Alumni Authors

Please note this web page covers books published within the last five years and in no way constitutes a complete listing of Binghamton University alumni authors. If you're an author and would like to have your book listed on this page, contact us at alumni@binghamton.edu.

  • Diana Abu-Jaber, PhD '86, wrote Fencing with the King (W.W. Norton & Co., 2022), a tale of adventure, suspense and intrigue.
  • Douglas Ambrose, PhD '91, wrote Your Obedient Servant: The Letters of Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr (Fenimore Art Museum, 2019), based on the museum's documents pertaining to the life and death of Alexander Hamilton.
  • Jonathan D. Anzalone, MA '03, wrote Battles of the North Country: Wilderness Politics and Recreational Development in the Adirondack State Park, 1920–1980 (University of Massachusetts Press, 2018). He is a lecturer and assistant director at the Center for News Literacy in the School of Journalism at Stony Brook University. 
  • Dora Apel '74 published Calling Memory into Place (Rutgers University Press, 2020). Because memory is key to social justice, this book looks at the ways that memorials, photographs, artworks and autobiographies fuel a process of “unforgetting.”
  • Marc Arginteanu '89 wrote Azazel’s Public House (Solstice, 2022). The concepts central to the book, of physical and psychic violations of one’s brain, align with the author's professional training as a neurosurgeon.
  • Janna Barkin '88 wrote He's Always Been My Son (Jessica Kingsley Publishing, 2017), a mother's story about raising her transgender son from birth through to adulthood.
  • Elan Barnehama '78 wrote Escape Route (Running Wild Press, 2022), a novel told by a first-generation son of Holocaust survivors who becomes obsessed with the Vietnam War.
  • Alexander F. Barnes MA '83, is co-author of Forgotten Soldiers of World War I: America's Immigrant Doughboys (Schiffer Military History, 2018).
  • Edward Baum '77 wrote Conceive the Inconceivable (Adell Press, 2018), a book that chronicles the journey that brought him and his wife closer together and ultimately to parenthood. 
  • Lynn Becker '83 published the picture book, Monsters in the Briny (Sleeping Bear Press, 2022). The book is set to the tune of "What Do You Do with a Drunken Sailor" as a ship's crew contends with a coterie of mythical sea creatures demanding comfort and attention.
  • Bruce Benderson '69 — novelist, essayist and translator — is celebrating the complete collection of his short fiction, Urban Gothic, to be released by Itna Press Oct. 1. The 675-page book contains every story he has written and published over his 50-year career and includes 21 new texts.
  • Thomas Besom, MA '87, PhD '00, wrote Child of the Snows (Golden Antelope Press, 2021), which brings to life the world of a 16th century Aymara community, a small part of the Inca empire.
  • Caroline Bobick '09 wrote Censored (Amazon.com Services LLC, 2020), a book inspired by true stories of families around the world today, and considered essential reading for those wishing to understand the implications of eroding human rights.
  • Philip Brady, PhD '90, wrote Phantom Signs (University of Tennessee Press, 2018), an amalgam of his personae as a poet, professor, basketball player, editor and book publisher.
  • James G. Buickerood ’81 is the editor of From Enlightenment to Rebellion: Essays in Honor of Christopher Fox (Bucknell University Press, 2018). This collection of essays celebrates the scholarly and administrative career of Christopher B. Fox, MA '74, PhD ’78, co-founder of the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies, and professor of English the University of Notre Dame.
  • Jay Cadmus '83 is the author of Ordinary Man (Amazon Publishing, 2017).
  • Tina Chang '91 is the author of Hybrida (W.W. Norton, 2019), which confronts the complexities of raising a mixed-race child during an era of political upheaval in the United States. She is director of creative writing at Binghamton University.
  • Stephen Corey '71, MA '73 published As My Age Then Was, So I Understood Them: New and Selected Poems, 1981-2021 (White Pine Press, 2022).
  • Rebecca (Dalton) Cassidy ‘97 wrote Working with Women: Successful Tips for Working Together (New Degree Press, 2021), one of the few resources offering research-based reasons for women's stereotypical behavior at work, tips for how to succeed and stories that lift women up. 
  • Stephanie DeCarolis '06 wrote The Guilty Husband (Harper Collins/HQ Stories, 2021), a novel about a man who seems to have the perfect marriage but draws attention when the intern he was having an affair with is found dead.
  • Jeana DelRosso '92 published her fifth book, Unruly Catholic Feminists: Prose, Poetry and the Future of Faith. co-edited with Leigh Eicke and Ana Kothe (Excelsior Editions/SUNY Press, 2021). This collection of poetry, prose and fiction explores how third- and fourth-wave feminists come to terms with Catholicism in the 21st century.
