be submitted and approved as detailed below to generate the payments. Until further notice:

    • Hourly employees who work a set schedule or less than a set schedule should complete their timesheets by the regular deadline (or have a designated timekeeper do so) reflecting their normal schedule, and be paid accordingly.
    • Hourly employees who receive supervisor approval to work more than their set schedule should be paid for actual hours worked.
    • Hourly employees without a recurring work schedule should submit their average number of hours worked in the previous two pay periods, as they normally do, by the HR deadlines to be paid.

    As a reminder, employees should be working from home/remotely to the greatest extent possible until they are notified by their supervisors otherwise.

    The University reminds all employees that the critical designation can be granted or removed as needed, depending upon the University’s needs.

  • I haven't been designated a critical employee. Does this mean I won't be?

    Agencies and authorities may change an employee’s designation as either essential or non-essential at any time and, as the operational needs of the response shift, the specific functions or locations may be modified accordingly at any time. The University will be re-assessing the current designations in a couple of weeks to assure it is still meeting the operating needs of the University.

  • I am a supervisor and I need to designate someone as critical. Can I do this now?

    Agencies and authorities may change an employee’s designation as either essential or non-essential at any time and, as the operational needs of the response shift, the specific functions or locations may be modified accordingly at any time.

  • I have been designated critical. Is remote work still an option?

    Those designated critical may be able to accomplish their work with a combination of remote work and physical work. You should discuss this potential option with your supervisor.

  • I might have symptoms of COVID-19. How will this affect my employment?

    Binghamton University has received the following guidance from the governor regarding employees experiencing symptoms associated with COVID-19:

    Any symptomatic employee should not report to work. As the number of suspected and confirmed cases of COVID-19 increases, all New York state employees must monitor themselves for possible symptoms, such as:

    • fever
    • cough
    • shortness of breath or
    • respiratory infection/distress

    Any employee experiencing symptoms associated with COVID-19 shall immediately report symptoms to their supervisor and the agency/authority’s human resources (HR) personnel. The supervisor and HR official will immediately direct the employee to leave work, if they are currently at work, or to stay home if they are not at work, and self-quarantine as a precaution.

    The supervisor shall request and record the latest contact information for the employee, including home or mobile telephone numbers, so that HR personnel can reach them for follow up information. If the employee is experiencing severe symptoms and requires urgent medical attention, the supervisor should call 911 and notify the dispatcher that the distressed employee may have COVID-19 symptoms, so that emergency medical service responders may use appropriate precautions.

    An employee exhibiting symptoms who is sent home/not allowed to work should not be required to charge sick leave accruals. They should be given an at-home work assignment. If an at-home assignment is not available, they remain in paid status without charge to accruals. Contact Human Resources at 607-777-4939 to report a case or for questions.

    Research Foundation employees are subject to the same procedures as above, except they are to contact their supervisors and the Research Foundation Human Resources Office at 607-777-4264 to report a case or for questions.

  • If an employee I supervise is quarantined or isolated, what do I do and what information can I share?

    An employee may choose to self-disclose medical information to anyone they wish, but that does not mean that supervisors/managers, Human Resources, University leadership or colleagues can then release that information to others, or discuss it with anyone.

    Guidance for supervisors:

    • If an employee will be absent from or unable to work, you may share an estimated time that they will return to work if one is known.
    • If employees ask about a colleague, remind them that we have a policy of assisting any employee who encounters difficulty in the workplace and that we respect employees’ privacy.
    • If an employee provides medical documentation to you, forward it to Human Resources. Medical documentation may be sent directly to Human Resources, who will then advise you, the supervisor, of the expected duration that the employee is expected to be out, without divulging any specific medical information.

    If you have specific questions, contact Human Resources at 607-777-4939.

    Be aware that any medical information is considered confidential by both union contracts and federal law, which has strict rules regarding what information can be released about an employee. While an employee may voluntarily share information about themselves, it is not information that a manager/supervisor can ask about or share. Contact HR at 607-777-4939 with any questions.

  • If a colleague is diagnosed with a confirmed case, how will I know if I'm at risk?

