Charles E. Scheidt Postdoctoral Fellows

Since 2020, the Institute hosts up to two postdoctoral fellows for yearlong research and teaching residencies. This competitive fellowship attracts applicants from around the world with PhDs in a variety of academic fields, and a strong documented interest in and potential for significant work in atrocity prevention that bridges the divide between academic research and prevention practice.

2021-2022

Tutku Ayhan

Email: tayhan@binghamton.edu

Image: Tutku Ayhan
Tutku Ayhan
Tutku Ayhan is a security studies scholar interested in gender, violence, and politics. Her dissertation project examines Yezidi women’s post-genocide resilience and empowerment. Based on multi-site fieldwork in Iraqi Kurdistan, Germany, and the United States, it shows that post-conflict conditions have intersectional consequences for women depending on their demographic features as well as situational positionings. By identifying the factors that lead to resilience and empowerment for women in post-conflict and their intersection, Tutku’s research aims to advance policy-making efforts for more inclusive reconstruction and peacebuilding. Her work has received support from Global Religion Research Initiative at University of Notre Dame, The Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS) at George Washington University, and APSA Religion and Politics Section.

Saghar Birjandian

Email: sbirjand@binghamton.edu

Image: Saghar Birjandian
Saghar Birjandian
Saghar Birjandian is a scholar-practitioner with years of experience working on transitional justice and atrocity prevention initiatives in Canada, Uganda, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

Her research focuses on developing and applying critical approaches to transitional justice policy development that evade mainstream and non-mainstream prescriptions. To this end, her research demonstrates the utility in using norm-typologies and soft systems thinking to help sequence problems stemming from mass violence requiring transitional justice response in Uganda and more recently, in Canada.

Saghar’s latest project as a practitioner involved collaboratively integrating an institutional reform framework that specifically aims to reduce the number of Indigenous children in government care as one of many necessary steps in Canada’s attempt to address the legacy of genocide against Indigenous peoples. Prior to this Saghar was the Director of George Mason University’s (GMU) Genocide Prevention Network and Deputy Director of GMU’s Genocide Prevention Program, where she primarily worked in Uganda and the Great Lakes Region of Africa. She also had the honour of serving as a Statement Gatherer for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, which was mandated to document the effects of genocide and other atrocities perpetrated through Canada’s Indian Residential School system.


2020-2021

Darcie DeAngelo

Image: Darcie DeAngelo
Darcie DeAngelo
Darcie DeAngelo is a medical anthropologist with training in sensory ethnography. Her area of focus is on post-conflict relations and landmine detection industries in Cambodia, especially those that work with animal detection aids. She is dedicated to engaged research and has conducted research from public mental health to international policy. In her public humanities exhibitions, she troubles the boundary between art and anthropology. These pieces have been shown in a wide variety of places from academic conferences, art galleries, to experimental public-facing exhibitions. She is currently a Mansfield-Luce Asia Scholar as well as working at I-GMAP as a Charles E. Scheidt Postdoctoral Fellow.

Darcie taught GMAP 483C / SUST 581C / ENVI 481C, Ecologies & Atrocities in Spring 2021. She has since joined the faculty in anthropology at the University of Oklahoma.

Jenny Escobar

Pronouns: She/ Her/ Hers

Image: Jenny Escobar
Jenny Escobar
For over 15 years, Dr. Escobar has played an active role in the transnational movement for justice for survivors of state violence.  She became involved with the healing justice strategies of survivors throughout Latin America and South Africa focusing her scholarly work on Colombia, her birth place. She worked alongside survivors on the ground while connecting their realities to academic inquiries as noted in her publications Memoria Viva: State Violence and the Movement for Memory in Colombia (2013), and From rescue to solidarity: (Re)humanizing relationships for social transformation (2017). More recently, as a Restorative Justice practitioner, she has developed a vision and implementation model for justice centered K-12 schools and universities in the United States. Through these efforts, she has worked to dismantle punitive and oppressive systems such as the school-to-prison pipeline, while centering the vision of young people and communities mostly impacted by state violence. Her research and lifelong commitments are guided by her connection to ancestral and spiritual knowledge where the natural world and a decolonial approach root her analysis and practice of justice.  

Jenny will taught GMAP 482D / SOC 480M, Reimagining Justice in Spring 2021.


Previous Postdoctoral Fellows

Kerry Whigham (2018-2020)

  • Incoming assistant professor of genocide and mass atrocity prevention at Binghamton University.

Gabriella Lloyd (2017-2018)

  • Assistant professor in the Department of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland.