News and Lifelong Learning: Alumni Authors

Please note this web page covers books published within the last few years and in no way constitutes a complete listing of Binghamton University alumni authors. If you're an author and would like to have your book listed on this page, or know of an alumni author who should appear on this list, contact us at alumni@binghamton.edu.

  • Stacey Agin Murray '89 is the author of The Organized Bride's Thank You Note Handbook (CreateSpace, 2015). The handbook offers brides and grooms organizing tips, systems, and 101 sample thank you notes to help them manage and organize their words of 'thanks' as the gifts start pouring in.
  • Douglas Ambrose, PhD '91 wrote Your Obedient Servant: The Letters of Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr (Fenimore Art Museum, 2019), based on the museum's documents pertaining to the life and death of Alexander Hamilton.
  • Dolores Andral '94 and Vladimir Andral '95 published the picture book Prissy On The Moon (Laurel View Press, 2014), which tells the story of a child whose imagination leads to an exciting lunar journey.
  • Jonathan D. Anzalone, MA '03 wrote Battles of the North Country: Wilderness Politics and Recreational Development in the Adirondack State Park, 1920-1980 (University of Massachusetts Press, 2018). He is a lecturer and assistant director at the Center for News Literacy in the School of Journalism at Stony Brook University. 
  • Dora Apel '74 published Beautiful Terrible Ruins: Detroit and the Anxiety of Decline (Rutgers University Press, 2015). Apel, an art historian, explores a variety of images of this troubled city, showing the underlying pessimistic narratives that all hope for progress is lost, and that even worse times may be ahead.
  • Matthew Babcock '98 published his first poetry collection, Points of Reference (Folded Word, 2016), which takes readers on a road trip through poems as vast and straight as Montana highways.
  • Janna Barkin '88 wrote He's Always Been My Son (Jessica Kingsley Publishing, 2017), a mother's story about raising her transgender son from birth through to adulthood.
  • Elan Barnehama '78 wrote the novel Finding Bluefield (Bold Strokes Books, 2012), which centers on medical resident Barbara Phillips, who is content to basically hide out in a small Virginia town. When she enters Nicky's Diner, everything changes and -- against her better judgment -- she falls in love.
  • Alexander F. Barnes MA '83 is co-author of Forgotten Soldiers of World War I: America's Immigrant Doughboys (Schiffer Military History, 2018) and co-author of Let's Go: The History of the 29th Infantry Division 1917-2001 (Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 2014). 
  • Paula Baxter '75, MA '77 wrote Southwestern Indian Rings (Schiffer, 2011), a book that provides a design history of this jewelry form, from pre-contact artifacts to contemporary artistic innovations. Barry Katzen '76 took the more than 350 color photos that appear in the book.
  • Edward Baum '77 wrote Conceive the Inconceivable (Adell Press, 2018), a book that chronicles the journey that brought him and his wife closer together and ultimately to parenthood. 
  • Jan Becker '08 published The Sunshine Chronicles (Jitney Books, 2016), an inventive compilation of Facebook posts revealing an intimate portrait of a quirky writer and her South Florida surroundings. Readers will simultaneously LOL and find themselves deeply moved as Becker navigates domestic life with The Chef and Feline amidst a zany cast of neighbors and characters.
  • April Beisaw, MA '98, PhD '07 wrote Identifying and Interpreting Animal Bones: A Manual (Texas A&M University Press, 2013). With James G. Gibb, MA '85, PhD '94, she edited The Archaeology of Institutional Life (University of Alabama Press, 2009). Owen Lindauer '79 authored a chapter in that book.
  • Alfred Bendixen '73 edited A Companion to the American Novel (Wiley Blackwell, 2012), a collection of essays on the genre by many of the most distinguished scholars of American literature. His other recent books include A Companion to the American Short Story, co-edited with James Nagel (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010) and The Cambridge Companion to American Travel Writing, co-edited with Judith Hamera (Cambridge University Press, 2009).
  • Margot Berwin '84 published her first novel Hothouse Flower and the Nine Plants of Desire (Pantheon, 2009). It was optioned as a film by SONY Pictures, and will starJulia Roberts.