    If someone is diagnosed with a confirmed case of COVID-19, the Broome County Health Department, or the local health department for non-Broome County resident employees, is responsible for determining those individuals who may have been exposed and for contacting them. The employee may choose to self-disclose medical information to anyone, but that does not mean that supervisors/managers, Human Resources, University leadership or colleagues can then release that information to others, or discuss it with anyone.


Quarantine restrictions for out-of-state travelers

  • What states meet the criteria for required quarantine?

    Individuals are subject to the travel advisory if they have visited states identified as having a seven-day rolling average of over 10% of all COVID-19 tests producing a positive result, or the number of positive cases exceeding 10 per 100,000 residents. This list will be continually evaluated based on cases in each state over time. Refer to the following website for updates regarding impacted states: https://coronavirus.health.ny.gov/covid-19-travel-advisory

  • What does the travel advisory mean?

    The travel advisory requires all travelers from states that have a significant degree of community-wide spread of COVID-19 to quarantine when they enter New York for 14 days from the last day of travel in a designated state(s). The travel advisory requires all New Yorkers, as well as those visiting from out of state, to take personal responsibility for complying with the advisory in the best interest of public health and safety.

  • What does quarantine mean?

    If you are returning from travel to a designated state, and if such travel was for longer than the limited duration outlined above, you are required to quarantine when you enter New York for 14 days from the last day you were in a designated state(s), unless you are an essential worker or fall under another exception as determined by the Commissioner. The requirements to safely quarantine include:

    • The individual must not be in public or otherwise leave the quarters that they have identified as suitable.
    • The individual must be situated in separate quarters with a separate bathroom facility for each individual or family group. Access to a sink with soap, water, and paper towels is necessary. Cleaning supplies (e.g. household cleaning wipes, bleach) must be provided in any shared bathroom.
    • The individual must have a way to self-quarantine from household members as soon as fever or other symptoms develop, in a separate room(s) with a separate door. Given that an exposed person might become ill while sleeping, the exposed person must sleep in a separate bedroom from household members.
    • Food must be delivered to the person’s quarters.
    • Quarters must have a supply of face masks for individuals to put on if they become symptomatic.
    • Garbage must be bagged and left outside for routine pick up. Special handling is not required.
    • A system for temperature and symptom monitoring must be implemented to provide assessment in-place for the quarantined persons in their separate quarters.
    • Nearby medical facilities must be notified, if the individual begins to experience more than mild symptoms and may require medical assistance.
    • The quarters must be secure against unauthorized access.
  • If I arrive in New York from a state that has been added to the designated state list before the date it was added, but before 14 days have elapsed, do I have to quarantine?

    The travel advisory is not retroactive.However, travelers from those states are advised to self-monitor and get tested if they start to develop any symptoms, within the 14 day timeframe.

  • What does the travel advisory mean for essential workers?

    First, for these requirements to be applicable, Binghamton University essential workers must have traveled to a designated state for their job. If they travel to a designated state for their job, there are specific protocols for essential workers related to the travel advisory, to allow such workers to work upon their return to New York while also taking steps to mitigate any risk of transmission of COVID-19.

    In addition, all essential workers must continue to adhere to existing guidance, including guidance regarding return to work after a suspected or confirmed case of COVID-19 or after the employee had close or proximate contact with a person with COVID-19.

    Further, for all essential workers who have been in a designated state in the 14 days prior to arrival in New York state shall abide by quarantining and monitoring requirements as outlined on the New York State Department of Health website under the Exemptions for Essential Workers section.

  • If I am not an essential worker, can I travel to one of the designated states for vacation or to see family?

    Yes. However, upon your return you will be required to quarantine when you enter New York for 14 days from the last day you were in a designated state(s). In addition, pursuant to Executive Order 202.45, any New York state resident who voluntarily travels to a designated state for travel that was not taken as part of the person’s employment or at the direction of the person’s employer, will not be eligible for benefits under New York’s COVID-19 paid sick leave law.

  • I am only passing through designated states for less than 24 hours in my travels, do I need to quarantine?

    No. Individuals passing through a designated state for less than 24 hours, such as stopping at rest stops for vehicles, buses and/or trains; or lay-overs for air travel, bus travel or train travel, are not required to quarantine.

  • If I am student or faculty member arriving from a designated state, will I be given a quarantine order? Do I have to report myself to the local health department?

