Youth Initiative

Volunteer with youth in local schools

The Binghamton University Community Schools initiative, a partnership between the College of Community and Public Affairs, the Center for Civic Engagement and local school districts, provides opportunities for Binghamton University students to volunteer and intern with local youth. Opportunities include:

  • internships and volunteer positions
  • class-based tutoring
  • after-school tutoring and programs
  • lunchtime engagement
  • anti-bullying programs
  • parent and family engagement
  • event-based volunteerism

Through these programs, Binghamton University students provide academic assistance and social support to students in need of all ages, increasing their self-esteem and overall motivation for school work. Binghamton students also gain experience providing one-on-one and small-group instruction in the classroom.

Find current openings in the CCE's Service Listings and fill out the interest form below to let us know you're interested in participating: 

Complete the Interest Form

Someone from our office will follow up with you regarding opportunities that match your interest and availability after receiving your completed interest form.

Students who wish to participate in a CCE community-based program and who have previously been convicted of a felony will be asked about their prior criminal history. This may impede your ability to participate in certain programs. Contact Alison Handy Twang with any questions or concerns.

2019-20 Youth Initiative outcomes:

456 Binghamton University student volunteers, interns and service-learners served 13,762 hours in 8 local school districts, impacting 6,130 youth!


Testimonials from volunteers and interns

I had a wonderful experience as a volunteer classroom supporter at Windsor Central High School. I got to work with a few teachers over the semester for a variety of subjects. Hanging out with the students and helping the teachers allowed me to meet so many people and see more of what the Southern Tier has to offer.

Alison Derevensky, Windsor School District

 

Interning at Benjamin Franklin helped me confirm that I want to work in a school some day. I was always excited to help out in the classroom, since I could see so much growth within each student's abilities as the semester went on. The students were excited to learn, just as I was always excited to be there.

 Tara Battersby, Binghamton School District

 

I immediately felt welcomed at my site before I began my first day. Although I was a little nervous to begin interacting with the students, to my surprise, some of the students were welcoming and showed me their friends and their favorite activities to do during recess. Over time, I built a connection with the students and the staff.

Melissa Donayre, Chenango Forks School District

 

I was placed in a fourth grade classroom at Benjamin Franklin Elementary School, where I helped the ENL (English New Language) students. I formed connections with the students which allowed us to work better together on tasks such as reading and comprehension. The students felt comfortable enough asking me for help with their spelling or simply being a set of ears that they could read to. It was a wonderful experience and I hope to be back next semester.

Megan Tapia, Binghamton School District

 

As a volunteer in the Success at Recess Program, I interact with kids in recess to make sure everyone feels included and is having fun while being respectful. During a kindergarten session, I approached a girl with a board game, alone. I told her that I would play with her, which immediately brightened her mood. She told me she didn't know [how to play the game] and seemed discouraged. We started making our own rules for the boardgame, and I could see the excitement in her eyes. As recess concluded, she told me she couldn't wait until next week when we would finalize our game. I was so glad to know that I not only made this girl less sad in the moment, but gave her positive things to look forward to, as well as inspiring her to think creatively.

Victoria Barics, Chenango Forks School District