  • Michael Blumenthal '69 has published three books: Just Three Minutes, Please: Thinking Out Loud on Public Radio (Vandalia Press, 2014); Because They Needed Me: The Incredible Struggle of Rita Miljo to Save the Baboons of South Africa (Pleasure Boat Studios, 2014) and The Greatest Jewish-American Lover in Hungarian History: Stories (Etruscan Press, 2014).
  • Philip Brady, PhD '90 wrote Phantom Signs (University of Tennessee Press, 2018), an amalgam of his personae as a poet, professor, basketball player, editor and book publisher.
  • Simon J. Bronner '74 wrote Explaining Traditions: Folk Behavior in Modern Culture (University Press of Kentucky, 2012), which discusses the underlying reasons for the continuing significance of traditions, delving into their social and psychological roles in everyday life from old-time crafts to folk creativity on the Internet.
  • Thomas Brucie, PhD '02 published a chapbook of poems, Moments Around the Campfire with a Vietnam Vet (Cervena Barva Press, 2010). In addition, he has published a second poetry chapbook, Apprentice Lessons (Daniel's Vision Press, 2015), the novel, Weapons of Cain (MilSpeak Books, 2013), and a book of short stories, Still Waters: Five Stories (Tight Curtain Press, 2006).
  • Eugene Bryan '11 and Joseph D'Urso '11 wrote the science fiction novel The Aetherverse (Aether Press, LLC, 2016). They started the book while attending Binghamton University.
  • Roderick Bush, PhD '92 is the author of The End of White World Supremacy: Black Internationalism and the Problem of the Color Line (Temple University Press, 2009). He is an associate professor of sociology and anthropology at St. John's University in New York.
  • Jay Cadmus '83 is the author of Ordinary Man (Amazon Publishing, 2017).
  • Ronald Citron '75 wrote If God Intended the Sabbath, Why Did He Create Home Ownership? A Journey Through Sabbaths Lost (Westbow Press, 2014).
  • Regina M. Clark '82 published 101 Ways to Get Fit by 50 (Clark Training & Development, 2012). Inspired by a milestone birthday, Clark recommitted herself to a healthy lifestyle and set a goal to get fit by 50. In sharing her story, Clark demonstrates how a busy, working mom can redefine her lifestyle to focus on keeping fit.
  • Mark Coleman '98 wrote Time to Trust: Mobilizing Humanity for a Sustainable Future (Motivational Press, 2014), which challenges people to step up their games as global and local citizens.
  • John A. Conners '63, MS '70 wrote Groundwater for the 21st Century: A Primer for Citizens of Planet Earth (McDonald & Woodward, 2013). The book offers a rare and comprehensive overview of the science of groundwater; the long, diverse, and intensifying use of this resource by people; and the need for humans to utilize groundwater science when making or evaluating decisions about its use.
  • Jerry Cunningham '81 authored a book of holiday short stories for seventh and eighth graders called The Metal Horse Learns Spanglish (Rogue River Publishing, 2016).
  • Patricia Daneman '75, MA '80 has published two books of poetry: After All (FutureCycle Press, 2018) and Where the World Begins (Finishing Line Press, 2015).
  • Donald Davis '54 wrote Catching a Glimpse (XLibris, 2015), an array of glimpses written in many formats over the past 35 years; some memoirs, odes, ballads, short stories, short poems and animal stories are featured.
  • Lisa DeSiro '92 published Labor (Nixes Mate Books, 2018), a collection of poems about life in today's urban communities.
  • Nathan Englander '91 is translator of New American Haggadah (Little, Brown & Co., 2012), and is the author of What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank (Knopf Doubleday, 2013), and The Ministry of Special Cases (Knopf, 2007).
  • Hope Ewing '03 wrote Movers and Shakers: Women Making Waves in Spirits, Beer & Wine (The Unnamed Press, 2018), which showcases the various roles women have played in the alcohol business from bartender to winemaker to marketer to CEO.
  • Marjorie N. Feld '93 published her second book, Nations Divided: American Jews and the Struggle Over Apartheid (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), which chronicles American Jewish involvement in the battle against racial injustice in South Africa, and more broadly the long historical encounter between American Jews and apartheid.