  • Lisa DeSiro '92 published the poetry collection Simple as a Sonnet (Kelsay Books, 2021).
  • Geraldin Noemis Diaz '19 wrote Reroute: Post Grad Guide to Success - Physically, Mentally and Financially (New Degree Press, 2020), a guide to help new college graduates discover they are capable of everything they want to achieve. 
  • Scott M. Eckers '02, MSEd '04, wrote Hidden History of East Meadow (The History Press, 2022), which discusses fascinating and long-forgotten moments in the history of this Long Island hamlet.
  • Hope Ewing '03 wrote Movers and Shakers: Women Making Waves in Spirits, Beer & Wine (The Unnamed Press, 2018), which showcases the various roles women have played in the alcohol business from bartender to winemaker to marketer to CEO.
  • Jakob Feinig, PhD ’15, wrote Moral Economies of Money: Politics and the Monetary Constitution of Society (Stanford University Press, 2022). Feinig is an assistant professor of human development at Binghamton University.
  • Adrianne Finlay, MA '99, PhD '05, wrote Your One & Only (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2018), an adult science fiction thriller where humankind is replaced by clones.
  • Jerry Finkelstein '75 wrote Where Are Your (K)nots?: Getting Unstuck in Your Life (BookBaby, 2022), a book that explores how the emotional knots we develop and carry with us through our lives prevent us from living our lives fully.
  • Marcia Naomi (Fisch) Berger '66 is the author of Marriage Minded: An A to Z Dating Guide for Lasting Love (She Writes Press, 2021).  
  • Steven Flinn '78 wrote Optimizing Data-to-Learning-to-Action (Apress, 2018). He's an author and inventor; he founded and is CEO of ManyWorlds, Inc., a pioneer of machine learning-based solutions for enterprises.
  • Lori Duffy Foster, MA '00, wrote A Dead Man's Eyes: A Lisa Jamison Mystery (Level Best Books, 2021), a book where the hero risks her life and the lives of her daughter and their closest friend on a dangerous quest for answers.
  • Lisa Rowe Fraustino, PhD '93, (with Karen Coats) edited Mothers in Children's and Young Adult Literature: From the Eighteenth Century to Postfeminism (University Press of Mississippi, 2018). The book leads readers, from didactic nursery rhymes to Coraline and The Hunger Games, through engagement with the vital figure of the mother.
  • Mark Freeman '77 wrote Do I Look at You with Love? Reimagining the Story of Dementia (Brill, 2021), a book that explores the experience of dementia as it transpired during the course of the final 12 years of his mother's life, from the time of her diagnosis until her death at age 93.
  • Karen Friedman '98 (with Sara Merwin, MPH) published The Informed Patient: A Complete Guide to a Hospital Stay (Cornell University Press, 2018). This is a guide and a workbook, divided into topical, focused sections with step-by-step instructions, insights and tips to illustrate what patients and their families can expect during a hospital stay.
  • Adam J. Gellings, PhD ’19, published his debut poetry collection Little Palace (Stephen F. Austin University Press, 2022), a reminder of the truths of human connection, the escapism feel of travel and the universal nature of art.
  • Annette (Gennaro) Marinaccio '81 wrote Your Soul Focus: You Believe in the Afterlife, Don't You? (Inphinite Lumen LLC, 2021), a spiritual book written in a practical way that unfolds her journey and what she has learned through relatives on the other side.
  • Maria Giura, PhD '06, is the author of Celibate: A Memoir (Apprentice House, 2019); she wrote the first draft of this book for her creative dissertation at Binghamton.
  • Natalie Elisha Gold '09 wrote the children's book For I Am Ruth: A Tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg (independently published, 2020).
  • Robert Steven Goldstein ’73 wrote the literary fiction book Cat's Whisker (Koehler Books, 2021).  It chronicles the life of Samuel Baron, an engineer, inventor, and successful entrepreneur. His life is a quest for a view of the cosmos where science and spirituality don't just peacefully coexist. He also published Enemy Queen (SparkPress, 2020), a dark comedy that explores the nature of friendship.
  • Matthew Graham '76 is the author of four books of poetry, including The Geography of Home (Galileo Press, 2019). He was selected as State Poet Laureate of Indiana, 2020-22.
  • William H. Groner '77 (with Tom Teicholz) wrote 9/12: The Epic Battle of the Ground Zero Responders (Potomac Books, 2019). Groner's book is the saga of the epic nine-year legal battle he waged against the City of New York and its contractors on behalf of the more than 10,000 first responders who became ill as a result of working on the Ground Zero cleanup.
