Seed Grant Program

Seed grants are awarded with funding provided by the Binghamton University Road Map through the Provost's Office and the Division of Research.

The goal of these seed grants is to encourage faculty to develop collaborative projects that stimulate the advancement of new ideas that can build Binghamton University's expertise toward a national reputation in the broad area of material and visual worlds. This competitive, peer-reviewed program is providing initial support for proposed long-term programs of collaborative research that have strong potential to attract external funding.

The call for proposals for seed grant funding for the 2019–2020 academic year, including an overview, an explanation of the process and eligibility, a proposal cover page and a proposal budget page is available on this website.

Note that the deadline for proposals to the Material and Visual Worlds Transdisciplinary Area of Excellence is Friday, Feb. 15, 2019, rather than the Feb. 1 deadline for the other TAEs.

For the 2018–2019 academic year, the following seed grant was awarded:

The Abstract Body: Medicine, Science, and the Knowability of Human Experience

Matthew Wolf-Meyer, anthropology, and Fa-Ti Fan, history

The human body has long been subject to the abstractions of scientific and medical knowledge production, moving from the materiality of the body to the visual, textual, and eventually, quantitative, representation of organs, processes, and illnesses. Scholars have long focused on this movement from the materiality of the body to its visual and textual representations. The present moment, in which the human body is increasingly subject to computer-aided abstraction, has been attended to less thoroughly. The Abstract Body is a two-day workshop bringing together a variety of scholars interested in a wide variety of mechanisms of bodily abstraction. Our conversation will be situated in the overlapping theoretical models of "blackboxing" and reification. This workshop aims to catalyze the potential of these theoretical models in reconceptualizing the human body as a site of scientific and medical abstraction. The workshop will consist of pre-circulated papers, which will be discussed by an assigned discussant, opening a conversation for assembled participants. Our hope is to collect the papers in an edited volume or special issue of a journal.