Facilities, Equipment in the Watson School

The Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science at Binghamton University has developed an outstanding reputation in the areas of small scale systems, electronics packaging, information security and intelligent systems since its founding in 1983.

Spread across three buildings on campus - the Glenn G. Bartle Library tower, the Engineering Building, and the Innovative Technologies Complex (ITC) composed of the Biotechnology Building and the Engineering and Science Building - the Watson School houses many research laboratories that contain state-of-the-art laboratory equipment

Questions can be sent to Equipment and Operations Manager Building Administrator Chris Chase.

Laboratories and Core Facilities

Biomedical Engineering

Computer Science

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Mechanical Engineering

Systems Science & Industrial Engineering

Multidisciplinary Laboratories

Equipment List

 

Anechoic Chamber

Contact
Ron Miles
Distinguished Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
Associate Dean for Research, Watson School of Engineering & Applied Science
miles@binghamton.edu
607-777-4038

Location
ES B500

 

Directional Microphone Circuit

Anechoic Chamber Panorama

YouVisit Panoramic View

The 100 hertz cutoff anechoic chamber has outside dimensions of 20' (W) x 24' (L) x18' (H) and inside dimensions of 13'8"(W) x 17'8" (L) x 11'4" (H). It includes wedges having anechoic properties from 100 hertz to 30,000 hertz and 4" floor panels that sit on a 4" 3-hertz spring isolation system.

There is a 3/32" diameter stainless steel spring tensioned cable floor and support framework with a raised grating floor and an expanded metal entrance ramp. The chamber has been tested in pure tones from 100 hertz to 16,000 hertz and in 1/3 octaves from 100 hertz to 30,000 hertz.

There is a ceiling-mounted, computer-controlled robotic microphone positioning system with 5-axis motion: X, Y, Z, Phi (vertical-plane rotation) and Theta (horizontal-plane rotation) and a data acquisition system and positional system control with 10 input channels with a 160dB dynamic range and DC - 50kHz frequency range per channel and 2 output (source) channels.

 

Atomic layer deposition system

   

Contact
Shawn Wagoner
Nanofabrication Facility Director
swagoner@binghamton.edu
607-777-7200

Location
ES B209

Description
One of the two standard platforms (ALD150LE, ALD150LX), the system is designed for perpendicular flow with a centrally-pumped chamber. They facilitate thermal and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition techniques.

 

Cellular and Microbial Culturing Suite

Contact
Peter Huang
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
phuang@binghamton.edu
607-777-2071

Location
ES B100

Description
This suite of equipment provides the thermofluids group with the capability to culture human cells and microorganisms. The class II biosafety cabinet and refrigerated centrifuge provides a means to manipulate and condition cultured cells and microorganisms in controlled, sterile environments. The humidity-controlled incubator and orbital shaker incubator provide suitable environments for cell growth. The -80°C deep freezer and the cryopreservation freezer, on the other hand, provide proper long-term storage of collected cell strains under investigations. The suite will be particularly helpful as the thermofluids group increases research efforts into cancer and microorganisms in the micro- and nanofluidic applications.

 

Conductive Force Nanoprobe

  

Contact
Guangwen Zhou
AssistantProfessor, Mechanical Engineering Department
gzhou@binghamton.edu
607-777-5084

Location
BIO 1305

Description
The NanoFactory Instruments System SA2500. NE is an in-situ conductive force nano-probing system with a side entry double tilt TEM-NanoIndenter holder. The force probe sensor is integrated with a patented 3 dimensional approach mechanism providing a wide-range of sample/probe motions with sub-nanometer resolution. TEM imaging accurately positions the probe at the region of interest. The sensor/probe measures force and electric currents at specific locations on the specimen. This feature enables the in-situ studies of the electrical and mechanical properties of nanoscale structures.

 

Critical point dryer

   Critical Point Dryer 

Contact
Shawn Wagoner
Nanofabrication Facility Director
swagoner@binghamton.edu
607-777-7200

Location
ES B209

Description

The dryer is used to increase yield and uniformity of MEMS devices. Liquid carbon dioxide is the transitional fluid used to process your delicate MEMS. The tousimis Samdri line of Supercritical Point Drying tools used for the MEMS CO2 dry release after wet etching is a most beneficial anti-stiction tool for the MEMS fab.

 

Digital Signal Processing System

 

Engineering and Science Building Rotunda

Digital Signal Processing System

Contact
Stephen Zahorian
Professor and Chair, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
zahorian@binghamton.edu
607-777-4846

Location
ES 2337

Description
The equipment in this lab allows for those working in signal processing to develop and test DSP (Digital Signal Processing) algorithms with a specialized signal rather than only as a Matlab simulation. This allows real-time demonstrations to be performed for audio frequency (or lower) signals. For example, real-time systems for automatic speech recognition can be developed  and tested. Three faculty in Electrical and Computer Engineering currently focus on signal processing research—Stephen Zahorian, Mark Fowler, and Edward Li.   Some of the equipment in this lab has been supplied  by Texas Instruments through their university grants program.


E-beam evaporator

   

Contact
Shawn Wagoner
Nanofabrication Facility Director
swagoner@binghamton.edu
607-777-7200

Location
ES B209

Description
AJA International ATC-E (E-Beam Evaporation) is a highly evolved HV and UHV coating tool designed for R&D scale thin film deposition. These systems feature load-locks, ion milling / ion assist sources, heated/cooled substrate holders, QCM deposition control / computer control, and the unique water cooled, 300 Amp thermal deposition sources.

 

Electrochemistry System

 

Engineering and Science Building Rotunda

Electrochemistry System

Contact
Changhong Ke
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
cke@binghamton.edu
607-777-4782

Location
ES B203

Description
The electrochemistry system is used to investigate the formation of electrochemically adsorbed layers, electrodeposition and electroresolution of metals, electrocorrosion and electroregeneration, oxidation of different metals and other conducting materials, electrically active nanocenters, ions and molecules, mass transfer, etc.  

The Potentiometry module is used to directly measure the topography and the corresponding two-dimensional potential distribution resulting from an applied voltage to a semiconductor device. The conductive atomic-force microscopy (AFM) module is a powerful current sensing technique for characterizing conductivity variations in resistive samples.

It allows current measurements in the range of hundreds of femtoamps to nearly a microamp. The conductive AFM can simultaneously map the topography and current distribution of a sample.

 

EOS m290

 

Contact
Ryan Willing
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
rwilling@binghamton.edu
(607) 777-5038

Location
ES 1500

Description

With a building volume of 250 x 250 x 325 mm, the EOS M 290 allows a fast, flexible and cost-effective production of metal parts directly from CAD data.

An intuitive user interface, the intelligent software concept with a combination of open and standardized parameter sets and the improved filter system are specially designed for the industrial production.

 

General Purpose Glovebox

   

Contact
Howard Wang
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
wangh@binghamton.edu
607-777-3743

Location
ES B217

Description
The glove box is a general purpose research tool that offers a controlled environment for inert gas.

 

ICP 180 DRIE system for deep etching

    Deep Etching

Contact
Shawn Wagoner
Nanofabrication Facility Director
swagoner@binghamton.edu
607-777-7200

Location
ES B209

Description

The system has High etch rates are achieved by high ion density (>1011 cm3) and high radical density. There is Control over selectivity and damage is achieved by low ion energy. The separate RF and ICP generators provide separate control over ion energy and ion density, enabling high process flexibility.

 

Image Correlation System

  Anechoic Chamber at Binghamton University's Engineering and Science Building

Contact
S.B. Park
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
sbpark@binghamton.edu
607-777-3415

Location
ES 1201

Description
The Aramis 3D Digital Image Correlation System enables characterization deformation of objects under extreme hygro-thermo-mechanical loading. This equipment enhances electronics and MEMS packing research especially in validating numerical simulations and understanding material behavior.

 

Infrared Spectrometer

 

Infrared Spectrometer

Infrared Spectra 1

Contact
Junghyun Cho
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
jcho@binghamton.edu
607-777-2897

Location
ES B215

Description

The Perkin Elmer Spectrum 100R Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer identifies types of chemical bonds of the phases that constitute synthesized materials, semiconductors and novel materials (liquid or solid). The infrared (IR) spectrum of a sample is recorded by passing a beam of IR light through the sample. Examination of the transmitted or reflected light reveals how much energy is absorbed at each wavelength. From a transmittance or absorbance spectrum produced, one can perform analysis of these absorption characteristics that reveals details about the molecular structure of the sample. This system also has accessories such as Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR), MCT detector, and various angles of spec reflectance accessories.

 

Intensified TIRF Microscope

  Inverted Epi-fluorescent Microscope at Binghamton University's Engineering and Science Building

Contact
Peter Huang
Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering
phuang@binghamton.edu
607-777-2071

Location
BI2513

Description
This state-of-the-art imaging microscope system is the workhorse of experimental measurements in fluidic, colloidal, thermal, molecular and cellular research. The wide range of physical length scale (from mesoscale to molecular) and illumination means (Differential Interference Contrast, Total Internal Reflection, Multi-Color Fluorescence, Transillumination, Laser) provided by the microscope enables research in micro/nanofluidics, biofluidics, and biomolecule-fluidic interface interactions. In addition, the environment-controlled chamber enables prolonged measurements on temperature and humidity-sensitive specimen such as biological cells and molecules. A highly sensitive image intensifier is incorporated into the imaging arm of the microscope system to detect single photon events in the nanoscale. The whole imaging microscope is supported by a vibration-isolation optical table and housed in a dedicated dark room inside the Transport Science Core to ensure best imaging quality.

 

Laser Vibrometer

Laser Vibrometer  

Contact
Ron Miles
Distinguished Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
Associate Dean for Research, Watson School of Engineering & Applied Science
miles@binghamton.edu
607-777-4038

Location
ES B500

Description
The Polytec MSA-500 laser vibrometer is an integrated microscope and scanning system for measuring out-of-plane vibrations of microstructures. It is capable of measuring the motion of microstructures that are a mere 1 um across, roughly 1/10 the size of the smallest structures currently measured using our existing PSV-300 laser vibrometer. The MSA-500 is also capable of stroboscopic video measurement of in-plane motion for frequencies up to 1 MHz.

 

MakerBot Replicator 2X

 

Contact
Ryan Willing
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
rwilling@binghamton.edu
(607) 777-5038

Location
ES 1500

Description

Add a new level of creativity to your 3D designs with two interlaced colors that you can print through precisely aligned dual nozzles—without swapping or pausing.

Make snaps, living hinges, threaded objects and more with a ductile, petroleum thermoplastic with elastic deformation properties. Control heating and cooling better with a superflat heated aluminum build plate and a clear, six-sided, draft-blocking enclosure that helps prevent uneven cooling, shrinking and cracking.

 

Micro/Nano Biofluidics Sample Preparation and Inspection Suite

  Micro/Nanofluidic Interface Characterization Suite

Contact
Tim Singler
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
singler@binghamton.edu
607-777-4330

Location
ES B208

Description
This suite of equipment precisely characterizes the thermophysical properties of fluids and the interfacial properties of liquid-solid, liquid-liquid and liquid-gas interfaces. It builds on existing capabilities afforded by such instruments as the Bausch & Lomb optical refractometer, TA Instruments rheometer, and others. The Kruss K100MK2 process tensiometer measures the surface and interfacial tension of liquids (as functions of temperature and concentration), dynamic and static contact angles, liquid and solid densities and critical micelle concentrations. The Kruss KBP100 tensiometer is specifically designed to measure the dynamic surface tension as a function of the surface age and provides information about wetting and drop formation in short timescale processes. This instrument enables the determination of the adsorption and diffusion coefficients for a particular interface. The two tensiometers significantly enhance our capabilities to characterize the physicochemical properties of pure liquids, solutions and colloidal dispersions, capabilities that will positively impact our research efforts in the synthesis and deposition of functional materials, printed electronics, solar cells, microfluidic sensing and biofluidics, all of involve interfaces in a critical way.