  • Jordan Gruber ’81, MA ’83, co-authored Your Symphony of Selves: Discover and Understand More of Who We Are (Park Street Press, 2020). The book provides a transformative look at the idea of healthy multiplicity: that everyone has multiple selves, and learning to work with them is the true key to success and happiness.
  • Max E. Guttman '08, MSW '12 (as J. Peters) wrote University on Watch: Crisis in the Academy (Austin Macauley, 2020).
  • Joan Gluckauf Haahr '61 wrote Prisoners of Memory: A Jewish Family from Nazi Germany (Full Court Press, 2021), in which she  realizes her lifelong ambition to uncover the stories behind the statistics in the Nazi records and learn as much as possible about the pre-war lives, deportations and deaths of her grandparents and other close family members. 
  • Clarence Jefferson Hall, Jr. ’01, MA ’03, wrote A Prison in the Woods: Environment and Incarceration in New York's North Country (University of Massachusetts Press, 2020), which traces the planning, construction and operation of penitentiaries in five Adirondack Park communities from the 1840s to the present day.
  • Darran Handshaw '07 published his second novel, The Dark Heart of Redemption (The Engineer's Press, 2022), a science fiction and fantasy novel set in the ruined futuristic city of Redemption.
  • Jeffrey Hantman '74 is the author of Monacan Millennium: A Collaborative Archaeology and History of a Virginia Indian People (University of Virginia Press, 2018), a comprehensive study that reframes the Chesapeake's early colonial period.
  • Merrit Hartblay ’76, MSW ’16, wrote Lost Innocence: My Journey From Addiction to Recovery (Independently published, 2020), which shares his difficult escape from the dark places where addiction took him.
  • Scott Harvey '06 wrote Savagely Noble: A Young Man’s Journey From Ignorance, Through Illusion, To Identity (independently published, 2020).
  • Zina L. Hassel '75 wrote My Armadillo Skin: How I Made It As A Woman In The Field Of Telecom (ZLH Enterprises Publishing, 2020), a rare roadmap to the C-suite.
  • Sari Hausler ’92 published I Am .. an ABC Book (Book Baby, 2022), a picture book that encourages children of all ages to identify their best traits and expand their vocabulary. 
  • Gail Hennessey, MST ’80, is the author of Mrs. Paddington and the Silver Mousetraps: A Hair-Raising History of Women's Hairstyles in 18th-century London (Red Chair Press, 2019), a work of fiction that explains a very real fashion trend and the problems it created for women trying to look stylish.
  • Mala Hoffman '82 published the poetry chapbook A History of Place (Finishing Line Press, 2022), an exploration of personal history and an examination of where to place those reflections in present day life. 
  • Vincent Ialenti '08 wrote Deep Time Reckoning: How Future Thinking Can Help Earth Now (MIT Press, 2020), a guide for envisioning the planet's far future.
  • Paul DuBois Jacobs '88 published the fourth installment of his Mack Rhino Private Eye series The Lost Lost-and-Found Case (Simon & Schuster/Aladdin, 2022). He is the author of more than 20 books for children, including My Subway Ride (with Jennifer Swender) and Abiyoyo Returns (with musician Pete Seeger).
  • Toni Jaeger-Fine '83 wrote Becoming a Lawyer: Discovering and Defining Your Professional Persona (West Academic, 2018), a book intended to help legal professionals master concepts and behaviors not taught in law school or practice.
  • Elizabeth Jeglic, MA '01, PhD '03, published Sexual Grooming: Integrating Research, Practice, Prevention, and Policy (Springer, 2022).
  • Karan Johar '08 is the author of Fighting Chronic Back Pain: Bring LIFE Back to Your YEARS! (independently published, 2020).
  • Kathryn Karrer, MA '77, wrote the historical novel The Last Song of Albi (Fulton Publications, 2017), which revisits 1299, when a cathedral is being built in the French town of Albi.
  • Stephanie Cohen Katzovicz '96 (as Steph Katzovi) wrote HurriCamp! (Brown Books, 2022), her debut middle-grade fiction novel. The book chronicles a pre-teen's first time at sleepaway camp. The story is set at Camp Hillside (named for one of the author's Binghamton residence halls).
  • Steven G. Kellman '67 wrote Rambling Prose (Trinity University Press, 2020), a collection of essays culled from his lifetime of work on comparative literature, criticism and film studies. He also published American Suite (Finishing Line Press, 2018).