    The NYS Department of Health expects all travelers to comply and protect public health by adhering to the quarantine without receipt of an individual order. However, the NYS Department of Health and the local health departments reserve the right to issue a mandatory quarantine order, if needed. If you would like an order for purposes of applying for a sick leave benefit, contact the local health department where you are staying or where you reside.

    Pursuant to Executive Order 202.45, any New York State resident who voluntarily travels to a designated state for travel that was not taken as part of the person’s employment or at the direction of the person's employer will not be eligible for benefits under New York's COVID-19 paid sick leave law.

  • If I have a negative COVID-19 diagnostic test, does that mean I can come out of quarantine?

    No. Symptoms of COVID-19 can appear as late as 14 days after exposure. Therefore, a negative test cannot guarantee that you will not become sick. The full 14 days of quarantine are required.

  • How will my quarantine be enforced?

    The NYS Department of Health expects all travelers to comply and protect public health by adhering to the quarantine. However, the NYS Department of Health and the local health departments reserve the right to issue a mandatory quarantine order, if needed. Pursuant to Executive Order 205, anyone who violates a quarantine order, if needed. Pursuant to Executive Order 205, anyone who violates a quarantine order may be subject to a civil penalty of up to $10,000 or imprisonment up to 15 days per Public Health Law 229.

  • If I am driving from a designated state to New York, will law enforcement stop me because I have an out-of-state license plate?

    The Executive Order does not direct law enforcement to stop people solely due to an out-of-state license plate.


Campus services/operations

  • Campus Mail Services

    Campus Mail Services has resumed delivery. Departments that still want mail held at CMS after this date must email CMS at mailsvce@binghamton.edu. A reminder that summer window hours are noon to 2:50 p.m. The retail window is open from noon to 2:30 p.m. Those coming to the window will need to wear a mask to receive service.

  • Customer Service Center

    The Customer Service Center and monitor board remain in operation. CSC operates from 7 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Monday-Friday and can be reached at 607-777-2226 or pfcsc@binghamton.edu. The monitor board or Emergency Customer Service Center operates from 3:30 p.m.-7 a.m. Monday-Friday and 24 hours/day on weekends. The phone number is 607-777-2341. Emergency calls are responded to immediately. Non-emergency calls are referred to the CSC on the next business day.

  • Custodial services and cleaning

    Cleaning activities will be prioritized and focused on common areas to allow for attention to trash removal, cleaning restrooms, touch points and health-sensitive areas (locker rooms etc.). Unoccupied offices may not be cleaned on a regular basis and perishables should be disposed of in common-area trash cans. Cleaning activities such as floor finishing and carpet extraction will not be a priority.

  • Central Receiving

    Central Receiving has resumed package delivery across campus. Packages (with the exception of next-day or two-day air that will be delivered directly to recipients by the courier) will be received at Central Receiving and delivered to department/recipient locations. All attempts will be made to deliver packages within one to three business days. Direct delivery by couriers to one-drop locations (including ITC) is suspended. Contact Central Receiving at cntrlrec@binghamton.edu with any questions.

  • Plexiglass

    Physical Facilities will assist any department that has a need for plexiglass barriers. To begin the process, put in a service request with as much relevant information as possible including:

      • Building and room number
      • Application (desk-top, counter, etc.)
      • Required height and width of the plexi and whether a pass through slot is needed

    Physical Facilities will assign someone to visit the space to evaluate any potential code/ventilation issues etc. For common sizes and applications, the barriers will be ordered from a vendor, but in some cases, the barriers may have to be fabricated. At this point, departments are to provide a funding source. Departments are asked to notify Joe Turdo in the Business Office of the expenses incurred. If departments are comfortable in ordering barriers themselves, they may do so.

  • Repairs/maintenance

    Physical Facilities will prioritize repair and maintenance work orders based on life safety and critical needs. Non-maintenance work orders such as minor alterations will be given a lower priority, resulting in delays.

  • Event work orders
    Binghamton University has made the difficult decision to suspend external conferences and events through fall of 2020, so event work orders will not be processed until further notice, unless exempted. We look forward to a time we will again have the opportunity to welcome guests back to campus to provide premier conference and event services. You are encouraged to complete an interest form to inquire about dates beginning January 2021, which will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis in order of receipt, with priority given to returning clients.