  • Stephanie (Fiato) Monahan '00 published her first book 33 Valentines (Entangled Edge, 2013), a work of women's fiction.
  • Adrianne Finlay, PhD '05 wrote Your One & Only (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2018), an adult science fiction thriller where humankind is replaced by clones.
  • Norman Finkelstein '75 published his poetry collection The Ratio of Reason to Magic: New & Selected Poems (Dos Madres Press, 2016). He is the author of On Mount Vision: Forms of the Sacred in Contemporary American Poetry (University of Iowa Press, 2010), which asks how and why the sacred has remained a basic concern of contemporary experimental poets in a secular age.
  • Marcia Naomi (Fisch) Berger '66 is the author of Marriage Meetings for Lasting Love: 30 Minutes a Week to the Relationship You've Always Wanted (New World Library, 2014). Marcia's mission is to help people create a marriage that fosters the growth and vitality of both partners: emotionally and spiritually, as well as physically and materially.
  • Steven Flinn '78 wrote Optimizing Data-to-Learning-to-Action (Apress, 2018). He's an author and inventor; he founded and is CEO of ManyWorlds, Inc., a pioneer of machine learning-based solutions for enterprises.
  • Nancy Flynn, MA '94, is the author of the poetry collection, Every Door Recklessly Ajar (Cayuga Lake Books, 2015) as well as the poetry chapbooks, Eternity a Coal's Throw (Burning River Press, 2012) and The Hours of Us (Finishing Line Press, 2007).
  • Susan C. Fox, MA '95, PhD '01 is the author of As the Dust Settles: Finding Life at Ground Zero, the continuing story of the reconstitution and perseverance of a community facing uncertainty with the demolition of contaminated buildings, and a decade-long project of reconstruction following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
  • Lisa Rowe Fraustino, PhD '93 (with Karen Coats) edited Mothers in Children's and Young Adult Literature: From the Eighteenth Century to Postfeminism (University Press of Mississippi, 2018). The book leads readers, from didactic nursery rhymes to Coraline and The Hunger Games, through engagement with the vital figure of the mother.
  • Bruce Freeman '73 is co-author of Birthing the Elephant: A Woman's Go-for-it! Guide to Overcoming the Big Challenges of Launching a Business (Ten Speed Press, 2008).
  • Karen Friedman '98 (with Sara Merwin, MPH) published The Informed Patient: A Complete Guide to a Hospital Stay (Cornell University Press, 2018). This is a guide and a workbook, divided into topical, focused sections with step-by-step instructions, insights and tips to illustrate what patients and their families can expect during a hospital stay.
  • William H. Groner '77 (with Tom Teicholz) wrote 9/12: The Epic Battle of the Ground Zero Responders (Potomac Books, 2019). Groner's book is the saga of the epic nine-year legal battle he waged against the City of New York and its contractors on behalf of the more than 10,000 first responders who became ill as a result of working on the Ground Zero cleanup.
  • Carole (Goldsmith) Howard '66 is the author of About Face (Warwick Associates, 2011), the serious-but-funny story of a woman of a certain age who's trying to reconcile the pragmatic corporate executive she is with the idealistic Peace Corps volunteer she used to be.
  • Vincent F.A. Golphin, PhD '05 published the poetry book, 10 Stories Down (FootHills Publishing, 2011). The poems were inspired by time he spent in Beijing. Golphin is an assistant professor of English at Rochester Institute of Technology.
  • Jonathan Gottschall, MA '96, PhD '00 wrote The Professor in the Cage (Penguin Press, 2015), partly a memoir of the three years he spent trying to learn to fight, partly a non-fiction version of Fight Club, and partly a tour of the science and history of violence.
  • Peter Guttman '76 is the author of Christmas in America: A Photographic Celebration of the Holiday Season (Skyhorse Publishing, 2011). He has twice won the Lowell Thomas Travel Journalist of the Year Award.
  • Paulette Hackman, MA '83 wrote Story Rugs and Their Storytellers: Rug Hooking in the Narrative Style, which tells how you can make your own story rug. (Ampry Press, 2016).