  • Adam Knight, MA '07, published his debut novel At The Trough (NineStar Press, 2019), a dystopian take on public education.
  • Liren (Legaspi) Baker '95 published her first cookbook, Meat to the Side: A Plant-Forward Guide to Bringing Balance to Your Plate (Victory Belt Publishing, 2021), a beginner’s guide for people who want a delicious way to add more vegetables to their diets. 
  • Jesse Lubinsky '98 co-authored two books with Dave Burgess Consulting, Inc. They are Reality Bytes: Innovative Learning Using Augmented and Virtual Reality (2020) and The Esports Education Playbook: Empowering Every Learner Through Inclusive Gaming (2020).
  • Rafe Martin '66 is the author of Before Buddha Was Buddha: Learning From the Jataka Tales (Wisdom Publications, 2018). The book connects ancient Buddhist stories, meditation, contemporary Zen practice, koans, daily life, personal growth, and the worlds of myth, legend and literature.
  • Nancy Fessenden McEntee '77, MA '89, wrote Haversacks, Hardtack and Unserviceable Mules: the Civil War Journey of a Union Quartermaster in Tennessee (CreateSpace, 2017).
  • David K. McKenas '77 wrote Shocked: Life and Death at 35,000 Feet (DartFrog Books, 2021), which answers the question, "What happens if I or someone I love has a life-threatening medical event on an airplane?"
  • Hazell McKenzie, MSW '19, wrote Suitcase of Dreams (GenZ Publishing, 2019), which recounts her quest for the American dream after arriving in the U.S. as a teenager and facing many hardships. In 2018, she won the "Worst Cook in America" contest on Food Network.
  • Paul E. McMahon, MA ’73, published Shy Boys: Notes from Ten Years of Working with Software Engineering Giants (Leanpub/Kindle Direct, 2019). Under the pen name Fred E. McMichaels, he wrote A Quiet Little Town: A Lighthearted Science Fiction Story That Could Happen to You (Leanpub/Kindle Direct, 2018).
  • Jemil Metti, MA '77, wrote Operation Olive Tree (Outskirts Press, 2018), a story about two opera-talented teenagers (an Israeli and a Palestinian) who develop a friendship and who dream to sing for peace.
  • Glenn Erick Miller, MA 98, wrote a young adult novel, Camper Girl (Regal House Publishing, 2020). Set in the Adirondacks, Camper Girl follows recent high-school grad Shannon Burke, who embarks on a journey that tests her will and reveals a stunning family secret.
  • Michelle E. Moore, MA '96, PhD '01, wrote Chicago and the Making of American Modernism: Cather, Hemingway, Faulkner, and Fitzgerald in Conflict (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018).
  • Bonnie J. Morris, MA ’85, PhD ’88, wrote What's the Score? 25 Years of Teaching Women's Sports History (Indiana University Press, 2022), an insider's view of sports education as well as a guide to turning points in women's sports history.
  • Linda Johnston Muhlhausen '71 wrote the novel Elephant Mountain (Blast Press, 2018) based on her time as a Peace Corps volunteer teacher in Uganda in the early 1970s.
  • Megeen R. Mulholland, MA '88, published her first volume of poetry Orbit (Finishing Line Press, 2018) which one reviewer says, "explores the beauty in the ordinary and the joy in the familiar."
  • Ira Noveck '84 wrote Experimental Pragmatics: The Making of a Cognitive Science (Cambridge University Press, 2018), which focuses on how listeners process utterances to understand what a speaker really wants to say.
  • Melissa Ostrom '95 teaches English at Genesee Community College in Batavia, N.Y., and is the author of the young adult historical novel The Beloved Wild (Feiwel & Friends, 2018). Her short fiction has appeared in The Florida Review, Passages North, The Baltimore Review, and Fourteen Hills, among other journals, and her second novel is Unleaving (Macmillan, 2019).
  • Camille Paglia '68 published Provocations (Pantheon, 2018), a collection of her greatest essays that also includes a new original introduction by the author. She has offered provocative views on everyone from Hillary Clinton to Bernie Sanders, and Madonna to Rihanna, while presenting passionate debates on art, gender issues and even the Real Housewives TV series.
  • Matthew Phillips '05 published The Island's Only Escape (A Pleasure Boat Studio, 2018), a collection of poems he wrote when he was studying Mideast history and politics and when he was questioning the many tensions of that region.
  • Anna Qu '06 wrote Made in China: A Memoir of Love and Labor (Catapult, 2021), a true story about her journey as an immigrant.
  • John R. Rahn '06 published The UNBEATABLE Mindset (independently published, 2020), a tool for goal setting, motivation and routine building.
