Arabic Studies Courses

Arabic Studies Courses

  • Fall 2022

    ARAB 101 (2 Sections) – First-year Arabic I.


    Arabic is the fastest growing language in the United States and the fifth most spoken language in the world. ARAB 101 /ARAB 501 is the first in a sequence of courses in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA), the language of all official forms of communication and media throughout the Arab world, the register of Arabic taught in countries where Arabic is an official language, the liturgical language of more than two billion Muslims worldwide and millions of Arab Christians, and one of the six official languages of the United Nations. In this course, students will be introduced to the letters, sounds, and symbols that make up the Arabic writing system, and acquire basic skills in the areas of speaking, reading, writing, and listening.
    ARAB 203 (01) – Second-year Arabic I – Instructor:
    Students will acquire more vocabulary and learn fundamental morphological and syntactical structures that allow them to express themselves and respond to communication with ease in predictable situations.


    ARAB 180B – Intro to Modern Arabic Lit - Professor Kevin Lacey – GenEds: CH


    This course is designed to give students a first sustained glance at modern Arabic literature by way of a survey, through English translations, of some of the more seminal authors and works. Reading assignments will entail works (either in their entirety or parts thereof) of celebrated novelists, short story writers, play writers, essayists, and poets. Lectures and discussions as well as the examinations and the composition requirement for the course will revolve around these works.
    ARAB 305 – Third-year Arabic I – Professor Omid Ghaemmaghami
    In this course, students will learn important idioms and expressions, significantly expand their vocabulary, and acquire further knowledge of fundamental morphological and syntactical structures that allow them to express themselves orally and in writing with increasing grammatical accuracy.


    ARAB 380A – Framing Other Cultures - Professor Kevin Lacey – GenEds: AHO


    This course will examine latent as well as manifest Orientalism, its structures and strictures, its current most disquieting offshoots (Arabophobia and Islamophobia, especially with respect to Palestinians), how deeply it is inscribed (especially regarding Arab and Islamic civilizations) within "enabling" U.S. policies and institutions, and its association with aspirations of exclusion, domination, and control.


    ARAB 480E/AFST 480M/COLI 535N/ ENG 562C/TRIP 480F & 580L – World Afro-Arab Voices in Lit – Professor Mary Youssef

    Situating itself at the intersections of postcolonial studies, critical race studies, African and Arab Diasporic literatures, and Arabic literature, this course explores a number of Afro-Arab literary texts authored by writers who identify as African and Arab whether in the Arab world or in the diaspora. The course examines how Afro-Arab authors negotiate their identity, no matter where they are, in response to persistently exclusive discourses othering them from a different, dominant self on the basis of race and culture. In other words, this course pays attention to this overlooked hyphenated identity, Afro-Arab/Arab-African, and its imaginative expression of who, how, and where it is in the world.

  • Spring 2022

    ARAB 102 (2 Sections) – Elementary Arabic II – Instructor: Badreddine Ben Othman

    This course is the sequel course to ARAB 101: Elementary Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) II. In this course, students will continue to improve their essential language skills as well as cultural knowledge of the Arab world. Students will continue to be introduced to new vocabulary, learn to recognize word roots, and internalize sets of new morphological and syntactical formulas that will expand their Arabic expressions and help them exchange information about self, family, and immediate needs. In this course, students will learn to use the dictionary on the basis of their education in the Arabic root system. In-class activities may include watching scenes from documentaries and films and listening to popular music. 


    ARAB 204 (01) – Intermediate Arabic II – Instructor: Kevin Lacey

    This course is the sequel to ARAB 203: Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) I. Throughout the semester, students will continue improving their language skills with the aim of reaching the proficiency goals of the high-intermediate level. They will expand their vocabulary, learn important idioms and expressions, and acquire further knowledge of fundamental morphological and syntactical structures that allow them to express themselves with ease in predictable situations and read and write with increasing grammatical accuracy. 