  • Tara Fox Hall '98 co-edited Bedtime Shadows (Melange Books, 2012), a mixture of horror, speculative fiction and romance-stories of ghosts and vampires, future dystopias, travel through different dimensions, a holiday romance that changes everything, and a new twist on an ancient myth.
  • Darran Handshaw '07 published The Engineer (The Engineer's Press, 2017), an epic science fiction novel set in the ruined futuristic city of Redemption. It follows the adventures of Actaeon on his search for truth and understanding.
  • Jeffrey Hantman '74 is the author of Monacan Millennium: A Collaborative Archaeology and History of a Virginia Indian People (University of Virginia Press, 2018), a comprehensive study that reframes the Chesapeake's early colonial period.
  • Mala Hoffman '82 has published three chapbooks: Half Moon Over Midnight (Paper Kite Press, 2006), A Year of Wednesdays (Finishing Line Press, 2013) and Becoming Bubbe (The Poet's Haven, 2017).
  • Ashley Hurlburt-Biagini '05 is co-author of In Defiance, Runaways from Slavery in New York's Hudson River Valley, 1735-1831 (Black Dome Press, 2016), which features archival newspaper notices for runaway slaves, plus notices for slaves captured and other relevant historical documents.
  • Laura Lynne (Osvald) Jackson '94 is the author of The Light Between Us: Stories from Heaven. Lessons for the Living (Random House, 2015).
  • Toni Jaeger-Fine '83 wrote Becoming a Lawyer: Discovering and Defining Your Professional Persona (West Academic, 2018), a book intended to help legal professionals master concepts and behaviors not taught in law school or practice.
  • Pauline Kaldas, PhD '98 wrote The Time Between Places: Stories that Weave in and out of Egypt and America (University of Arkansas Press, 2011).
  • Jesse Kalfel '71, MS '76 is the author of So You're Cremated...Now What? (iUniverse, 2009).
  • Kathryn Karrer, MA '77 wrote the historical novel The Last Song of Albi (Fulton Publications, 2017), which revisits 1299, when a cathedral is being built in the French town of Albi.
  • Ellyn Kaschak '65 wrote Sight Unseen: Gender and Race Through Blind Eyes (Columbia University Press, 2015), a book that discusses the realities of race, gender and sexual orientation from the perspective of the blind.
  • Ronald Katz '76 is the author of Someone's Gonna Get Hired...It Might As Well be You!, a book that provides a roadmap to get from the unemployment line back into the workforce. Katz is the president of Penguin Human Resource Consulting.
  • Seth Kaufman '85 wrote The King of Pain (Sukuma Books, 2012). The book centers around Rick Salter, the mind behind an outrageous reality TV show about torture. He wakes up one Saturday morning to find himself trapped underneath his gigantic home entertainment system with no idea how he got there. Kaufman has been a reporter for the New York Post Page Six and the editorial director of TV Guide.com.
  • Alan Kavadlo '01 is the author of We're Working Out: A Zen Approach to Everyday Fitness (Muscle-Up Publications, 2010), a book about getting back to the basics, being mindful of and in your approach to fitness and learning how to accept your body but still push it further.
  • Steven G. Kellman '67 published American Suite (Finishing Line Press, 2018), the first book of poetry for the critic and academic best known for Redemption: The Life of Henry Roth (W.W. Norton, 2005) and Switching Languages: Translingual Writers Reflect on Their Craft (University of Nebraska Press, 2003).
  • David Kilpatrick MA '94, PhD '01 is the author of Writing with Blood: The Sacrificial Dramatist as Tragic Man (Eye Corner Press, 2011), a book about ecstatic states of consciousness that allows for a new form of subjectivity.
  • Adam Knight, MA '07 published his debut novel At The Trough (NineStar Press, 2019), a dystopian take on public education.
  • Michael C. LaSala '81 is the author of Coming Out, Coming Home (Columbia University Press, 2011). Through a qualitative, multicultural study of 65 gay and lesbian children and their parents, LaSala outlines effective, practice-tested interventions for families in transition.
