Our Centers

Our Centers

S3IP has five research centers:

CAMM

The Center for Advanced Microelectronics Manufacturing (CAMM) leads a New York-centered team supported by a $75 million, five-year federal initiative to advance flexible hybrid electronics manufacturing. As part of America's first Innovation Institute for Flexible Hybrid Electronics Manufacturing, CAMM demonstrates the feasibility of roll-to-roll flexible electronics manufacturing. Its 10,000-square-foot facility has a panel line for process and product development and an integrated roll-to-roll research line for product development.


CASP

The Center for Autonomous Solar Power (CASP) addresses scientific challenges to reduce the cost of solar power and enhance energy efficiency. The center, established in 2008, draws expertise from engineering, chemistry and physics to bridge the gap between technology and commercialization. CASP conducts research related to thin-film solar cells, supercapacitors, thermoelectric cells and reliability studies with an emphasis on Earth-abundant, low-toxicity materials.

 

ES2

The Center for Energy-Smart Electronic Systems (ES2), a National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center, brings government, industry and academic partners together to develop methods for efficiently operating electronic systems, including data centers. The focus is on controlling resources and managing workloads to achieve optimal energy consumption. ES2 runs a data center that is a living lab where industry standards can be tested and developed.

 

IEEC

The Integrated Electronics Engineering Center (IEEC), a New York State Center for Advanced Technology, performs research in electronics packaging for the technological and economic benefit of its member companies. Capabilities include reliability analysis; mechanical/thermal analysis and testing; solder mechanics; failure mechanism determination; and micromechanical analysis and testing. Researchers affiliated with the center, founded in 1991, also conduct research on sensors and new materials for electronics systems.

 

NECCES

The NorthEast Center for Chemical Energy Storage (NECCES) supports basic research in the design of the next generation of lithium-ion batteries. The center focuses on the development of new chemistries and improving our fundamental understanding of the physical and chemical processes that occur in these complex systems. NECCES is supported by a $12.8 million, four-year grant from the Department of Energy as an Energy Frontier Research Center. Partner institutions include Rutgers University, Argonne National Laboratory, Cambridge University, MIT, the University of Michigan, the University of Illinois at Chicago, the University of California at Berkley, the University of California at Santa Barbara and the University of California at San Diego.