    ARAB 306 – Advanced Standard Arabic II – Instructor: Mary Youssef

    The sequel to ARAB 305, this course prepares students to reach or surpass the goals of the advanced-low level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Throughout the semester, students will significantly expand their vocabulary and acquire further knowledge of fundamental morphological and syntactical structures that allow them to express themselves orally and in writing with increasing grammatical accuracy. 


    ARAB 380B – The Postcolonial Arabic Novel – Instructor: Mary Youssef – GenEds: GHO & Harpur W

    This course examines, through the critical lens of postcolonial theory, novels and fictional autobiographies—all in English translations—that are written by Arab authors from different parts of the Arab world: Egypt, Palestine, Libya, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Algeria, and the Sudan. The literary works are set in colonial, post-independence, and neocolonial times and illustrate how Arab writers creatively respond to dominant forms of power in their historical contexts. We will pay attention to issues of imperialism, nationalism, tradition, modernity, identity, migration, democracy, and revolution as they arise in these texts. 


    ARAB 380P – Modern Arabic Prose Readings – Instructor: Kevin Lacey

    Readings in Modern Standard Arabic prose, from selected authors and genres (e.g., short stories, essays, plays). The course is designed for Arabic language students at Binghamton University who have completed at least five semesters of study of modern standard Arabic. Prerequisite: ARAB 305 or higher.


    ARAB 385C/ISRL 315 - Israeli-Palestinian Conflict – Instructor: Shay Rabineau – GenEds: GN

    The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Israel-Palestine comprises the territory that lies between the Mediterranean Sea (on the west), Lebanon (in the north), the Gulf of Aqaba and the Sinai Peninsula (on the south) and the Jordan River (on the east). Although it covers a small geographic area and includes a relatively small population (compare present-day Israel's 8 million citizens with Egypt's 90 million), the dispute between the two rival sets of nationalisms which claim the sole right to control this territory has remained at the forefront of international attention for more than half a century. 

  • Fall 2021

    ARAB 101 (2 Sections) – Elementary Arabic I – Instructor: Ali Almajnooni

    Arabic is the fasting growing language in the United States and the fifth most spoken language in the world. ARAB 101 is the first in a sequence of courses in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA), the language of all official forms of communication and media throughout the Arab world, the register of Arabic taught in countries where Arabic is an official language, the liturgical language of some 1.8 billion Muslims and millions of Arab Christians, and one of the six official languages of the United Nations. 


    ARAB 203 (01) – Intermediate Arabic I – Instructor: Kevin Lacey

    This course is a continuation of the first-year language study of Modern Standard Arabic (MSA), by which students improve their language skills from the novice-high level to reach the proficiency goals of the intermediate level. Students will acquire more vocabulary and learn fundamental morphological and syntactical structures that allow them to express themselves and respond to communication with ease. 


    ARAB 281A – Arabic Word Formation I - Instructor: Kevin Lacey

    This course is designed to help students of Arabic (especially those at pre-advanced levels) improve their knowledge of the most basic word patterns in the language, which are both 1) very predictable and 2) the key for allowing rapid vocabulary build-up in all skill sets (reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking). Arabic works on a pattern system. PREREQUISITE: knowledge of the Arabic alphabet. 


    ARAB 305 – Advanced Standard Arabic I – Instructor: Mary Youssef 

    The sequel to ARAB 204, this course prepares students to reach or surpass the goals of the intermediate-high to advanced-low levels of proficiency. Throughout the semester, students will learn important idioms and expressions, significantly expand their vocabulary, and acquire further knowledge of fundamental morphological and syntactical structures that allow them to express themselves orally and in writing with increasing grammatical accuracy. 


    ARAB 380G/COLI 331C/ENG 380K/WGSS 383B – Race & Gender in Arab American Lit –  Instructor: Mary Youssef - GenEds: HOP & Harpur W

    This course offers a deep understanding of Arab-American literary production across the genres of the novel, poetry, the short story, and fictional autobiography. While interest in Arab immigrant literature in the U.S. has particularly culminated after the events of 9/11, authors from Arab descent have striven to creatively express their racial, religious, and cultural difference; draw attention to problems of differentiation in the U.S. due to persistently dominant Orientalist discourses; and negotiate their identity, all since the beginning of the twentieth century. 