  • Michael Laser '75 wrote My Impending Death (Permanent Press, 2015). He has written seven novels (four for adults, three for adolescents). He has been writing fiction since sophomore year at Binghamton.
  • Gail S. Leicht '85 created the Skinny Guide series, which is intended for the business traveler who has a limited amount of time to get to know a place. Titles include Boston, Chicago, New York and San Francisco.
  • David Lemm '02 wrote Regain Control: Financial Endurance For Life (Financial Endurance.com, 2009), a book geared toward surviving the economy through forward financial thinking.
  • Diana Linden '83 is the author of Ben Shahn's New Deal Murals: Jewish Identity in the American Scene" (Wayne State University Press, Fall 2015), a book that examines the role of Jewish identity in Shahn's works, showing how his subjects, themes and compositions painted Jews into the American scene.
  • Roger Ma '92 is the author of The Zombie Combat Manual: A Guide to Fighting the Living Dead (Penguin, 2010); the book is a guide to emerging victorious from hand-to-hand combat with a walking corpse.
  • Jo Malin, PhD '95 is the editor of My Life at the Gym: Feminist Perspectives on Community Through the Body (SUNY Press, 2010). Malin is a project director and grants specialist in the Graduate School of Education and adjunct assistant professor of English at Binghamton University.
  • Rafe Martin '66 is the author of Before Buddha Was Buddha: Learning From the Jataka Tales (Wisdom Publications, 2018). The book connects ancient Buddhist stories, meditation, contemporary Zen practice, koans, daily life, personal growth, and the worlds of myth, legend and literature.
  • Richard Martin '72 published Goosebumps of Antimatter (Spuyten Duyvil, 2018), the poetry book Techniques in the Neighborhood of Sleep (Spuyten Duyvil, 2016) and short story collection Buffoons in the Gene Pool (Lavender Ink, 2016). Martin is a past recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship for Poetry and founder of The Big Horror Poetry Series (Binghamton, 1983-96).
  • Sheila Massoni, PhD '07 is the author of Morgan: Writing Through Grief (Finishing Line Press, 2009).
  • Helen Matatov '03 is the co-authored of Democracy is not a Spectator Sport (Skyhorse Publishing, 2011).
  • Nancy Fessenden McEntee '77, MA '89 wrote Haversacks, Hardtack and Unserviceable Mules: the Civil War Journey of a Union Quartermaster in Tennessee (CreateSpace, 2017).
  • Sally (Sarah) McGraw '98, creator of the daily style and body image blog Already Pretty, released the book, Already Pretty: Learning to Love Your Body by Learning to Dress It Well (CreateSpace, 2012). Structured as a fun and accessible self-guided makeover, Already Pretty is the antidote to cookie-cutter style guides.
  • Jemil Metti, MA '77 wrote Operation Olive Tree (Outskirts Press, 2018), a story about two opera-talented teenagers (an Israeli and a Palestinian) who develop a friendship and who dream to sing for peace.
  • Suzanne Michael '73 is the co-author of Not on Speaking Terms: Clinical Strategies to Resolve Family and Friendship Cutoffs (W.W. Norton & Co., 2014), a book that can help therapists, patients and the general public better understand the causes of cutoffs, how to reconcile them, and move on through healing.
  • Jennifer Miller '89, MBA '91 co-authored the career planning textbook Creating Career Success: A Flexible Plan for the World of Work (Cengage Learning , 2013). The book is designed to help students navigate the twists and turns they may encounter upon entering the workforce by developing a self-directed, proactive plan to launch and manage their careers over the years to come.
  • Dr. Jodi Mindell '84 co-authored a parenting book entitled Take Charge of Your Child's Sleep: The All-in-One Resource for Solving Sleep Problems in Kids and Teens.
  • Michelle E. Moore, MA '96, PhD '01 wrote Chicago and the Making of American Modernism: Cather, Hemingway, Faulkner, and Fitzgerald in Conflict (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018).
  • Linda Johnston Muhlhausen '71 wrote the novel Elephant Mountain (Blast Press, 2018) based on her time as a Peace Corps volunteer teacher in Uganda in the early 1970s.
  • Megeen R. Mulholland '89 published her first volume of poetry Orbit (Finishing Line Press, 2018) which one reviewer says, "explores the beauty in the ordinary and the joy in the familiar."
  • Elizabeth Bloomer Nesvold '90 co-authored The Art of M&A Valuation and Modeling (McGraw-Hill, 2015). Liz is founder and managing partner of Silver Lane Advisors, an M&A investment bank that specializes in the financial services industry.
  • Bradford J. Novak '68 wrote Appeal To A Higher Father (2010), available through the Kindle bookstore at Amazon.com. The book carries the premise that the president of the United States does indeed appeal to his higher father (Bob Woodward's interview with George W. Bush just after the Iraqi invasion) and is actually visited by him in the Oval Office.
  • Ira Noveck '84 wrote Experimental Pragmatics: The Making of a Cognitive Science (Cambridge University Press, 2018), which focuses on how listeners process utterances to understand what a speaker really wants to say.
  • Neil O'Donnell, MA '99 published two books: Bellwood, OCD and Me (Argus Enterprises International, 2011), a memoir of his lifelong battle with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); and Vlara's Song (Argus Enterprises International, 2011), an anthology of fantasy-genre short stories which served as a foundation for a novel he previously published. He lives in Lancaster, N.Y., and teaches critical theory and anthropology courses at Canisius College.
  • Melissa Ostrom '95 teaches English at Genesee Community College in Batavia, N.Y., and is the author of the young adult historical novel The Beloved Wild (Feiwel & Friends, 2018). Her short fiction has appeared in The Florida Review, Passages North, The Baltimore Review, and Fourteen Hills, among other journals, and her second novel is Unleaving (Macmillan, 2019).
  • Steven Ovadia '98 published his second book Learn Linux in a Month of Lunches (Manning Publications, 2016), a book designed to teach non-technical users about the free and open source Linux operating system.
  • Camille Paglia '68 published Provocations (Pantheon, 2018), a collection of her greatest essays that also includes a new original introduction by the author. She has offered provocative views on everyone from Hillary Clinton to Bernie Sanders, and Madonna to Rihanna, while presenting passionate debates on art, gender issues and even the Real Housewives TV series.
  • Joshua Palmatier, PhD '05 had several fantasy novels published by DAW Books and Baen including: The Skewed Throne, The Cracked Throne, The Vacant Throne, Well of Sorrows, Leaves of Flame, Breath of Heaven, Shattering the Ley, Threading the Needle and Reaping the Aurora.
  • Mitch Pearlstein '70, founder and president of the Center of the American Experiment, wrote Broken Bonds: What Family Fragmentation Means For America's Future (Rowman & Littlefield, 2014). He explores the declining state of the American family and discusses what its disintegration means for our future.
  • Shari Lawrence Pfleeger '70, PhD is the author of almost two dozen books on software engineering, software quality and cyber security. Her software engineering text, Software Engineering: Theory and Practice (with Joanne Atlee, 4th edition, Prentice Hall, 2010), is used worldwide. Her cyber security textbook, Security in Computing (with Charles Pfleeger and Jonathan Margulies, 5th edition, Prentice Hall, 2012), has been one of Prentice Hall's best-selling texts since the first edition was published in the 1980s. In 2016, Pfleeger turned her attention from technology to poetry; she has since won several poetry prizes, with poetry published in the U.S. and England.
  • Matthew Phillips '05 published The Island's Only Escape (A Pleasure Boat Studio, 2018), a collection of poems he wrote when he was studying Mideast history and politics and when he was questioning the many tensions of that region.
  • Dean Rader, MA '91, PhD '95, published the collection of poems Works & Days (Truman State University Press), which won the prestigious T. S. Eliot Poetry Prize for 2010.
  • Jim Reuther ’76 authored Gunky’s Adventures In the Land of the Must Believe (LifeRich, 2019), a heartfelt, humorous, tear-jerking, full of wonder and zany anthology of short stories and poems on nature, mystery, family, friends, foes, and fails, one for each letter of the alphabet, and inspired by his beloved late wife. 