 

Micro/Nano Biofluidics Inspection Suite

  Micro/Nano/Biofluidics Sample Preparation and Inspection Suite

Contact
Tim Singler
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
singler@binghamton.edu
607-777-4330

Location
ES B100

Description
This suite of equipment precisely prepares fluidic, colloidal, molecular and cellular samples for high quality experimental investigations.  A microcentrifuge, a temperature-controlled ultrasonic bath and a microfluidic mixer manipulate micro/nanoscale suspension and solutions through concentrating, diluting and mixing. In addition, special gas and humidity-controlled environment can be maintained inside a chemical glove box accessorized with a vacuum pump. An upright microscope equipped with a CCD camera is used to visually inspect and quantify fabricated micro/nanofluidic devices and the prepared samples on top of a vibration-isolation optical table.

 

MicroPG101 pattern generation system

    Pattern Generation System

Contact
Shawn Wagoner
Nanofabrication Facility Director
swagoner@binghamton.edu
607-777-7200

Location
ES B209

Description

The μPG 101 is an extremely economical and easy to use micro pattern generator for direct writing applications and low volume mask making. The system can be used for applications such as MEMS, Bio MEMS, Integrated Optics, Micro Fluidics or any other application that requires high precision, high-resolution microstructures.

The μPG 101 offers a very small footprint of only 60 x 75 cm² featuring a compact design with all electronic components integrated into the system. A personal computer is used for system control. The Windows based control software makes it easy for users to convert the designs, perform a manual or automatic alignment and start the exposure.

 

MJB-4 contact aligner

SUSS MJB-4 Contact Aligner  

Contact
Shawn Wagoner
Nanofabrication Facility Director
swagoner@binghamton.edu
607-777-7200

Location
ES B209

Description

Easy to use and compact in size the SUSS MicroTec MJB4 represents the perfect system for laboratories and small volume production. As an inexpensive photolithography solution the MJB4 has set industry standards specifically for processing of small substrates and pieces up to 100mm. Equipped with a reliable, high precision alignment and high resolution printing capability in the submicron range the MJB4 demonstrates a performance unsurpassed by any comparable machine.

 

Nanoindenter

 

Nanoindenter

Nanoindenter

 

Contact
Junghyun Cho
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
jcho@binghamton.edu
607-777-2897

Location
ES B202

Description
Combining a depth sensing indentation (nanoindentation) and atomic force microscope (AFM) permit the observation and characterization of various materials, particularly for thin films and localized, small-scale structures ranging from µm to nm. Our integrated nanoindentation system (TriboIndenter, Hysitron, Inc., Minneapolis, MN) consists of a nanoindenter and AFM along with other accessories such as a lateral force option, a dynamic load capability, a feedback control, an automatic translation stage for specimen, a heating/cooling stage, and an optical microscope.

This system measures the indentation response during the sequence of loading and unloading when the sharp tip interacts with the surface of the material (i.e., indentation load vs. displacement). It has a capability to characterize both elastic and plastic properties including: i) mechanical performance (hardness, elastic modulus, creep, stress relaxation) and contact problems (wear, coefficient of friction); ii) time-dependent deformation (viscoelasticity) of polymers via dynamic testing; iii) in-situ mechanical behavior at temperatures ranging from -10˚C to 200˚C; iv) thin film properties, thickness measurement, and film adhesion.

 

Objet 30Pro

 

Contact
Ryan Willing
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
rwilling@binghamton.edu
(607) 777-5038

Location
ES 1500

Description

The Objet30 Pro combines the accuracy and versatility of a high-end rapid prototyping machine with the small footprint of a desktop 3D printer.

Powered by PolyJet technology, it offers eight different 3D printing materials, among them clear, high-temperature and simulated polypropylene, and features the industry's best print resolution so you get smooth surfaces, small moving parts and thin walls. With a roomy tray size of 300 × 200 × 150 mm (11.81 × 7.87 × 5.9 in.), Objet30 Pro is ideal for prototyping consumer goods, consumer electronics, medical devices and more. The Objet30 Pro gives you the power to create realistic models with specialized properties quickly and easily in-house.