  • Jim Reuther ’76 authored Gunky’s Adventures In the Land of the Must Believe (LifeRich, 2019), a heartfelt, humorous, tear-jerking, full of wonder and zany anthology of short stories and poems on nature, mystery, family, friends, foes, and fails, one for each letter of the alphabet, and inspired by his beloved late wife. 
  • Isaac Sacolick '93 wrote Digital Trailblazer: Essential Lessons to Jumpstart Transformation and Accelerate Your Technology Leadership (Wiley, 2022). The book is a hands-on guide to help technology and business professionals at all career stages acquire skills to drive transformative change.
  • Marianna Savoca '89 co-authored A Good Job: Campus Employment as a High Impact Practice, with George S. Clellan and Kristina Creager (Stylus, 2018). The book helps college and university administrators improve the experience of students who work on campus.
  • Jasmine Sawers '08 published the flash fiction book The Anchored World: Flash Fairy Tales and Folklore (Rose Metal Press, 2022), offering a new mythology to reflect the many faces and voices of the 21st century.
  • Charles Semowich ’71 wrote A History of Interfaith (De Laetsburg Press, 2020), which includes discussions of religious tolerance, comparative religion and interspirituality.
  • Ben Serviss '05 published How to Score Your First Game Job (CreateSpace, 2017). It's based on the 10 years he has spent working in video games, along with the experiences of 11 other game developers he interviewed.
  • Gary Shapiro '77 wrote Ninja Future: Secrets to Success in the New World of Innovation (HarperCollins, 2018).
  • Karla Slocum, MA '91 wrote Black Towns, Black Future (University of North Carolina Press, 2019).
  • Erin Elizabeth Smith ’04 wrote Down (Stephen F. Austin University Press, 2020), a book offering a new take on Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.
  • Steven M. Smith, MA '84, published his debut collection of poems Strongman Contest (Kelsay Books, 2021).
  • Danielle Sofer, MM '08, published the monograph Sex Sounds (MIT Press, 2022).
  • John J. Sosik, PhD '95, and Dong Il Jung, PhD '97, wrote Full Range Leadership Development (2nd edition, Routledge, 2018), a book that has been called a moral compass for those who strive to be transformational leaders.
  • Robyn (Spodek) Schindler '03 published her first childrens book, Three Brave Stars (Our Galaxy Publishing LLC, 2022). Schindler, a psychotherapist and owner of Paint the Stars Art Therapy, wrote and illustrated the book as part of her grief journey after losing her father to brain cancer. 
  • John Suval '91 published the monograph Dangerous Ground: Squatters, Statesmen and the Antebellum Rupture of American Democracy (Oxford University Press, 2022), which examines the position of American West white squatters in U.S. political culture. 
  • Deborah A. Symonds, MA '81, PhD '85, wrote Elizabeth Fox-Genovese: Paternalism's Daughter (University of Virginia Press, 2021), a biography of the historian who was notorious as a leftist when she taught at Binghamton, and later an extreme right Catholic conservative.
  • Terrence Tierney ’75 produced the poetry collection The Poet's Garage (Unsolicited Press, 2020).
  • Mary Pat Kelly Upright '04 is the author of Tell Them For Me (Page Publishing, 2017), an autobiography that shows evidence that we are spirit beings as well as physical beings. It speaks of the obvious social class differences people contribute to others, issues and realities of child abuse, domestic violence, and death's effect from the Vietnam War.
  • Glenn H. Utter '67 published The Religious Right and American Politics (Grey House Publishing, 2019), which includes chapters on the Religious Right and Science, Electoral Politics and Voting, Cultural Issues, Economic Issues, and American Foreign Policy.
  • Stacy Werner '91 (writing as Stacy Hoff) wrote Mad For You in Madrid (Soul Mate Publishing, 2018), part of the prolific romance writer's Building Love series.
  • Alex Wiesendanger '05 wrote Seeds of Justice (Orbis Books, 2020), a handbook to translate a commitment to social justice into effective action.
  • Steven Mark Weiss ’70 published The 96 Incarnations: Who Are You? (independently published, 2020). It’s his third book on astrology, a happy melding of reincarnation and celebrity culture.
  • Dana Wilde, MA '85, PhD '95, published his second collection of naturalist essays Winter: Notes and Numina from the Maine Woods (North Country Press, 2021) and A Backyard Book of Spiders in Maine (North Country Press 2020).
  • Vernell Wilks-Johnson '83 is the author of three books: Messy Mia, Leaving the Nest, and Moments In Time (Lulu, 2019).