  • Bruce Ritter '81 wrote a novel under the pen name Bruce Adams. The Palace of Dreams (Bryce Cullen Publishing, 2012) takes readers on a gripping, unforgettable adventure. Torn between his loyalty to his brother and his responsibility to the rest of the world, protagonist Del Verdan embarks upon a journey that will alter him forever.
  • Faith Rogow, MA '83, PhD '89 is co-author of The Teacher's Guide to Media Literacy: Critical Thinking in a Multimedia World (Corwin, 2012). This text, by two veteran media literacy educators, is a combination of theory and practical application appropriate for students in methods courses as well as teachers in the field, administrators and policy makers.
  • Lawrence Rosenblum '83 is the author of See What I'm Saying: The Extraordinary Powers of Our Five Senses (W.W. Norton & Co., 2010), a book that explores the astonishing abilities of the five senses, skills of which most of us are remarkably unaware.
  • Michael E. Rothman '82 is co-author of Edibolic Stress: How The Lies You Are Being Fed Are Making You Sick (Outskirts Press, 2012). The book address' the myths that make people sick and offers factual information to restore health and vitality.
  • Lee B. Salz '92 is the author of the following books: Sales Differentiation (HarperCollins, 2018), Hire Right, Higher Profits (CreateSpace, 2014), Business Expert Guide to Small Business Success (Business Expert Publishing, 2010), Stop Speaking for Free! The Ultimate Guide to Making Money with Webinars (Business Expert Publishing, 2010), and Soar Despite Your Dodo Sales Manager (Wbusiness Books, 2007).
  • Maria Elena Sandovici, MA '02, PhD '05 wrote Stray Dogs and Lonely Beaches: Seeking Love in a World Full of Evil Stepmothers (CreateSpace, 2015), which covers a young woman's journey from Bucharest to New York, Cancun, and Paris, in the pursuit of the love that has eluded her all her life.
  • Marianna Savoca '89 co-authored A Good Job: Campus Employment as a High Impact Practice, with George S. Clellan and Kristina Creager (Stylus, 2018). The book helps college and university administrators improve the experience of students who work on campus.
  • Vincent Scarsella '76 wrote The Anonymous Man (Aignos Press, 2013) about a man who fakes his own death to collect a $4 million life insurance policy only to be betrayed by his co-conspirators in the plot, his wife and best friend. He also published a guide for consumers of legal services, Lawyers Gone Bad: How to Get Even With A Lawyer Who's A Lying, Cheating, Thieving, Disloyal, Dishonest, Procrastinating, Neglectful, Abusive, or Otherwise Unethical Scoundrel, available for Kindle and Nook devices.
  • Jeffery Lyle Segal, MA '79 is co-producer and co-author of book, music and lyrics for I Come for Love, a musical presented last fall at the New York Musical Theater Festival. It's the story of an alien girl in search of romance who crashes her flying saucer at Roswell, N.M., in 1949, and falls for a reporter who thinks she's a nice, down-to-Earth girl.
  • Ben Serviss '05 published an eBook, How to Score Your First Game Job, about how to break into the video game industry. It's based on the 10 years he has spent working in games, along with the experiences of 11 other game developers he interviewed.
  • Sherrie (Shamoon) Schneider '80 is co-author of Not Your Mother's Rules: The New Secrets for Dating (Grand Central Publishing, 2013), which People magazine called a 2014 "must read." This book is the latest installment in the best-selling The Rules series.
  • Karen Halvorsen Schreck, MA '87 wrote her fourth novel, Broken Ground (Simon & Schuster/Howard Books, 2016), a lyrical romance about a young woman who found herself a widow when her husband was killed in an oil rig accident.
  • Gary Shapiro '77 wrote Ninja Future: Secrets to Success in the New World of Innovation (HarperCollins, 2018), Ninja Innovation: The Ten Killer Strategies of the World's Most Successful Businesses (HarperCollins, 2013) and (with foreword by Mark Cuban) The Comeback: How Innovation Will Restore the American Dream (Beaufort Books, 2011).
  • Karla Slocum, MA '91 wrote Black Towns, Black Future (University of North Carolina Press, 2019).