 

Optical Characterization System

Contact
Vladimir Nikulin
Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
vnikulin@binghamton.edu
607-777-6956

Location
ES B205, B215

Description
Specialized characterization tools are the major research equipment our researchers use in the area of free space and semiconductor optics. The spectrum analyzer characterizes the frequency response of devices and when coupled with a sweep oscillator, characterizes frequency to high frequencies greater than 20GHz. The high speed oscilloscope provides high speed time-domain pulse information and allows pictures of pulse shapes in 1ns scale used for semiconductor lasers, remote sensing or high-speed communication. The optical spectrum analyzer, an essential tool, allows measurement of power versus wavelength. The tunable laser characterizes wavelength dependent properties of detectors and modulators and allows pulse light source generation. The beam analysis system allows power/energy and the profile of beam shape measurements. The liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM) is used for adaptive optics experiments and in nano-scale measurements.

 

PECVD system for deposition of SiO2

    Oxford Plasmalab System 100

Contact
Shawn Wagoner
Nanofabrication Facility Director
swagoner@binghamton.edu
607-777-7200

Location
ES B209

Description
NANO-MASTER, Inc. PECVD systems are capable of depositing high quality SiO2, Si3N4, or DLC films on up to 8" diameter substrate sizes. To generate plasma, it uses RF shower head electrode or Hollow Cathode RF plasma source with Fractal Gas Distribution. The platen can be biased with RF or Pulsed DC and it is heated resistively or cooled with chilled water circulation. The chamber is evacuated to low 10-7 torr pressure using 250 l/sec turbomolecular pump backed with 3.5 cfm mechanical pump. Standard unit comes with one inert gas, three reactive gas lines and four mass flow controllers. The planar Hollow Cathode Plasma source with its unique gas distribution system makes it possible to meet wide range of requirements such as plasma density, uniformity and separate activation of reactive species to cover the broadest possible deposition parameters.

 

Plasma Etcher

   Plasma Etcher

Contact
Tim Singler
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
singler@binghamton.edu
607-777-4330

Location
ES B100

Description
The Plasma surface treatment system is based on the PlasmaEtch Model RIE200 system which includes two gas connections (manipulated by an integrated Mass Flow Controller), a rectangular stainless steel chamber with hinged door, and a 13.56 MHz RF generator with reactive ions etching (RIE) configuration. The system is customized for use with corrosive gases.The low pressure plasma surface treatment system cleans, activates, etches and polymerizes surfaces of substrates.

For general cleaning applications, ion bombardment cleans surfaces physically and chemically by vaporizing surface contaminants. Plastic surfaces are activated by forming reactive radicals which lead to good adhesion between the activated surface and any subsequently coated layer. By using a reactive process gas, the generated plasma is able to etch and structure the treated surfaces. By introducing a single and/or multiple monomer gases into the vacuum chamber, the resulting plasma-induced polymerization is able to realize deposition of hydrophobic, hydrophilic and other functional diffusion barrier layers on treated sample surfaces.

 

Portable Laser Vibrometer

 Portable Laser Vibrometer  

Contact
Mohammad Younis
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
myounis@binghamton.edu
607-777-4983

Location
ES B225

Description
The portable and flexible Polytech laser doppler vibrometer enables the measurement of vibrations of wide scale of devices starting from small to very large scales. The main features that the machine offers are the portability and flexibility advantages. It can be carried in various places and mounted in vertical, horizontal, and any other orientation and position, as the applications demand. This is essential for many of the research activities of the mechanical engineering faculty, such as the broad area of dynamic and vibrations with applications in sensors, microphones, electronic packaging, and other systems.  Such flexibility is not available in the other more sophisticated laser doppler vibrometers, which have lenses like microscopes that limit the size and orientation of the objects they can detect.

 

Probe Station with LCR Meter

 

 Probe Station with LCR Meter

Probe Station 2.jpg

Probe Station 3

Probe Station

Contact
Jungyun Cho
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
jcho@binghamton.edu
607-777-2897

Location
ES B204

Description
Various electrical performance evaluations including frequency response are performed in this probe station. The system is comprised of three main pieces: probe station (Signatone), LCR meter (Agilent E4980A), and data acquisition computer/software that can calculate and display dielectric parameters.

The probe station is also equipped with an impedance analyzer and semiconductor analyzer.