Turkish Studies Courses

  • Fall 2022

    TURK 203/503 – Intermediate Modern Turkish I – Professor Greg Key


    Modern Turkish skills are further developed through speaking inside the classroom, interaction with native-speaker language partners, reading authentic texts containing more complex structures than in the first year, watching and listening to authentic on-line materials such as news broadcasts and television dramas, and writing short weekly essays. Awareness of the distinctive features of Turkish culture is developed through all of these means. The grammar focus is on complex structures (reported speech, relative clauses, etc.).


    TURK 480A/511 – Ottoman Turkish – Professor Greg Key


    Ottoman Turkish is the administrative and literary language of the Ottoman Empire. Written in Arabic script, Ottoman has a Turkish linguistic core, with substantial influence from Classical Arabic and Persian. In this one-semester class, the following skills and topics are covered: Ottoman spelling, paleography, Persian and Arabic grammar and vocabulary as found in Ottoman, and archaic Turkish grammar. Two script styles are taught: nesih (Arabic nasx) and rıka (Arabic ruq‘a), respectively the standard printed and handwritten fonts of the late Ottoman period (ca. 18th-20th centuries). Reading is the primary skill developed, with a secondary emphasis on rıka penmanship, on the premise that this will aid in the reading of handwritten documents. Texts to be used throughout the semester include a selection of printed and handwritten documents. PREREQUISITE: TWO YEARS OF TURKISH (or demonstrated equivalent proficiency).

  • Spring 2022

    TURK 112 – Elementary Modern Turkish II – Instructor: Greg Key – ONLINE HYBRID COURSE

    Continuation of elementary modern Turkish, which is spoken in the Republic of Turkey, as well as in large immigrant communities throughout Europe. Conversational skills will be further developed, and a greater emphasis will be placed on watching and listening to authentic media materials, as well as on reading and writing. 

     
    TURK 380R – Turkish Language Reform – Instructor: Greg Key 

    This course examines the Turkish Language Reform, a national campaign of the early Turkish Republic aimed at ridding Turkish of foreign borrowings. This was one of numerous reforms implemented by Mustafa Kemal (Atatürk), founder and first president of the Republic in the aftermath of World War I and the fall of the Ottoman Empire. It was the duty of the Turkish Language Society, a newly formed government body, to find “pure” Turkish replacements for words of mostly Arabic and Persian origin. Some of the replacement words were already in use in standard Turkish, others were borrowed from regional dialects and other Turkic languages, and still others were invented as neologisms using Turkish roots and suffixes. This course investigates the reform from the standpoints of history, language ideology and nationalism, and linguistics.

  • Fall 2021

    TURK 111 – Elementary Modern Turkish – Prof. Greg Key – ONLINE HYBRID COURSE

    Introduces basic structures of modern Turkish, which is spoken in the Republic of Turkey, as well as in large immigrant communities throughout Europe. From the very first day of class, there is an emphasis on speaking, both inside and outside the classroom, so that by the end of the first semester students will be comfortable having very basic conversations in Turkish. Written exercises will provide the foundation for writing skills in Turkish, to be further developed in subsequent semesters. 



    TURK 380L/LING 380T – Turkish Linguistics – Professor Greg Key – GenEd: O

    This course examines the Turkish language from the perspective of various subfields of linguistic inquiry. We begin by looking at the history of Turkish, its place within the Turkic language family, and the Altaic hypothesis, which asserts that Turkish is related to languages such as Mongolian, Manchu, Japanese and Korean. There are no prerequisites for this class, and no prior knowledge of Turkish is necessary. Concurrent enrollment in TURK 111 is encouraged but not required.