  • Karen Reichel Smith, DNP '14 is the author of Nursing Chose Me: Called to an Art of Compassion (Create Space, 2015), a candid recounting of life as a nurse.
  • Paul D. Smith '91, MA '99 is the author of the Jason and the Draconauts Series (independently published 2013, 2015 and 2017). 
  • John J. Sosik, PhD '95 and Dong Il Jung, PhD '97 wrote Full Range Leadership Development (2nd edition, Routledge, 2018), a book that has been called a moral compass for those who strive to be transformational leaders.
  • Linda Budinoff Spurlock '76, MA '86 is the editor of Caves & Culture: 10,000 Years of Ohio History (Kent State University Press, 2006). The book seeks to address a number of issues, including the use of rock shelters by humans through time.
  • Irwin Stoolmacher '69 is one of three co-authors of Mission Possible: How You Can Start and Operate a Soup Kitchen (Open Door Publications, 2011). Stoolmacher, a marketing and fundraising consultant who heads the Stoolmacher Consulting Group in Lawrence, N.J., and his co-authors draw on their 35 years of experience working with the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen in Trenton, N.J.
  • Deborah Tannen '66 is best known as the author of You Just Don't Understand: Women and Men in Conversation, which was on The New York Times Best Seller list for nearly four years, including eight months as No. 1, and has been translated into 29 languages.
  • Michael Testani, Sr., MS '02, Sreekanth Ramakrishnan, PhD '08 and Sean Gillespie wrote Lean for Sales: Bringing the Science of Lean to the Art of Selling (CRC Press, 2016), a book that describes the Lean journey as it extends to a business area that is mission critical, yet has been virtually untouched by the Lean transformation.
  • Madelyn Cohen Travis '87 published Jews and Jewishness in British Children's Literature (Routledge, 2013), an interdisciplinary study exploring the often politicized nature of constructions of one of Britain's longest standing minority communities.
  • Mary Pat Kelly Upright '04 is the author of Tell Them For Me (Page Publishing, 2017), an autobiography that shows evidence that we are spirit beings as well as physical beings. It speaks of the obvious social class differences people contribute to others, issues and realities of child abuse, domestic violence, and death's effect from the Vietnam War.
  • Hugo J.J. Uyttenhove, MS '75, PhD '78 wrote Rembrandt Redux (Author House, 2013) and Grand Scale Larceny: The Heist of the Flemish Primitives (Lulu.com, 2010).
  • Edward VanDerbeck '63, professor emeritus at Xavier University, published Principles of Cost Accounting, 17th ed., (Cengage Learning, 2015).
  • Chuck Wasielewski '04 (writing under the name C.W. Briar) published Wrath and Ruin (Splickety Publishing Group, 2016), an anthology of fantasy and science fiction stories threaded with traditional horror.
  • Mary Waters-Sayer '89 is the author of The Blue Bath (St. Martin's Press, 2016), a novel that tells the story of an American expatriate in London who attends an opening at a prestigious Mayfair art gallery and is astonished to find her own face on the walls.
  • Stacy Werner '91 (writing as Stacy Hoff) wrote Mad For You in Madrid (Soul Mate Publishing, 2018), part of the prolific romance writer's Building Love series.
  • Dori Weinstein '89 wrote Sliding into the New Year (Yotzeret Publishing, 2011), the first book in the YaYa & YoYo series. Fifth-grader Ellie (YaYa) Silver has been waiting all summer to visit the town's new water park. Her best friend, Megan, invites her to go, but twin brother, Joel (YoYo), points out that Megan is going on Rosh Hashanah.
  • Jennifer (Johnson) Wichman '95, who writes under the pen name J.J. Johnson, is the author of the novels This Girl is Different (Peachtree Publishers, 2011), The Theory of Everything (Peachtree Publishers, 2012), and Believarexic (Peachtree Publishers, 2015).
  • Dana Wilde, MA '85, PhD '95 published a collection of naturalist essays Summer to Fall: Notes and Numina from the Maine Woods (North Country Press, 2016).
  • Fred Williams '86 wrote Fight Back Against Unfair Debt Collection Practices (FT Press, 2010), a first-hand look inside a dark corner of the financial industry.