This tool is also measures electrical characteristic responses as a function of composition and chemical variations of materials.

 

Rapid thermal processing system

   Rapid Thermal Processing System 

Contact
Shawn Wagoner
Nanofabrication Facility Director
swagoner@binghamton.edu
607-777-7200

Location
ES B209

Description

The RTP-600S system is an advanced benchtop rapid thermal processing system with multi-gas capabilities. The system processes wafers up to 6" in diameter. The integrated process control system features real-time graphics, recipe management, data acquisition and display and has a comprehensive diagnostic function.

 

Reactive ion etcher

   NRE-4000 

Contact
Shawn Wagoner
Nanofabrication Facility Director
swagoner@binghamton.edu
607-777-7200

Location
ES B209

Description

The NRE-4000 is a stand alone Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) system with shower-head gas distribution and water cooled RF platen. It has a stainless steel cabinet and a 13" cylindrical Aluminum chamber that opens from top for wafer loading. Chamber has two ports, one with a 2" window the other with a blank off for end point detection and for other diagnostic. It can accept up to 12" (300 mm) wafers. Chamber is extremely clean in design and reaches 10-6 Torr or lower base pressure depending on the pumping package. It can be operated in the pressure range of 20 mTorr to 8 Torr. Pumping package consists of a throttle valve, 250 l/sec corrosive turbomolecular pump, sieve filter, and a 10cfm mechanical pump with fomblin oil. The RF power is provided by 600 W 13.5 MHz power supply, and auto-tuner. The self DC bias is continuously monitored and reaches as high as -500 V which is important for anisotropic etching. The system is completely automated and is PC controlled. The real time system pressure and DC bias is displayed in graphic format while flow and power is displayed in alpha numeric format. Four levels of authorization Auto, Engineering, Process and Maintenance prevents unauthorized use of the system while giving maximum flexibility to user for setting up recipes in Process mode and running in Auto mode with high reproducibility.

 

Resists spinners and developers

   Resists spinners and developers 

Contact
Shawn Wagoner
Nanofabrication Facility Director
swagoner@binghamton.edu
607-777-7200

Location
ES B209

Description

Engineered by Brewer Science to be compatible with processing for an array of applications. The universal design and ingenuity allows the semiconductor processing equipment to accommodate any market and evolving technology.

 

Shock and Vibration Data Acquisition System

Contact
James Pitarresi
Distinguished Teaching Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
jmp@binghamton.edu
607-777-4747

Location
ES B400

Description

The Shock and Vibration DAQ provides expanded capability to acquire vibration-based signals for shock and vibration experimental research programs. The LDS-830 shaker's power amplifier provides full vibration testing capabilities including a thermal chamber for high and low temp in combination with vibration... Shock pulse is programmable to represent a wide range of realistic mechanical shock conditions.

 

Size Analyzer

 

 Zetasizer Nano-ZS from Malvern Instruments

Size Analyzer 3

Size Analyzer 4

Size Analyzer 2

Contact
Junghyun Cho
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
jcho@binghamton.edu
607-777-2897

Location
ES B201


Description
The Zetasizer Nano-ZS uses dynamic light scattering (DLS) to measure size, molecular weight, and zeta potential of dispersed particles and molecules in solution. The temperature range covered is 2 to 90°C. DLS is a noninvasive technique that measures a large population of particles in a very short time period, with no manipulation of the surrounding medium.

This equipment can measure particle sizes as small as 0.6 nm and as large as 6 μm, across a wide range of sample concentrations. Because of the sensitivity to trace amounts of aggregates and the ability to resolve multiple particle sizes, DLS is ideally suited for colloidal sciences and macromolecular applications that necessitate low sample concentration and volume.

It is a benchtop system with 4 mW He-Ne laser (633 nm).

 

Sputter system with 5 confocal sputter sources

   Sputter System 

Contact
Shawn Wagoner
Nanofabrication Facility Director
swagoner@binghamton.edu
607-777-7200

Location
ES B209

Description

AJA International ATC Orion Series Sputtering Systems are compact versions of the popular ATC Flagship Series physical vapor deposition tools designed to deliver maximum performance for limited budgets. These HV and UHV systems inherit many design features and common parts from the highly evolved ATC sputtering tools.

 

Stratasys uPrint SE Plus

 

Contact
Ryan Willing
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
rwilling@binghamton.edu
(607) 777-5038

Location
ES 1500

Description

The uPrint SE Plus 3D printer uses FDM Technology to build in real ABSplus thermoplastic, creating models and functional prototypes that are durable, stable and pinpoint accurate. With nine colors to choose from, you can create realistic prototypes and marketing models. Use them to evaluate form, fit and function in everything from ergonomics to manufacturing processes — right from your desktop. Two layer thicknesses let you choose whether to print your model 30 percent faster or at a finer resolution. Optional dual material bays mean more uninterrupted print time, so you can maximize productivity even when you're not in the office.

 

Tube Furnace

  Tube Furnace 

Contact
Howard Wang
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
wangh@binghamton.edu
607-777-3743

Location
ES B217

Description
This high temperature tube furnace enables high temperature processes up to 1800 C.

 

 

UHF Vibrometer

   UHF Vibrometer

Contact
Mohammad Younis
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
myounis@binghamton.edu
607-777-4983

Location
ES B225

Description
The Polytech ultra-sensitive scanning ultra-high frequency vibrometer provides the unique capability of studying the motion aspects of very small structures, such as nanostructures and carbon nanotubes.  

The vibrometer enables the detection of the vibration features and motion of sub‐micro and nanostructures, which typically have very high frequencies. These include carbon nano tubes and graphene sheets.

 

UV/Visible/NIR Spectrophotometer

  

 UV/Vis/NIR Spectrometer

UV VIS Spectra

Contact
Junghyun Cho
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
jcho@binghamton.edu
607-777-2897

Location
ES B215

Description
The Perkin Elmer Lamda 950 UV/Vis/NIR spectrophotometer provides high absorbance scanning for the samples such as lenses, optical filters, polarization materials, organic materials, and inorganic materials.  

These samples often need to be measured across the whole ultraviolet (UV), visible light (Vis), and near infrared (NIR) ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum (from 175-3300nm).

This equipment is also be used in the quantitative determination of solutions of metal ions and organic compounds. This system is useful for characterization of materials including thin film, sensor, and device fabrication that are important in electronic packaging, flexible electronics, MEMS, and photovoltaics.

This system has a 150-mm integrating sphere. In particular, it will provide a nice complementary characterization tool, along with our existing fourier transform infrared spectrometer. 

 

Vacuum Sputter Tool

 

Vacuum Sputtering System

Vacuum Sputtering System

Vacuum Sputter Tool 1

Vacuum Sputter Tool 4

Contact
Junghyun Cho
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
cho@binghamton.edu
607-777-2897

Location
ES B201

Description
The Denton Desktop Pro sputter tool provides ceramic and metal thin film deposition on almost any substrate (Si, polymer, organic, glass, ceramic, or metal) and is equipped with one DC power supply and one RF power supply.

This equipment is used for research activities and in undergraduate and graduate instructional labs. In addition, the sputtering system builds on device research (e.g., electronic packaging, flexible electronics, photovoltaics).

Features of this tool include a protective/barrier layer for environmental sensitive components, top electrodes to test electrical performance of the devices, and patterned structures for nanotechnology.

 

X-ray Diffractometer

 

Xray Diffractometer

X-ray Diffractometer

X-RAY Diffract 1

X-RAY Diffract 2

Contact
Howard Wang
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department
wangh@binghamton.edu
607-777-3743

Location
ES B215

Description
The x-ray diffractometer (XRD) enables general purpose and routine material structure characterization using a position sensitive detector that offers high quality diffraction measurements at very high speeds.

Relevant research topics include nanotechnology, materials, functional organic materials, solar cell, biosensors and biomedical, MEMS, microfluidic devices and batteries.

Associated Faculty
Paul Chiarot, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, pchiarot@binghamton.edu
Peter Huang, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, phuang@binghamton.edu
Bruce Murray, Professor, Mechanical Engineering, bmurray@binghamton.edu

Last Updated: 1/19/16